Public

ASSC 19 - Registration - NonMember - Early

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • PRIMARY AFFILIATION (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • EMAIL (For Receipt): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 ASSC NON-MEMBER TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE XXX (automatically included)

  •  TUTORIAL 1 - XXX
  •  TUTORIAL 2 - XXX
  •  TUTORIAL 3 - XXX
  •  TUTORIAL 4 - XXX
  •  TUTORIAL 5 - XXX
  •   CONFERENCE DINNER - XXX
  •   CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSC 18 - Registration

 ASSC18 CONFERENCE Early Fees  (Prior to May 15th)Late Fees
Conference Registration - Non-member AU $450 AU $500
Conference Registration - ASSC Member
AU $350
AU $400
Conference Registration - ASSC Student Member AU $150 AU $200
Conference Registration - Local UQ Student
AU $75
AU $100
Conference Dinner (optional) AU $100 Au $100
Tutorials & Short-Course
AU $50 (Each)
AU $50 (Each)
Post-Conference Panpsychism Workshop (Byron Bay)
SOLD OUT
SOLD OUT
   

 

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*Link to currency converter

 

                 ----- CONFERENCE REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS -----

                                      

Conference Registration for STUDENT MEMBERS

Note if you have only just applied for membership you will need to wait a few days for your membership to be processed. You will recieve an email notification once your login account has been created.

  • 1) LOGIN: To access the student member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password".  If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.

  • 2) [Click here to proceed to STUDENT MEMBER registration]


Conference Registration for MEMBERS

Note if you have only just applied for membership you will need to wait a few days for your membership to be processed. You will recieve an email notification once your login account has been created.

  • 1) LOGIN To access the member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password". If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.


Conference Registration for NON-MEMBERS

Note:  If you are not currently a member, but would like to take advantage of the member's discount, please go to our member registration page http://www.theassc.org/join_assc  You will need to allow a few days for the membership to be processed and will be notified once your login account has been created.              

 

Conference Registration for UQ Students

If you are currently enrolled as an undergraduate, or graduate student at the university of queensland you are able to register at a reduced price. You will need to provide your student number and UQ email address as proof of your student status.

ASSC 18 - Registration - UQ Students - Late

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • PRIMARY AFFILIATION (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • EMAIL (For Receipt): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 UQ STUDENT TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE $100 (automatically included)

  • MORNING SHORT COURSE - "Integrated Information Theory Of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 1 - Andreas Keller: "Olfactory Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 2 - Joel Pearson: "Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus"
  • TUTORIAL 3 - Colin Hales: "Neuromorphic Chips: Replication, Emulation and Simulation in the Science of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 4 - Claude Touzet: "Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness"
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER - Dinner will be a relaxed feast amongst native Australian Animals at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending
  • POST-CONFERENCE SATTELITE EVENT - Byron Bay Panpsychism workshop

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSC 18 - Registration - NonMember - Late

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • PRIMARY AFFILIATION (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • EMAIL (For Receipt): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 NON-MEMBER TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE $500 (automatically included)

  • MORNING SHORT COURSE - "Integrated Information Theory Of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 1 - Andreas Keller: "Olfactory Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 2 - Joel Pearson: "Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus"
  • TUTORIAL 3 - Colin Hales: "Neuromorphic Chips: Replication, Emulation and Simulation in the Science of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 4 - Claude Touzet: "Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness"
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER - Dinner will be a relaxed feast amongst native Australian Animals at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending
  • POST-CONFERENCE SATTELITE EVENT - Byron Bay Panpsychism workshop

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSC 18 - Registration - UQ Students - Early

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • UQ STUDENT NUMBER: *
  • EMAIL (uq student email): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 UQ STUDENT TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE $75 (automatically included)

  • MORNING SHORT COURSE - "Integrated Information Theory Of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 1 - Andreas Keller: "Olfactory Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 2 - Joel Pearson: "Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus"
  • TUTORIAL 3 - Colin Hales: "Neuromorphic Chips: Replication, Emulation and Simulation in the Science of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 4 - Claude Touzet: "Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness"
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER - Dinner will be a relaxed feast amongst native Australian Animals at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSC 18 - Registration - NonMember - Early

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • PRIMARY AFFILIATION (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • EMAIL (For Receipt): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 ASSC NON-MEMBER TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE $450 (automatically included)

  • MORNING SHORT COURSE - "Integrated Information Theory Of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 1 - Andreas Keller: "Olfactory Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 2 - Joel Pearson: "Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus"
  • TUTORIAL 3 - Colin Hales: "Neuromorphic Chips: Replication, Emulation and Simulation in the Science of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 4 - Claude Touzet: "Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness"
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER - Dinner will be a relaxed feast amongst native Australian Animals at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consciousness - here, there, everywhere? The prospects for panpsychism

Sunday 20th and Monday 21st of July 2014

Venue: The Byron at Byron Bay http://www.thebyronatbyron.com.au/   Byron Bay is 90min south of Brisbane (View Google Map)

Organizers: Chair - Naotsugu Tsuchiya (Monash University), Bruno van Swinderen (U of Queensland), Olivia Carter (U of Melbourne)

Registration: $200  -  SOLD OUT

Contact: for questions about this event please contact Naotsugu Tsuchiya

Confirmed speakers:
  • David Chalmers (philosophy, ANU, NYU)
  • Christof Koch (neuroscience, the Allen Institute)
  • Monica Gagliano (evolutionary biology, U of Western Australia)
  • Yasuo Kuniyoshi (robotics, U of Tokyo)
  • Larrisa Albantakis (neuroscience, U of Wisconsin)
  • Mandyam Srinivasan (neuroscience, U of Queensland)
  • Giulio Tononi (neuroscience, U of Wisconsin)

 

Main theme: Panpsychism is a meta-theoretical framework, which assumes consciousness is a fundamental aspect of the universe. There are many variants of panpsychism, but all admit that organisms, large or small, and even inorganic materials, can be conscious to variable degrees, with consciousness of higher organisms being more sophisticated and complex than that of lower organisms. Common to all panpsychist approaches is the strong belief that "consciousness cannot emerge from nothing". By contrast, emergentist views posit that "some" special condition is required to ensure that some "biological" organisms come to possess consciousness. The emergence view has been popular since the last century, mainly due to the success of physical science in other domains. However, emergence as radical as consciousness is unprecendented in any field of science, and the special conditions that would be necessary for the emergence of consciousness remain unspecified.

 

Objectives: In this workshop, we will re-consider panpsychism – long neglected –- from historical, philosophical, and neuroscientific viewpoints. As a neuroscientific approach that shares some essential intuitions with panpsychism, we will examine the Integrated Information Theory of consciousness. In so doing, we will revisit many fundamental questions that can potentially be addressed with a rigorous theoretical approach and empirical investigations. The main questions we will discuss are the following:

  1. Can one conceive of "continuity" of consciousness from conception to death, across evolution, across species from humans, mice, flies, worms, to unicellular organisms, and across inorganic systems, like robots and Internet? 
  2. What is the "unit" of consciousness? If panpsychism is true, can any cell in my body be conscious at the same time as I am conscious thanks to my brain (micro-panpsychism problem). Can a society that includes myself also be conscious (macro-panpsychism problem)? Integrated information theory avoids this "combination problem" by supposing only "local maxima" matters. But why would it be that only local maxima matter? Are there other principled explanations?
  3. How does the current neuroscientific study of 'non-conscious processing' challenge panpsychism? Alternatively, what can panpsychism offer for interpreting 'non-conscious processing'?  Is it possible that the level of consciousness of lower animals or in inorganic objects is similar (or even lower) to that of non-conscious processing in us?
  4. If there is consciousness in other animals, what "kind" of experience or qualia do they experience? Can a quantitative theory be developed that can predict not only the quantity but also the quality of experience in other animals?
  5. Is it possible to empirically test any panpsychistic claim? Could we test for the presence of consciousness in lower animals, in robots or within the Internet? And what would a test be like?


To restrict the scope of the discussions, we will consider "consciousness" as raw experience.  Thus we will deliberately not discuss the role of self-consciousness, the requirement for language, and embodiment.


References:

 

Accommodation Details

The conference will be held at The Byron at Byron Bay http://www.thebyronatbyron.com.au/ Rooms at this spectacular venue cost $300/night but can be shared by two people.

