Metacognition and Mindreading: Judgments of Learning for Self and Other During Self-paced Study

Document Type: 
Article
Article Type: 
Experimental
Disciplines: 
Psychology
Topics: 
Self and Mental State Attribution
Keywords: 
metacognition, mindreading; judgments of learning; theory of mind; monitoring and control
Deposited by: 
Asher Koriat
Contact email: 
akoriat@research.haifa.ac.il
Date of Issue: 
2010
Authors: 
Asher Koriat, Rakefet Ackerman
Series Name: 
Consciousness and Cognition
Volume: 
19
Page Range: 
251-264
Number of Pages: 
15
Publisher: 
Elsevier
Official URL: 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2009.12.010
Publish status: 
Published
Abstract: 
The relationship between metacognition and mindreading was investigated by comparing the monitoring of one’s own learning (Self) and another person’s learning (Other). Previous studies indicated that in self-paced study judgments of learning (JOLs) for oneself are inversely related to the amount of study time (ST) invested in each item. This suggested reliance on the memorizing effort heuristic that shorter ST is diagnostic of better recall. In this study although an inverse ST-JOL relationship was observed for Self, it was found for Other only when the Other condition followed the Self condition. The results were interpreted in terms of the proposal that the processes underlying experience-based metacognitive judgments are largely unconscious. However, participants can derive insight from observing themselves as they monitor their own learning, and transfer that insight to Other, thus exhibiting a shift from experience-based to theory-based judgments. Although different processes mediate metacognition and mindreading, metacognition can inform mindreading.
AttachmentSize
Koriat Ackerman 2010 - Metacognition_and_Mindreading JOLs.pdf264.76 KB