Simon Sees as Simon Does: Evidence for a Perception-Action Model of Letter Recognition

Document Type: 
ASSC Conference Item
Article Type: 
Experimental
Disciplines: 
Psychology
Topics: 
Sensory Systems
Keywords: 
action-perception, letter recognition, visual cognition, priming, visuo-motor priming
Deposited by: 
Mr Jim Parkinson
Date of Issue: 
2006
Authors: 
Jim Parkinson, Beena Khurana
Event Dates: 
23-26 June 2006
Event Location: 
Oxford, UK
Event Title: 
10th annual meeting of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness
Event Type: 
ASSC Conference
Presentation Type: 
Poster
Number of Pages: 
1
Alternative URL: 
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/users/jmp30
Abstract: 
Simon Sees as Simon Does: Evidence for a Perception-Action Model of Letter Recognition Parkinson, Jim and Khurana, Beena (2006) Simon Sees as Simon Does: Evidence for a Perception-Action Model of Letter Recognition. In: 10th annual meeting of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness, 23-26 June 2006, Oxford, UK. Full text available as: PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader 688 Kb Alternative URL: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/users/jmp30 Abstract Simon Sees as Simon Does: Evidence for a Perception-Action Model of Letter Recognition Does the perception of objects that are the result of human actions reflect the dynamic structure of the actions that give rise to them? Previously (ASSC9), we showed that stroke order primes letter recognition: Computer generated letters, e.g., ‘N’, are presented as a temporally unfolding sequence of constituent strokes. Letter recognition is faster if the stroke sequence mimics writing action compared to when it does not. We proposed that stroke order priming is due to letter perception reflecting the temporal structure of letter production. Here we manipulate the availability of the strokes via masking and reduced exposure durations in order to test the non-strategic nature of stroke order priming. In Experiment 1 each frame in a stroke sequence was presented for 100 ms interspersed with 100 ms pattern masks. Stroke order priming occurred even in the presence of masking. In two further experiments, each frame was presented without masking for durations ranging from 10-500 ms. A significant stroke order priming effect occurred even at 20 ms per stroke. Moreover, we also observed a ‘garden path’ effect, in that an initial stroke order consistent with letter writing slowed responses to a subsequent non-letter. This replication of stroke order priming across a large range of frame durations attests to the robustness of the effect. The magnitude of the priming effect, in relation to frame-duration, appears to be normally distributed; reduced priming at both lower and higher frame-durations with a peak priming effect at frame-durations of around 100 ms. Intriguingly, the frame-durations that render peak priming are consonant with average writing speed in terms of time-per-stroke (Plamondon, 1991). The modulation of stroke order priming by frame-duration suggests that priming may have both visual and motoric contributors. In sum, the masking and frame-duration findings endorse a perception-action model of letter recognition, even in the absence of the dynamic information associated with handwritten letters. Priming in the presence of visual masks and greatly reduced exposure intervals further questions the tenability of a strategic account of stroke order priming. Peak priming with frame durations that match writing speed suggests that Simon sees as Simon does.
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Parkinson_&_Khurana_(2006)_-_ASSC10_Poster_Presentation.pdf687.35 KB