Note: For alternative accommodation options visit the Byron Bay accommodation website http://www.byron-bay.com/accommodation

ASSC 18 - Successful Registration

 

 

 

                                                             Thank you.

                            Your payment has been processed succesfully!!

 

 

For any questions regarding your registration please contact Bruno van Swinderen

 

 

 

ASSC 18 Dinner

 

 

   

The conference dinner for ASSC18 will be held on Friday 18th July at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary (http://www.koala.net/). This will be a uniquely Australian experience alllowing you to interact with a variety of native Australian animals in a beautiful location .. including have your photo taken with a koala!!

Each conference ticket AU $100 will include

1. An Australian BBQ dinner
2. Access to most of the Koala Sanctuary
3. A night-time guided tour and animal encounters
4. A koala cuddle and professional photo
5. Transportation to and from the Koala Sanctuary (by boat or bus .. see below)

Transportation will be by bus (around 20 minutes from the University). However, THE FIRST 100 DINNER TICKETS sold will have the unique opportunity of enjoying a river cruise from the University to the Koala Sanctuary, along the Brisbane river (about 1 hour), passing a large colony of fruit bats along the way.

To register [Click Here]


                          The boat will take people to the dinner ... as limited space is available seats will go to the first 100 tickets sold

ASSC 18 Tutorials

                                                                            Wednesday July 16, 2014   

Morning Short-Course: Integrated Information Theory of Consciousness

  • Giulio Tononi (University of Wisconsin, USA)
  • Christof Koch (Allen Institute for Brain Science)
  • Naotsugu Tsuchiya (Monash University, Australia)
  • Masafumi Oizumi (Riken Brain Science Institute, Japan)
  • Larissa Albantakis (University of Wisconsin, USA)

Integrated information theory of consciousness (IIT) has recently attracted attention among consciousness researchers. The tutorial at ASSC17 was sold out, and many have asked for an in-depth presentation of the theory and its implications. We propose to: i) introduce the basic notions of IIT to a broad audience without requiring a mathematical background, and provide hands-on examples in which integrated information can be computed rigorously; ii) introduce measures of integrated information that can be applied to empirical data and discuss how they can be applied to evaluate the level of consciousness in wake, sleep, anesthesia, and disorders of consciousness; iii) discuss the problem of assessing the presence of consciousness in animals and machines, and how IIT can provide a principled approach; iv) demonstrate how integrated information grows in animals adapting to a complex environment, thereby shedding light on the evolution of consciousness; v) consider the explanatory, predictive, and inferential power of IIT; and vi) consider potential problems and future developments.

                                      ---------------------- Tutorials ----------------------

TUTORIAL 1: “Olfactory Consciousness.”

  • Andreas Keller (The Rockerfeller University, USA)

The word "visual" appears 222 times in last year's ASSC Conference program book. The world "olfactory" appears only once. This is unfortunate because the olfactory system is much simpler and more primitive than the visual system, yet it is perfectly capable of processing information consciously. In many other fields of biology, studying simple model systems has been spectacularly successful in increasing our understanding of basic processes. There is no reason to believe that this would be any different in consciousness researchers. The goal of my proposed tutorial is to introduce consciousness researchers to olfaction as a simple, evolutionary conserved, and well-understood model system for consciousness research. I will point out some facts about visual consciousness that are often assumed to be true for all perceptual cosnciousness, although they depend on special adaptations in the visual system. I will also discuss several attempts to falsify or confirm theories of consciousness in the olfactory system. I am currently co-editing a Research Topic "Olfactory Consciousness across Disciplines" for Frontiers in Consciousness Research and some of the material presented will be based on the 15 contributions to this collection. 

 

TUTORIAL 2: “Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus."

  • Joel Pearson  (University of New South Wales, Australia)

Hallucinations, mental imagery, synaesthesia and many illusions can all create a wakeful conscious experience without a corresponding stimulus or sensory stimulation. Historically research into such dimensions of conscious experience has suffered criticism and lacked scientific traction due to the methodological constraints caused by the inherent private nature of such experiences. Accordingly, empirical consciousness research has tended to focus on the inverse situation: neural stimulation without consciousness awareness (Binocular rivalry, masking, continuous flash suppression). However, recently objective research methods have been introduced that allow a more direct investigation into the mechanisms and neural substrates of conscious experience that lacks a direct external cause. This tutorial will offer researchers at all levels an overview of pertinent methodological and conceptual issues and will cover:

  1. The range of new and old research and relevant methods.
  2. The theory behind these methods.
  3. Some practical hands on experience.
  4. The capabilities, limitations and implications of using such methods.
  5. How these methods can be used for applied research in clinical and non- clinical settings.

Together, these new methods can expand empirical consciousness research by investigating conscious experience when stimulation has been removed. Questions and interactive discussion will be emphasized

 

TUTORIAL 3: “Neuromorphic Chips: Replication, Emulation and Simulation in the Science of Consciousness”

  • Colin Hales (The University of Melbourne, Australia)

Neuromorphic engineering is presented as having fundamentally lost touch with real empirical science. The computational exploration of an abstract model of the original tissue is a form of theoretical science, not empirical science. In neuromorphic engineering, this computational exploration is called (formally) emulation. This contrasts with traditional empirical science, which  is called replication – the retention of the essential physics of the natural process. Like the Wright brothers replicate flight by retaining the essential physics of flight , replication-based neuromorphic engineering would retain the essential physics of the brain, and if consciousness is created by essential physics, then retention of the correct physics leads to viable claims of consciousness in an artificial inorganic brain made of replication-based neuromorphic chips. Emulation eliminates the original physics, and has ‘thrown the consciousness baby out with the essential-physics bathwater’ from day 1. Therefore no neuromorphic chip of the present design basis can ever be claimed to be examining consciousness or generate consciousness. Rather, they are examining a hypothesis that cognition can happen without it.
 
A novel kind of neuromorphic chip is introduced that replicates, inorganically, brain tissue physics, as part of a campaign of real empirical physics designed to determine what is the essential physics of the brain. The new design will be contrasted with existing designs.

 

TUTORIAL 4: “Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness."

  • Claude Touzet  (Aix-Marseille University, France)

Formalized in 2010, the Theory of neuronal Cognition and Consciousness (TnCC) departs from all existing materialist theories of mind by claiming that our brain does not process information, but only represents information. The logical implication is that we are only a crystallization of our interactions with the environment. Since « extraordinary claims require extraordinary proofs », the goal of my tutorial is to provide researchers at all levels with the neuronal blueprints of a (large) number of cognitive functions and concepts. After the description of the cortex as a hierarchy of self-organizing associative memories, I will show how the synergy between sensory and sensory-motor maps generates behaviors. I will then offer explanations about intelligence (a side effect of the observer knowledge), consciousness (an automatic verbalization), endogenous and exogenous attentions, episodic and semantic memories, motivation or joy (a side effect of associative memories functioning). TnCC also offers tentative explanations about a few brain diseases (schizophrenia, depression, Alzheimer's disease, autism) and answers to long-lasting questions such as why we must sleep, how hypnosis works, what is the placebo effect, and how unsupervised systems achieve homeostasis. However the biggest TnCC result relates to the fact that the absence of free-will is a sure guaranty that we must promote altruism to increase our personal happiness.

ASSC 18 Symposia

SYMPOSIUM 1: Unconscious perception: Does it exist, and what should we require from evidence? 

Summary:

Which processes require awareness, and which can be accomplished in its absence? This distinction is considered a promising approach toward understanding consciousness. Recent years have seen an explosion of studies demonstrating unconscious perceptual and cognitive processing. Their abundance stems from a current zeitgeist that views unconscious processes as “cool” and the popularity of easy-to-use methods for suppressing stimuli from awareness. Uncritical acceptance of all recent findings might lead one to conclude that consciousness is almost incidental to perceptual and cognitive processes. But should we take all such findings at face value? What criteria should we set for accepting claims of processing without awareness, and are these criteria routinely met? This symposium will focus on the need for rigor in verifying claims of unconscious processing. We will present work pertaining to the distinction between objective and subjective measures of (un)awareness, the role of metacognitive processes in such distinctions, and the need to rule out explanations that do not invoke unconscious processing, before concluding that it has occurred. Following individual presentations, we will conduct a group discussion on the best ways to verify unconscious processing. 

