On the possibility of direct memory

Document Type: 
Book Chapter
Article Type: 
Theoretical
Disciplines: 
Psychology
Topics: 
Memory
Keywords: 
Redintegration, time, invariance, cued recall, priming, imagery, subject performed tasks
Deposited by: 
Dr Stephen E Robbins
Date of Issue: 
2006
Authors: 
Stephen E. Robbins
Title of Book: 
New Developments in Consciousness Research
Page Range: 
01/01/64
Number of Pages: 
225
Publisher: 
Nova Science
ISBN: 
1-60021-247-6
Alternative URL: 
http://www.stephenerobbins.com/Articles/Nova-Direct%20Memory-3.pdf
Abstract: 
Is experience stored in the brain? The answer to this question is critical, for it strongly constrains possible theories of the nature and origin of consciousness. If the answer is “yes,” conscious experience must be generated from stored “elements” within the neural structure. If the answer is “no,” Searle’s principle of neurobiological sufficiency, as one example, carries no force. On the other hand, a theory of direct perception can be construed to actually require a “no” answer, but then would require a theory of memory not reliant on brain storage. Perception research is reviewed which describes the invariance laws defining the elementary, time-extended, perceived events that must be “stored” and which speaks simultaneously to the nature of the qualia of these events. To support this description of perceived, external events, a model of “direct memory” is described, wherein the brain is viewed as supporting a modulated reconstructive wave passing through a holographic matter-field. The modulation pattern is determined or driven by the invariance laws defining external events. The model is applied to several areas of memory theory in cued-recall, to include verbal paired-associate learning, concreteness and imagery, subject performed tasks and priming. Some implications are reviewed for cognition in general, mental imagery, eye-witness phenomena and the question of whether everything experienced is “stored.” The model is predictive and at the very least holds its own relative to current theory without appealing to storage of experience within the brain.
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