Chair: David Carmel and Axel Cleeremans

Talk 1. David Carmel (University of Edinburgh, UK)
"Unconscious perception is not a single thing"

Talk 2. Joel Pearson (The University of New South Wales, Australia)
“Using unconscious information for sensory and bistable decisions”

Talk 3. Zoltan Dienes (University of Sussex, UK)
“Improving on the null hypothesis: Bayesian objective and subjective thresholds”

Talk 4. Axel Cleeremans (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium)
“The mind’s sea serpent”

 

SYMPOSIUM 2: Consciousness Across The Species: The adaptive Value of Pain

Summary:

Nociception without conscious awareness allows organisms to avoid tissue damage in certain situations. Spinal cords detached from brains are capable of learning complex responses to noxious stimulation. Yet, as we are all-too-aware, humans have the capacity to consciously feel pain and to suffer, presumably because these types of experiences have offered evolutionary advantages over mere nociception.  In this panel, we will explore the adaptive value of conscious pain by taking a closer look at what we know about nociception and pain across different classes of animals.  The speakers will discuss innovative methods used for assessing whether nonhuman animals are capable of experiencing pain, looking closely at relevant similarities and differences between species, and will situate our current knowledge in a theoretical framework that emphasizes the adaptive value of conscious pain.

Chair: Adam Shriver

Talk 1. Victoria Braithwaite (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
"Do fish feel pain"

Talk 2. Dan Weary (The University of British Columbia, Canada)
“Experimental design and strength of inferences regarding affect during loss of consciousness”

Talk 3. David Edelman (Bennington College, USA)
“Identifying nociception and the experience of pain in the octopus”

Talk 4. Paula Droege (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
“In defense of function 

 

SYMPOSIUM 3: Quantifying Consciousness: Theoretical and clinical implications  

Summary:

The field of consciousness research has reached a critical turning point: we have begun to validate theory-driven quantitative measures of consciousness (ref. Casali 2013, King 2013, Schurger 2010, Seth 2011) that enable us to discern whether or not a human subject (or patient) is in a conscious state, or is conscious of a particular stimulus, based only on patterns of brain activity. With these advances, consciousness research moves from “neuronal correlates” towards "neuronal signatures" of consciousness. Whereas correlates are apparent in the average over many trials or subjects, a signature can predict whether a single subject is in a conscious state, or whether a single episode elicited a specific conscious sensation, thus moving us one step closer to understanding how consciousness is "implemented" by the brain. Tests capable of detecting consciousness will be of enormous value in both clinical and research settings. A handful of new quantitative measures of consciousness have emerged in recent years. Based on theory, but applicable in practice, these metrics can reliably classify brain states as “conscious” or “non-conscious” at the single-subject, and in some cases single-trial, level. While each is different from the others in important ways, they also appear to be converging on certain specific properties of conscious brain states. In this symposium we will explore these new measures and discuss their theoretical, experimental, and clinical implications.

Chair: Jacobo Sitt and Aaron Schurger

Talk 1. Aaron Schurger (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
"Stability as a signature of neuronal adequacy for subjective report"

Talk 2. Marcello Massimini (The University of Milan, Italy)
“Towards an objective index of the level of consciousness”

Talk 3. Jacobo Sitt (L'Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, France)
“Insights and applications from contrasting conscious states”

Talk 4. Anil Seth (University of Sussex, UK)
“Quantitative measures of conscious level: prospects and perils”

 

SYMPOSIUM 4: Consciousness in sleep: what it is like, what can it tell us, and how it can be measured

Summary:

It has been known for some time that the level of consciousness fades away in deep sleep early in the night, only to return in the form of vivid dreams late in the night. However, it is now clear that dream reports can be obtained during any stage of sleep, and conversely, some awakenings can yield no report, even from REM sleep, raising the question of how changes in brain activity relate to changes in level of consciousness. To start addressing this question, in this symposium we will present novel experiments that combine high density EEG, TMS and fMRI, and show how a refined spatial and temporal analysis can help identifying regionally specific predictors of dreaming and indicate, in real time, whether dream reports will be obtained. We will conclude by discussing why dreams are interesting for the philosophy of consciousness, and propose specific experimental approaches that can build a stronger connection between dream research and philosophy of mind.

Chair: Chiara Cirelli

Talk 1. Chiara Cirelli (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
"Neurophysiology of sleep"

Talk 2. Francesca Siclari (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
“Assessing sleep consciousness within subjects using a serial awakening paradigm and high-density EEG 

Talk 3. Michael Czisch (Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Germany)
“Sleep, dreams and consciousness: A neuroimaging perspective”

Talk 4. Thomas Metzinger/Jennifer Windt (Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany; Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany)
“Dreaming, consciousness and the self: Spatiotemporal self- location and minimal phenomenal selfhood”

ASSC 18 - Travel and local information

 

General Brisbane Transport Information

 

TransLink runs nearly all public transport in Brisbane. Their website [LINK] is full of information about timetables and fairs, as well as a journey planner to find the best way to get from A to B.

 

GoCards are the primary method of public transport payment and are similar to London’s Oyster card and other smart card transport systems. Cards can be preloaded with credit and simply swiped at designated readers when entering and exiting public transport. See the TransLink website [LINK] for more details.

 

The two major taxi companies in Brisbane are Black and White Cabs [LINK]  (131 008) and Yellow Cabs [LINK] (131 924) .

AirTrain [LINK] is a train service connecting Brisbane airport with inner-city Brisbane. Stops at Central Station (CBD) and South Bank allow easy transfer to a direct bus route to UQ.

 

A variety of Car Hire Services are available at or close to the airport.

Parking at UQ costs depending on where you park. There are both short and long term parking areas and availability shouldn’t be a problem as the conference is being held during the mid-year break.

 

 

Brisbane and Surrounds

 

Brisbane is the capital city of Queensland, and lies between the Sunshine Coast in the North and the Gold Coast in the South.  It is one of the most desirable destinations in Australia, due to it’s warm climate, and its location near to tropical islands, beaches and world heritage rainforest.  Brisbane city has a laidback out-door feel and is easily commutable by train, bus or ferry.  The city is a cultural hub with live music, world-class art exhibitions, a variety of restaurants and a lively nightlife.

 

 

 

 

For more information:

BRISBANE: www.brisbanecityonline.com.au/about_brisbane.htm

THE GREAT BARRIER REEF: www.greatbarrierreef.org/

FRASER ISLAND: www.fraserisland.net

MORETON ISLAND: www.visitmoretonisland

LAMMINGTON NATIONAL PARK: www.oreillys.com.au/

BYRON BAY: www.byron-bay.com/


ASSC 18 Accommodation

General Information

The University campus is located approximately 30min from the city centre by public transport. For this reason we highly recommend people take advantage of the college accomodation which is convenient and cheap (particularly if you consider the price includes breakfast and will not require any public transport).

 

 

College Accommodation

 

Accommodation on campus at UQ close to the conference venue (Advanced Engineering Building) is available at two colleges from the 16th to the 19th of July, with final checkout the morning of the 20th. Bookings can be made directly with Anne Kuskopf (conferences@womens.uq.edu.au) by downloading and completing [the booking form].

 

Women’s College

http://www.womens.uq.edu.au/conference-accommodation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Duchesne College

http://www.uq.edu.au/duchesne/venue_hire.htm

 

 


 

 

 

Other Accommodation with Easy Access to UQ

 

South Bank is a popular Brisbane destination located opposite the central business district on the Brisbane River. The area has many restaurants and is a major cultural precinct containing the Gallery of Modern Art, Queensland Museum and the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre. Public transport is close by with train, ferry and bus stations. Bus 66 and the St Lucia ferry go straight to UQ’s Campus from the South Bank bus station and ferry terminal respectively. By car UQ is about 15min away.  

The two main hotels in South Bank are Rydges (click here for information) and Mantra (click here for information)

 

Brisbane CBD is the city centre and the major hub for public transport. Buses 66, 411 and 412 go directly to UQ’s campus, and is approximately 15min away from UQ by car.

 

ASSC Room Share Forum

This year we are not offering a room share forum because the cheapest option is the college accommodation which are rooms with single beds and therefore cannot be shared. There are hostels and other accommodation in the city but we advise against these as they are located approximately 30minutes from the university and will require additional public transport tickets.

 

 

 


Election 2013

Voting closes Friday 13th December 2013

To access the voting pages you will need to be logged in. If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password".

Please note that only Full-Voting Members are eligible to vote. If you recieved an email notifying you of this election, then you are a Full-Voting Member. If you have any questions about your membership profile or if you have difficulty logging in, please contact the ASSC Secretary. If you have any other questions regarding the election please email the ASSC Director.

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We thank you in advance for your time and consideration given to this election.

Jobs

To add an item to the ASSC Jobs Board (currently in beta) please email the Executive Director

1) POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS: Rhythmic dynamics of visual perception and attention 

Location: Toulouse (France) Starting date: Flexible (2014) 

Two postdoctoral positions are available to work in collaboration with Rufin VanRullen at the CerCo in Toulouse, France, as part of a recently funded ERC project. The project investigates rhythmic aspects of visual perception, attention and awareness, using a combination of psychophysical, neuro-imaging (EEG, fMRI, TMS) and computational tools. Successful applicants will have prior experience with at least one of the above-mentioned experimental techniques, and a demonstrated interest in vision and/or attention; some programming experience is also desirable. More information about research in the lab can be found at http://www.cerco.ups-tlse.fr/~rufin/.

French language is not a requirement but a willingness to learn would be beneficial. Net salary ranges between 1,850 Euros and 2,350 Euros per month, commensurate with experience. The initial appointment is one year, and can easily be renewed for up to two more years. Additional information about the research environment in Toulouse can be viewed at http://www.cerco.ups-tlse.fr/fr_vers/cerco_eng/  Applications should be sent to Rufin VanRullen (rufin-lab@cerco.ups-tlse.fr), and should include a detailed CV including publication list, a brief statement about research interests, and the names of 2 references. Applications will be considered until the position is filled. Informal inquiries can also be made at any time to the same email address. 

Rufin VanRullen. 

Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, CNRS UMR 5549, 

Pavillon Baudot, Hopital Purpan, 

31052 Toulouse Cedex, France. 

http://www.cerco.ups-tlse.fr/~rufin/

ASSC 20

THE 20th ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSC WILL BE HELD IN BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA, 2016

LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE 

Tristan Bekinschtein (Chair)
Agustin Ibanez
Facundo Manes
Mariano Sigman


Further details will be announced on this page as they become available

Program Book

Download the Program Book  (Right-click on the link and select "Save as...")

(Please see Poster Sessions: Addendum (Errata) for updated corrections, omissions, etc.)

ASSC 17 - Registration - Non-Members - Early

INSTRUCTIONS

1) Select each of the items that you would like below and press "ADD TO CART." This will automatically load the PayPal page showing your selection.

2) If you would like to add more items, select "CONTINUE SHOPPING" and add your additional choices.

3) Once you have chosen all of your items,  select "CHECKOUT" if you would like to pay with a credit card or "CHECKOUT WITH PAYPAL" if you would like to use a PaPal account.

4) If the name you provide with your payment details is different than the name you would like printed on your name tag (or the name listed on your abstract), please notify assc17info@gmail.com AFTER you have completed your payment so that your payment/registration details can be accurately recorded.

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ASSC 17 Meeting Registration Fee for Non-Members (July 12th-15th) -

Early Registration (By May 20th, 2013*) - $575.00 US:

*Payments received after June 12th will not be refundable. Refunds made prior to June 12th will be subject to a 15% processing fee.

 


Optional Morning Tutorials (9:00am-12:00pm, July 12th) - $60.00 US each (you can only select 1 morning and/or 1 afternoon tutorial):

TUTORIAL M1 - 9:00am: Using Bayes to Interpret Non-significant Results
Zoltan Dienes


TUTORIAL M2 - 9:00AM:
Integrated Information, Predictive Coding, and Qualia
Anil Seth & Ryota Kanai


TUTORIAL M3 - 9:00
AM: First-Person Methods: Philosophers' Dreams or Researchers' Nightmares? Perspectives from Philosophy and the Study of Dreaming
Jennifer M. Windt & Sascha Benjamin Fink


TUTORIAL M4 - 9:00
AM: Measuring (Un)awareness
David Carmel & Steve Fleming 


Optional Afternoon Tutorials (1:00pm-4:00pm, July 12th)- $60.00 US each (you can only select 1 morning and/or 1 afternoon tutorial):

TUTORIAL A1 - 1:00PM: Investigating Animal Pain and Consciousness
Paula Droege & Victoria Braithwaite


TUTORIAL A2 - 1:00PM:
Representational Theories of Consciousness
Rocco Gennaro


TUTORIAL A3 - 1:00PM:
The Integrated Information Theory of Consciousness
Giulio Tononi, Christof Koch, Nao Tsuchiya & Masafumi Oizumi

***SOLD OUT***


TUTORIAL A4 - 1:00PM:
Deciphering the information contained in patterns of human brain activity
Frank Tong 


Optional Satellite Symposium - Perception and Action in Immersive Worlds (July 16th) - $60.00 US:

This is a satellite event that is independent of the main ASSC17 conference.


Optional Meeting Banquet (July 14th) - $90.00 US*:

The perfect way to relax after a big day, and an ideal chance to meet other conference participants. The food will be delicious, the company brilliant.

*Includes beer and wine served during dinner.


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Inquiries: If you are having difficulties please contact assc17info@gmail.com

ASSC 17 Poster and Talk Criteria

POSTER COMPOSITION AND DIMENSIONS

Poster Composition: All posters should include the following: 1) A title in large type with author names and affiliations clearly printed below; 2) the abstract as originally submitted for review; 3) a brief introduction describing the nature and/or history of the problem under investigation; 4) a clear summary of results if the poster is presenting new scientific research; and 5) conclusions in the form of bullet points or a concise descriptive paragraph. Wherever possible, the use of figures and tables is strongly encouraged.

Poster Format: All posters should be printed in landscape format. 

Poster Size: The maximum dimensions for posters are 72 inches wide x 44 inches high (or 182.8 cm. wide x 110 cm. high).

 

TALK LENGTH, A/V PROVISIONS, AND MODE OF PRESENTATION

Concurrent Talk Length: The maximum time allotted for each talk is 20 minutes (including discussion). Speakers should aim to complete their talk in 15 minutes to allow 3-4 minutes for questions and speaker transition time.

On-Site A/V Equipment: High-definition video projectors will be available in every venue space allotted for talks. Though in most cases a house laptop will be available, we urge speakers to bring their own computers. Provisions for audio output will also be available. 

Mode of Presentation: Although virtually any presentation format would probably be acceptable, we would strongly recommend the most commonly available formats: Powerpoint and Keynote.

ASSC 17 Tutorials

Tutorials - July 12

Morning (0900-1200):

M1: Using Bayes to interpret non-significant results

Zoltan Dienes (School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, U.K.)

The purpose of the tutorial is to present simple tools for dealing with non-significant results. In particular, people will be taught how to apply Bayes Factors to draw meaningful inferences from non-significant data, using free easy-to-use on-line software: Software which allows one to determine whether there is strong evidence for the null and against one’s theory, or if the data are just insensitive, a distinction p-values cannot make. These tools have greater flexibility than power calculations and allow null results to be interpreted over a wider range of situations. Such tools should allow the publication of null results to become easier.

While the tools will be of interest to all scientists, they are especially relevant to researchers interested in the conscious/unconscious distinction, because inferring a mental state is unconscious often rests on affirming a null result. For example, for perception to be below an objective threshold, discrimination about stimulus properties must be at chance. Similarly, for perception to be below a subjective threshold by the zero correla- tion criterion, ability to discriminate one’s own accuracy must be at chance. To interpret a non-significant result, what is needed is a non-arbitrary specification of the distribution of discrimination abilities given conscious knowledge. Conventional statistics cannot solve this problem, but Bayes Factors provide an easy simple solution. The solution is vital for progress in the field, as so many conclusions of unconscious mental states rely on null results with no indication of whether the non-significant result is purely due to data insensitivity.

M2: Integrated information, predictive coding, and qualia

Anil. K. Seth & Ryota Kanai (Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science and Dep’t of Informatics, University of Sussex, Brighton, U.K.)

Current research in consciousness science must better integrate theory and experiment in developing our understanding of qualia [1]. Two classes of brain theory are now emerging as leading candidates. Integrated information theory (IIT, [2]) proposes that consciousness has to do with the amount of information generated by a neural system as a whole, compared to the sum of its parts. Integrated information (‘phi’) can be operational- ized as a variant of dynamical complexity and compared with similar measures [3,4]. IIT thus highlights informa- tion theory and complexity as key tools for naturalizing consciousness and qualia. Predictive coding (PC) proposes that perception emerges via Bayesian inference: Perceptual content is determined top-down predictive signals arising from generative models of external causes, which are continually modified by bottom-up prediction-error signals [5]. PC thus highlights re-entrant processing and probabilistic inference as key concepts. While both frameworks are powerfully explanatory, IIT is underconstrained by current cognitive neuroscience and difficult to test, while for PC the relationship between conscious and unconscious perception is poorly specified. In this tutorial, we will first provide basic introduction to IIT and PC with special emphasis on their relationship to understanding qualia. To facilitate interdisciplinary discussion, the tutorial does not assume any mathematical background and we will focus on conceptual understanding of the theories rather than math- ematical details. In a later part of the tutorial, we will discuss how these different frameworks might be synthesized into a coherent computational framework.

M3: First-person methods: Philosophers' dreams or researchers' nightmares? Perspectives from philosophy and the study of dreaming

Jennifer M. Windt (Dep’t of Philosophy, University of Mainz, DE) & Sascha B. Fink (Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück, DE)

The best way to learn about the specific character of conscious experience is to study what people say about it. Fundamental features of consciousness (e.g. holistic integration, phenomenal embodiment, specious presence, etc.) were only established as targets for consciousness research through first-person methods. Most agree that such methods are indispensable for consciousness studies. At the same time, phenomena such as change blindness suggest that first-person access to phenomenality is not perfect. First-person reports can be confabulated, contradictory, or incomplete. This calls the validity of first-person approaches into question. Apparently, we need first-person reports – but how far can we trust them?

Dreams illustrate the problem of first-person reports in a compelling manner. Because dreams are largely decoupled from sensory input and behavioral output, dream researchers rely almost exclusively on dream reports. At the same time, dream reports have often been taken to be particularly unreliable, occasionally leading to outright skepticism regarding the experiential character of dreaming. Despite these theoretical disagreements, however, dream research is a thriving field and can provide a fresh perspective on problems

The tutorial has four goals: (1) Provide an introduction to the basic problems raised by first-person reports using the example of dreaming, (2) suggest specific consequences from the philosophical debate on dream- ing for the use of first-person reports in consciousness research, (3) discuss philosophical positions on the validity of first-person reports and the reliability of introspection, and (4) discuss the role and value of the researcher’s own experience.

M4: Measuring (un)awareness

David Carmel (Dep’t of Psychology, University of Edinburgh) & Steve Fleming (Center for Neural Science, New York University)

Most research on perceptual awareness attempts to understand consciousness by investigating the twin themes of conscious and unconscious perception – i.e., what perceptual processes are associated with conscious experience and what can be accomplished in the absence of awareness. There is, however, a great deal of confusion regarding how to assess and measure each of these modes of perceptual processing. This tutorial will offer researchers at all levels an overview of pertinent methodological and conceptual issues, leaving participants with an understanding of the questions they need to consider when designing studies, and how the answers to these questions constrain the conclusions that can be drawn from research findings. For unconscious perception, the questions that will be discussed include how to ensure suppression of percep- tual stimuli from awareness, how to decide which suppression technique is most appropriate for a specific research question, and whether different kinds of unconscious processing indicate similar neural underpin- nings.

For conscious processing, the questions that will be addressed are how to measure the level and extent of subjective conscious experience, whether different ways of assessing reports of awareness (confidence, appearance, wagering) address equivalent constructs, and how detection and identification of perceptual stimuli differ.

Several demonstrations will clarify the issues that will be discussed, and generous provision for discussion will be made to allow consideration of specific problems or issues arising in participants’ own research.

Afternoon (1300-1600):

A1: Investigating animal pain and consciousness

Paula Droege (Dep't of Philosophy, Pennsylvania State University)

Neuroscientists have been making remarkable progress in identifying candidates for the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in humans. Through careful investigation of conscious and unconscious processes, the role of thalamocortical circuits and information integration in the production of consciousness is becoming clearer. But what about non-human animals? How can we apply the advances in consciousness research to animals (e.g. fish, cephalopods) that share few if any human physical and functional structures? The capacity to represent the current environment in contrast to the past and future is essential for consciousness and marks an important development in cognitive skill. We suggest this capacity for temporal representation can bring together physiological and behavioral evidence to help determine which animals are conscious and which are not.

The tutorial will begin with a discussion of the problems and prospects for research on animal consciousness, considering such questions as: Is nociception sufficient for pain? What is the relation between consciousness and self-consciousness? Then we will review several research paradigms designed to assess consciousness in animals. One important question here is: When is an explanation in terms of higher-level processes such as consciousness and cognition simpler than an explanation in terms of associative conditioning?

A2: Representational theories of consciousness

Rocco J. Gennaro (Dep’t of Philosophy, University of Southern Indiana)

The notion of ‘representation’ is central to many philosophical theories of consciousness and also figures importantly in psychology and neuroscience. Some questions raised by the role of representation in these fields are: What does it mean to say that a mental state is ‘representational’? What is the difference between a first-order representation and a higher-order (or meta-) representation? This tutorial will begin with a discus- sion of how the concept ‘representation’ is used in the philosophical literature on consciousness. In addition, various senses of ‘conscious’ are distinguished and explained. The key question then becomes: What makes a mental state a conscious mental state? We shall survey a number of leading representational theories of consciousness found in the current literature: First-Order Representational Theory of Consciousness (Tye), Higher-Order Perception (HOP) Theory (Lycan), Higher-Order Thought (HOT) Theory (Rosenthal), Dual Content Theory (Carruthers), and Self-Representational Theory (Kriegel). After the main tenets of each approach are presented, we shall discuss the arguments for and against the theory in question. Significant attention will be paid to well-known objections to each theory, for example, the problem of misrepresentation, the question of animal consciousness, and how these theories might address the “hard problem” of consciousness. Finally, there will be some discussion of how these models might be realized in the brain. Also important is the reduc- tionist motive of most representational theorists: Can any of these theories offer a viable reductionist account of consciousness?

A3: The Integrated Information theory of consciousness

Giulio Tononi (Dep’t of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin), Christof Koch (Cognitive and Behavioral Biology, Cal Tech; CSO, Allen Institute for Brain Science), Nao Tsuchiya (Monash University, Melbourne, AU) & Masafumi Oizumi (Dep’t of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin)

The Integrated Information theory of consciousness (IIT) has recently attracted attention among conscious- ness researchers. IIT stems from thought experiments that lead to phenomenological axioms and onto- logical postulates (information, integration, exclusion, and compositionality). According to IIT, an experi- ence is an integrated information structure, which in principle can be completely characterized, both in quantity and quality, by determining to what extent a system of causal mechanisms is irreducible to its parts. Many observations concerning the neural substrate of consciousness fall naturally into place within the IIT framework. Among them are the association of consciousness with certain neural systems rather than with others; the fact that neural processes underlying consciousness can influence or be influenced by neural processes that remain unconscious; the reduction of consciousness during dreamless sleep and generalized epileptic seizures; and the distinct role of different cortical architectures in affecting the quality of experience. The tutorial will i) introduce the basic notions of IIT to a broad audience without requiring a mathematical background, and provide hands-on examples in which integrated information can be computed rigorously; ii) introduce measures of integrated information that can be applied to empirical data and discuss how they can be applied to evaluate the level of consciousness in wake, sleep, anesthesia, and disorders of consciousness; iii) demonstrate how integrated information grows in animats adapting to a complex environment, thereby shedding light on the evolution of consciousness; iv) consider theoretical and practical aspects of measures of integrated information, potential problems, and future developments.

Our intended audience is broad. We do not assume any prior knowledge of integrated information theory or information theory in general. In the first part of the tutorial, we start from the basics of the probability theory and information theory, which are key to understanding the theory. After the introduction of the basics, the contents of the tutorial will be at the level of a master class.

 

A4: Deciphering the information contained in patterns of human brain activity

Frank Tong (Dep’t of Psychology, Vanderbilt University)

Surprisingly detailed information about visual and mental states can be decoded from non-invasive mea- sures of human brain activity. Brain decoding approaches have successfully revealed what a person is seeing, perceiving, attending to, or remembering. Multidimensional models can further be used to investi- gate how the brain encodes complex visual scenes or abstract semantic information, and to reconstruct the stimulus that was viewed. Such feats of “brain reading” or “mind reading”, though impressive, raise impor- tant conceptual, methodological, as well as ethical issues. What does successful decoding reveal about the sensory or cognitive functions performed by a brain region? How should brain signals be spatially selected and mathematically combined, to ensure that decoding reflects inherent computations of the brain rather than those performed by the decoder? What ethical considerations might emerge with the advancement of these methodologies? The tutorial will cover the fundamentals of “brain reading”, and should be suitable for people from a broad range of backgrounds, with one component emphasizing the more technical and mathematical aspects of pattern classification. Questions and interactive discussion will be emphasized, especially when considering the strengths and limitations of fMRI pattern analysis methods.

ASSC 17 and the 5D Institute Present: Perception and Action in Immersive Worlds

 

July 16, 2013 (9:00-16:00)


A Satellite Symposium Highlighting the Emerging Interface Between the Realms

of Human Perception and Action and Cutting-Edge Interactive and Immersive Media

5D Institute Logo for ASSC 17 Satellite

 

This special ASSC 17 Satellite Symposium is made possible through the generous support of:

Chairs

Sergei Gepshtein, PhD, Center for Neurobiology of Vision, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Alex McDowell, RDI, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California

This one-day symposium will celebrate and promote the rapidly growing interaction between two communities: researchers engaged in the scientific study of human perception and action and practitioners of interactive and immersive narrative media technologies. Leading researchers and artists will discuss human behavior and conscious experience vis-à-vis physical, social, and imagined realities represented in purely virtual worlds, as well as in the 'mixed' worlds that interlace physical and virtual realities.

The symposium will comprise a series of sessions, each featuring two speakers: a scientist and an artist or immersive-reality practitioner. The speakers will first present their approaches and then review both existing and prospective links between their domains of expertise. Following each session, generous time will be devoted to questions from the audience.

Speakers

Thomas D. Albright

Director, Vision Center Laboratory and Conrad T. Prebys Chair in Vision Research, Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Nonny de la Peña

Fellow, Interactive Media Arts Department, USC; Documentary Filmmaker and Journalist

Sergei Gepshtein

Center for the Neurobiology of Vision, Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Perry Hoberman

Center for Stereoscopic 3D, School for Cinematic Arts, USC

Donald Hoffman

Cognitive Sciences, University of California, Irvine

Michael Kubovy

Department of Psychology, University of Virginia

Greg Lynn

Architecture and Urban Design, UCLA; Principal, Greg Lynn Form

Alex McDowell

Director, World Building Media Lab and Creative Director, 5D Institute, School of Cinematic Arts, USC

Howard Poizner

Institute for Neural Computation, UCSD

About the speakers

 

 


ASSC 17 Symposia

July 13th (1030-1230):

The role of prefrontal cortex in conscious experience

Chair: Richard Brown (Dep’t of Philosophy, CUNY)

One major divide in consciousness theory is that between higher-order and first-order theories. Inter- preted anatomically, first-order theories of consciousness maintain that consciousness will depend on the activity in the sensory cortices alone while higher-order theories deny that and maintain that consciousness will be reflected, at least in part, in activity of higher-order areas of the brain, most likely frontal-parietal regions.

Virtually all theories of consciousness have a stake in this debate. For instance, besides higher-order thought, and self representational views, Global Workspace Theory, and Information Integration Theory can be seen as versions of higher-order theory in that they posit a role for prefrontal areas in conscious perception, at least in some cases. Also in addition to first-order representation views, recurrent feedback, and attention-based theories can all be seen as versions of the first-order view.

This symposium will bring together two neuroscientists and two philosophers to present the empirical and philosophical case for and against the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in conscious experience.

  • Local neuronal “ignitions” and perceptual awareness
    Rafi Malach (Dep’t of Neurobiology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Tel Aviv, IL)
  • Three Problems for Higher-Order Thought Theories
    Joseph Levine (Dep’t of Philosophy, U. Massachusetts, Amherst)
  • Higher order attentional contributions to subjective perception
    Dobromir Rahnev (Dep’t of Philosophy, U. California, Berkeley)
  • Consciousness without first-order representations
    Richard Brown (Dep’t of Philosophy, CUNY)

July 14th (1030-1230):

Projecting bodily consciousness: How the body affects consciousness in personal, peripersonal and interpersonal space

Chairs: Olaf Blanke (Cognitive Neuroscience, Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne, CH),
Thomas Metzinger (Dep’t of Philosophy, Universität Mainz, DE)

Philosophy of mind, cognitive neuroscience, and neurology stress the importance of bodily input in forming of the experience of self and person. Such bodily aspects of self-consciousness have been shown to arise from the complex integration of interoceptive and exteroceptive body-related signals. An intrigu- ing aspect of bodily self consciousness is that it is not limited to the body itself, but also depends on stimuli related to external objects and in turn influences the experience of the external world. In this sense, bodily self-consciousness extends beyond the limits of our body over the space around us (i.e. peripersonal space) and impacts the interaction with other humans.

The presentations of this symposium will highlight complementary findings from multisensory, motor, and affective approaches and discuss their relavance for self-consciousness. Roy Salomon will focus on how bodily information, that has been shown to alter self-consciousness, can also modulate visual consciousness.

Andrea Serino will show how the boundaries of peripersonal space adapt when interacting with objects and others. Federique de Vignemont will extend the notion of embodiment to the study of social interactions and intersubjectivity.

  • Body-building-awareness: Bodily factors shaping our consciousness
    Roy Salomon (Cognitive Neuroscience, Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne, CH)
  • Spatial boundaries of Body-self Consciousness
    Andrea Serino (Cognitive Neuroscience, U. Bologna, IT )
  • Seeing other people’s bodies
    Frédérique de Vignemont (Dep’t of Philosophy, Institut Jean Nicod/CNRS, Paris, FR)

July 15th (0930-1130):

Beyond the contrastive method: How to separate the neural correlates of consciousness from its precursors and consequences

Chair: Lucia Melloni (Dep’t of Neurophysiology, MPI Frankfurt, DE/Columbia University)

The most prevalent approach to study the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) today is to contrast conditions in which conscious perception occurs with conditions in which it does not. Here, conscious- ness is treated as the dependent variable and then correlated with brain activity. This “contrastive method” has brought about important insights into the NCC. However, despite this apparently straight- forward approach, results are inconclusive and contradictory (e.g., it is still debated whether the NCC occurs early or late, or whether it is expressed in local or distributed brain activity). This discord can be understood when considering a methodological pitfall in the contrastive method: The contrast between conscious perception and unconscious processing confounds the NCC with processes that necessarily precede and follow conscious perception (pre-NCC and post-NCC, respectively) without directly contrib- uting to subjective experience.

It is not straightforward to arbitrate which previous results address the NCC-proper and which reflect other processes. In this symposium we will outline the shortcomings of the contrastive analysis, put forward a new taxonomy that differentiates the processes besetting the NCC- proper, and propose novel experimental approaches to dissociate the NCC-proper from its antecedents and consequences. We review M-EEG and ECOG studies that have employed these new approaches to probe which neural process directly correspond to the NCC. This evidence suggests that previous results may have indeed missed the NCC and reported pre-NCC/post-NCCs. Finally, we will discuss how this new taxonomy relates to prevalent theories of consciousness, arguing that some theories might be about post-NCCs instead of NCC.

  • Distilling the Neural Correlates of Consciousness
    Lucia Melloni (Dep’t of Neurophysiology, MPI Frankfurt/Columbia University)
  • Using MEG to track conscious access and its non-conscious consequences
    Stanislas Dehaene, Lucie Charles (Inserm-CEA Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, Paris, FR)
  • Isolating NCCs that are necessary and sufficient for visual awareness
    Michael Pitts (Dep’t of Psychology, Reed College)
  • Core vs. Total NCC
    Ned Block (Dep’t of Philosophy, New York University)

July 15th (1630-1830):

Ethical implications of detecting covert awareness in disorders of consciousness

Chairs: Adrian M. Owen (Cognitive Neuroscience and Imaging, Western University, Ontario, CA),
Andrew Peterson (Rotman Institute of Philosophy, Western University, Ontario, CA)

Recent findings in cognitive neuroscience (Monti et al .2010, Owen et al.2006) suggest that functional mag- netic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be a viable means for detecting covert awareness in the vegetative state (VS). This research opens a promising new avenue for developing brain-computer interfaces (Naci et al. 2012) that compliment the current diagnostic criteria of disorders of consciousness (DOC), thereby increasing the effectiveness of diagnostic screening in this patient group. Given the high rate of misdiagno- sis in this population (Andrews et al. 1996, Childs et al. 1993), actively seeking out patients, who retain conscious awareness despite a clinical diagnosis of VS, is of the highest importance. Moreover, this tech- nique may also permit patients, who are consciously aware and have high levels of preserved cognition, to meaningfully engage in the decision making process related to their own medical care. To date, one patient, previously diagnosed as vegetative for approximately five years, was able to successfully answer a series of autobiographical ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions correctly overrepeated fMRI scanning sessions (Montietal.2010).

A natural step forward in this research program, therefore, is to apply similar neuroimaging methods to address medical questions relevant to individual DOC patients (Peterson et al. in preparation). Though these scientific findings appear highly promising in principle, incorporating any neuroimaging--based method into clinical setting will require satisfaction of established ethical and legal norms of medical practice. In particular, these concerns include: determining how information acquired from such techniques will be disclosed to patients’ families, what the cost of running such tests will be, whether any individual DOC patient is capable of making medically relevant decisions with these techniques, and what type of ques- tions we ought to be asking this patient population. We propose a symposium that brings together three different perspectives on this problem: neuroscience, neurology, and clinical ethics.

The first perspective, offered by Drs. Lorina Naci PhD and Daniel Bor PhD, both neuroscientists working with these neuroimaging paradigms, will shed light on practical obstacles and ways forward focusing neuroimaging to assess residual cognition in DOC patients.

The second perspective, offered by Dr. Bryan Young MD, a clinical neurologist working directly with this patient group, will highlight the difficulties as well as the potential that neuroim- aging holds for DOC patients in the medical setting.

Finally, Dr. Charles Weijer MD, PhD and Andrew Peterson MA, both medical ethicists and philosophers of science, will offer views on the overarching ethical standards relevant to this research. Dr. Adrian M. Owen, a neuroscientist working in this field, will chair the session.

We hope that this interdisciplinary approach will facilitate a novel and productive conversation about the merits of this research and future directions for using it in the clinical setting.

  • Using fMRI to assess conscious awareness in patients with disorders of consciousness– practical considerations
    Lorina Naci (Experimental Psychology, Western University, Ontario, CA)
  • Using multiple neuroimaging techniques to assess the quality of conscious awareness in DOC patients
    Daniel Bor (Cognitive Neuroscience, Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex, Brighton, U.K.)
  • Obstacles at the interface between advances in cognitive neuroscience and clinical practice
    Bryan Young (Neurology and Critical Care Medicine, Western University, Ontario, CA)
  • Conceptual foundations for assessing decision-making capacity in disorders of consciousness
    Andrew Peterson (Rotman Institute of Philosophy, Western University, Ontario, CA)
  • Navigating the transition between research and treatment when integrating novel neuroimaging techniques in medical practice
    Charles Weijer (Bioethics, Rotman Institute of Philosophy, Western University, Ontario, CA)

ASSC 17 - Registration - Non-Members

INSTRUCTIONS

1) Select each of the items that you would like below and press "ADD TO CART." This will automatically load the PayPal page showing your selection.

2) If you would like to add more items, select "CONTINUE SHOPPING" and add your additional choices.

3) Once you have chosen all of your items,  select "CHECKOUT" if you would like to pay with a credit card or "CHECKOUT WITH PAYPAL" if you would like to use a PaPal account.

4) If the name you provide with your payment details is different than the name you would like printed on your name tag (or the name listed on your abstract), please notify assc17info@gmail.com AFTER you have completed your payment so that your payment/registration details can be accurately recorded.

PLEASE NOTE:

You do not need a PayPal account to make a payment; simply follow the instructions to pay with or without a PayPal account.

You will need to add each item to your cart separately, so please do not proceed to payment until ALL items are listed.


ASSC 17 Conference (July 12th-15th) Registration Fee for Non-Members -

Registration - $675.00 US:

*Payments received after June 12th will not be refundable. Refunds made prior to June 12th will be subject to a 15% processing fee.

 


Optional Morning Tutorials (9:00am-12:00pm, July 12th) - $60.00 US each (you can only select 1 morning and/or 1 afternoon tutorial):

TUTORIAL M1 - 9:00am: Using Bayes to Interpret Non-significant Results
Zoltan Dienes


TUTORIAL M2 - 9:00AM:
Integrated Information, Predictive Coding, and Qualia
Anil Seth & Ryota Kanai


TUTORIAL M3 - 9:00
AM: First-Person Methods: Philosophers' Dreams or Researchers' Nightmares? Perspectives from Philosophy and the Study of Dreaming
Jennifer M. Windt & Sascha Benjamin Fink


TUTORIAL M4 - 9:00
AM: Measuring (Un)awareness
David Carmel & Steve Fleming 


Optional Afternoon Tutorials (1:00pm-4:00pm, July 12th)- $60.00 US each (you can only select 1 morning and/or 1 afternoon tutorial):

TUTORIAL A1 - 1:00PM: Investigating Animal Pain and Consciousness
Paula Droege & Victoria Braithwaite


TUTORIAL A2 - 1:00PM:
Representational Theories of Consciousness
Rocco Gennaro


TUTORIAL A3 - 1:00PM:
The Integrated Information Theory of Consciousness
Giulio Tononi, Christof Koch, Nao Tsuchiya & Masafumi Oizumi

*** SOLD OUT ***

TUTORIAL A4 - 1:00PM: Deciphering the information contained in patterns of human brain activity
Frank Tong 


Optional Satellite Symposium - Perception and Action in Immersive Worlds (July 16th) - $60.00 US:

This is a satellite event that is independent of the main ASSC17 conference.


Optional Meeting Banquet (July 14th) - $90.00 US*:

The perfect way to relax after a big day, and an ideal chance to meet other conference participants. The food will be delicious, the company brilliant.

*Includes beer and wine served during dinner.


View your shopping cart:


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Inquiries: If you are having difficulties please contact assc17info@gmail.com

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ASSC 17 Registration

  Early Registration fees US$  (Extended to May 20th*) Late Registration fees US$ (After May 20th*)
MAIN ASSC17 MEETING (July 12th-15th)
   
Meeting Registration - ASSC Student Member $225 $325
Meeting Registration - ASSC Member
$475 $575
Meeting Registration - Non-member
$575
$675

Meeting Banquet (optional)

Regular: $90   Student: $25 (includes beer & wine)

Regular: $90   Student: $25 (includes beer & wine)

Tutorials (July 12th, optional)
$60 $60
  
Satellite (July 16th, optional)
 $60 $60

*Please note that all payments received after June 12th will not be refundable. Refunds made prior to June 12th will be subject to a 15% processing fee.

*Link to currency converter

                  ----- CONFERENCE REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS -----

                                      

Conference Registration for STUDENT MEMBERS

Note if you have only just applied for membership you will need to wait a few days for your membership to be processed. You will recieve an email notification once your login account has been created.

  • 1) LOGIN: To access the student member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password".  If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.

  • 2) [Click here to proceed to STUDENT MEMBER registration]


Conference Registration for MEMBERS

Note if you have only just applied for membership you will need to wait a few days for your membership to be processed. You will recieve an email notification once your login account has been created.

  • 1) LOGIN To access the member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password". If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.


Conference Registration for NON-MEMBERS

Note:  If you are not currently a member, but would like to take advantage of the member's discount, please go to our member registration page http://www.theassc.org/join_assc  You will need to allow a few days for the membership to be processed and will be notified once your login account has been created.              

ASSC 17 Abstract Submission

   

The annual ASSC conferences are intended to promote interdisciplinary dialogue in the scientific study of consciousness. ASSC members as well as non-members are encouraged to submit contributions that address current empirical and theoretical issues in the study of consciousness, from the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, medicine, philosophy, computer science, and cognitive ethology. ASSC17 will provide an excellent opportunity for the presentation of new empirical findings or novel theoretical perspectives in an atmosphere that will promote discussion and debate.

The program committee invites submissions for poster presentations on any topic relevant to the scientific study of consciousness. Neuroscientific, anthropological, clinical, evolutionary, psychological, philosophical, or computational perspectives are all welcome. Any person may present only one submission, but may be co-author on more than one. Currently, only submissions for posters are being accepted. We would, however, like you to be aware that there are a limited number of poster spaces available. Posters will be selected on the basis of highest quality and relevance to the aims of the ASSC.

All presenters must register for the conference (registration and payment can be made after acceptance notification has been received).  Please note that author names will be stripped from submissions prior to review by the committee to encourage fair evaluation (committee chairs will however have access to this information).

Please note that, due to the limited time and space available, we will not be able to accept all abstract submissions. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this restriction may cause.

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HOW TO SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT

You will be asked to provide:

  • Title
  • Abstract of up to 250 words.
  • Presenting Author Name and Email
  • Name and affiliation for all authors (including presenting author).
  • Track (Neuroscience, Psychology, Philosophy, Clinical or other).

Again, the maximum time allotted for each talk is 20 minutes (including discussion). Speakers should aim to complete their talk in 15 minutes to allow 3-4 minutes for questions and speaker transition time. High-definition video projectors will be available in every venue space allotted for talks. Provisions for audio output will also be available. Though in most cases a house laptop will be available, we urge speakers to bring their own computers. Although virtually any presentation format would probably be acceptable, we would strongly recommend the most commonly available formats: Powerpoint and Keynote

Please note that, due to the limited time and space available, we will not be able to accept all abstract submissions. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this restriction may cause.

 

Submit Your Abstract Now

 

ABSTRACT JUDGING CRITERIA

In line with practices at some recent ASSC conferences, abstracts will be judged by the scientific committee "blind" to the list of contributing authors. The abstracts will be judged soley on the quality of the work presented in the abstract and its relevance to consciousness research. Submissions labeled as "POSTER ONLY" will be considered separately and will simply be judged on a decision to accept or reject. The remaining submissions labeled as either "TALK ONLY" or "TALK OR POSTER" will be judged together ("blind" to the submitting authors indication that the abstract will be withdrawn in a talk is not awarded).

 

TRAVEL AWARD

ASSC17 is seeking funds for travel awards for young scholars (Ph.D. student and postdoc within 3 years of graduation). Please check "yes" if you would like to be considered for an award, should these become available.  We expect to have several travel awards available, in the form of free accommodations at the conference hotel for those students traveling to the conference from outside the San Diego area.

 

EXPRESS REVIEW

SIf you need an express review for acceptance or rejection of the abstract for your visa applications, select "YES"  where the form asks, "Do you need an express review for acceptance or rejection of your abstract for a visa application?"  

NOTE: Express reviews will be conducted as quickly as possible, but as they will require the immediate attention of the reviewing committee, we ask that these requests be limited to only those that need written confirmation of acceptance to the conference in order to apply for a travel visa to the US. No decisions regarding talk or poster slots will be made until the abstract submission period has closed.

 

STUDENT POSTER COMPETITION

For each of the poster sessions, there will be one prize awarded for neuroscience and one prize awarded for philosophy (4 prizes in total). Posters will be categorized by the judges. The four winners will be presented an award on stage just before the final keynote of the conference. The winning posters will also be featured on the ASSC website. The competition is only open to students (post-docs are not eligible).

If you would like to be considered for the student poster competition, then select "YES"  where the form asks, "Would you like to be considered for the student poster prize?"

Note: Prizes will not be awarded for student talk presentations. So, if you select "talk or poster" for your presentation and you are awarded a talk, then you will not be considered for the poster prize.

If you have any questions about the abstract submission process, please contact Tobias Schlicht ( tobias.schlicht@ruhr-uni-bochum.de )

 

POSTER COMPOSITION AND DIMENSIONS

Poster Composition: All posters should include the following: 1) A title in large type with author names and affiliations clearly printed below; 2) the abstract as originally submitted for review; 3) a brief introduction describing the nature and/or history of the problem under investigation; 4) a clear summary of results if the poster is presenting new scientific research; and 5) conclusions in the form of bullet points or a concise descriptive paragraph. Wherever possible, the use of figures and tables is strongly encouraged. 

Poster Format: All posters should be printed in landscape format.

Poster Size: The maximum dimensions for posters are 72 inches wide x 44 inches high (or 182.8 cm. wide x 110 cm. high).

ASSC 19

Home ASSC 19

LOCAL ORGANISING COMMITTEE: Sid Kouider, Elisabeth Pacherie, Catherine Tallon-Baudry 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAMM COMMITTEE:  Sid Kouider, Elisabeth Pacherie, Catherine Tallon-Baudry Jacob Howhy, Susanna Siegel, Frederique de Vignemont, Olivia Carter, Po-Jang Hsieh, Agnes-Melinda Kovacs, Tristan Beckenstein, Lucia Melloni, Steve Flemming, Stanislas Deheane

ASSC 18

   [Abstract Submission]  [Symposia]  [Tutorials]  [Registration]  [Dinner]  [Accommodation]  [Travel & local info]

Local organising committee: Bruno van Swinderen (chair), Derek Arnold, Ross Cunnington

Scientific program committee: Olivia Carter (chair), Sid Kouider, David Chalmers, Nao Tsuchiya, Qiufang Fu, Melanie Boly, Tobias Schlicht, Steve Fleming

Date: July 16th-19th 2014

                       ----------TALK SUBMISSIONS ARE NOW CLOSED --------

----------POSTER SUBMISSIONS WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL AT LEAST APRIL 30th --------

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THE PROGRAM

Keynote speakers:

  • David Chalmers (Australian National University and New York University) 
  • Emery Brown (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
  • Sheng He (University of Minnesota)
  • Melanie Wilke (University Medical Centre Goettingen)
  • Jesse Prinz (City University of New York)

Symposium Speakers:

  • David Carmel (University of Edinburgh, UK)
  • Joel Pearson (The University of New South Wales, Australia)
  • Zoltan Dienes (University of Sussex, UK)
  • Axel Cleeremans (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium)
  • Adam Shriver (The University of Pennsylvania, USA)
  • Victorial Braithwaite (Pennsylvania State University, USA)  
  • Dan Weary (The University of British Columbia, Canada)
  • David Edelman (Bennington College, USA)
  • Paula Droege (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
  • Aaron Schurger (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Marcello Massimini (The University of Milan, Italy)
  • Jacobo Sitt (L'Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, France)
  • Anil Seth (University of Sussex, UK)
  • Chiara Cirelli (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
  • Francesca Siclari (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
  • Michael Czisch (Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Germany)
  • Thomas Metzinger (Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz; Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany)
  • Jennifer Windt (Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany)

Tutorial & Short-Course Presenters:

  • Giulio Tononi (University of Wisconsin, USA)
  • Christof Koch (Allen Institute for Brain Science)
  • Naotsugu Tsuchiya (Monash University, Australia)
  • Masafumi Oizumi (Riken Brain Science Institute, Japan)
  • Larissa Albantakis (University of Wisconsin, USA)
  • Claude Touzet (Aix-Marseille University, France)
  • Colin Hales (The University of Melbourne, Australia)
  • Andreas Keller (The Rockerfeller University, USA)






 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                * Preliminary schedule, may be subject to changes

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THE VENUE

Located on a lush subtropical setting on a bend in the Brisbane River, the University of Queensland is an easy ferry ride from downtown Brisbane, the state capital. July (the Australian winter) is the best season to visit tropical north Queensland and the Great Barrier Reef. The main conference will be held in the Advanced Engineering Building (AEB), which was constructed in 2013.  It is uniquely designed to achieve harmony with the natural environment, reducing energy consumption and attaining certified 5 Star Green ratings.   It houses the  state-of-the-art GHD Auditorium, a 500-seat lecture theatre built in an earthy, timber style with beautiful lake views.

   [Abstract Submission]  [Symposia]  [Tutorials]  [Registration]  [Dinner]  [Accommodation]  [Travel & local info]

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Note that a week following the ASSC conference the international conference on cognitive neuroscience (ICON) will be held in Brisbane from July 27th-31st.  In addition to the conference there are likely to be a number workshops and satellite events that will be of interest to some of you. Check the website for details www.icon2014.org