Public

ASSC After Party

ASSC After Party

 

Friday, July 10th, 7:30pm onwards


Les Caractères, 25 Rue des Grands Augustins, 75006 Paris

about 10 minutes walk from the ASSC venue





Meet up with the ASSC participants for one last drink in the typically ‘Quartier Latin’-ish cellar of the bar Les Caractères.


The bar will be fully booked for the ASSC participants (capacity : 200 persons).


Drinks and planches will be available :

 

  • glass of wine : 3-5€

  • pint of beer : 5-7€ (3-5€ until 8:00pm)

  • cheese and charcuterie for 2 persons : 10€

Poor Man's Pique-nique

 

 

 

Thursday, July 9th, 7:00pm onwards


Pont des Arts

about 10 minutes walk from the ASSC venue





For those who cannot make it to the Gala Dinner…

Let’s act like genuine Parisians, and have cheese & wine on the lovely Pont des Arts !


Please note that this is an informal gathering.

Everyone is kindly invited to bring their own food and drinks, a list of supermarkets will be provided.

 

Alternatively, a list of affordable bars and restaurants in the Saint-Germain-des-Prés district will be provided.

ASSC Student Social

ASSC Student Social

 

 

Wednesday, July 8th, 8:00pm onwards


L’Autobus Impérial, 14 Rue Mondétour, 75001 Paris

Metro Etienne Marcel

15 minutes from the ASSC venue with metro 4





Cocktail party with finger food and drinks offered by the ASSC, for both the students and the non-students.

Classical French bistrot upstairs, club downstairs.

 


Career Panel

 

 

Thursday, July 9th, 12:30am - 1:30pm


ASSC venue, 45 rue des Saints-Pères, 75006 Paris





Two young researchers & an entrepreneur will briefly present their early career path, followed by a Question & Answer session.

 

Sandwiches will be offered by the ASSC.

 

  • Sarah Garfinkel
    PhD (cognitive psychology) : University of Sussex, UK
    Postdoc : University of Michigan, USA
    Research Fellow : Brighton & Sussex Medical School / University of Sussex, UK

 

  • Tristan Bekinschtein
    PhD (neuroscience) : University of Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Postdoc : Inserm-CEA cognitive neuroimaging unit, Paris, France
    Research Fellow : University of Cambridge, UK

 

  • Matthieu Lafon (to be confirmed)
    PhD (cognitive science)  : Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France,
    founder and CEO of Adoc Talent Management (http://www.adoc-tm.com),
    Adoc Staffing Solutions (http://www.adoc-staffing.com)
    and MindMatcher (http://www.mindmatcher.org/)




Local information

 

 

1) TRAVEL TO AND FROM THE AIRPORTS 

Public transport:

Orly Airport (ORY) is located 14 kilometres sout-east of Paris. Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport (CDG) is located 27 kilometers north-east of the capital. A wide range of public transport options are available to travel to and from the airports.

Find the best way to travel between Paris and Orly Airport or Roissy charles de Gaulle Airport here: 

-http://www.ratp.fr/en/ratp/r_61596/access-to-airports/ 

-http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/en/passengers/access

 

Taxis:

Paris-Charles De Gaulle by taxi: http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/en/passengers/access/paris-charles-de-gaulle/taxi/paris-cdg-taxi

Paris-Orly by taxi: http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/en/passengers/access/paris-orly/taxi/taxi

 

Car rental:

Car rental at Paris-Orly and Paris Charles-De-Gaulle: http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/en/passengers/access/car-rental

 

2) PARIS TRANSPORTATION

 

Paris public transportation:

- Tickets: http://www.ratp.fr/en/ratp/r_61584/tickets/

- How to use the Paris Public Transportation:

A simple guide to the rules of the Paris metro and RER: http://www.ratp.fr/en/upload/docs/application/pdf/2014-10/mode_emploi_t.pdf 

- Maps: http://www.ratp.fr/en/ratp/c_20559/consultez-l-ensemble-des-plans/

Metro: http://www.ratp.fr/informer/pdf/orienter/f_plan.php?fm=pdf&loc=reseaux&nompdf=metro

 

Taxis:

- Taxis G7:

Book a taxi: +33 (0) 1 41 27 66 99
Book on line: http://www.taxisg7.com/?tg7=h06cnluu8evrs1vcgv13b8ldb1

- Les Taxis Bleus: 

Reservation: +33 (0) 1 49 36 10 10
https://www.taxis-bleus.com/accueil/index.php

- Alpha Taxis:

Reservation: + 33 (0) 1 45 85 85 85
http://www.alphataxis.fr

- Wecab: Paris Taxi Airport

https://www.wecab.com/en

 

Car rental:

AVIS: http://www.avis.fr/Locationvoiture/Europe/France/Paris

Hertz: https://www.hertz.fr/p/location-de-voiture/france/paris/?hertzid=27673&gclid=CjwKEAiAmaanBRCIt4364e2d6yUSJAA9VXTUCeqvvifVyHN_uGX95M2gDxj0ZV-QablBhacHESPjdhoCINbw_wcB

Sixt: http://car-rental.sixt.com/php/reservation?language=en_GB

Europcar: https://www.europcar.fr/agences/france/paris

 

3) LOCAL INFORMATION 

Paris tourist office: http://en.parisinfo.com

Paris.fr: http://www.paris.fr/english

Mentor lunch

 

Wednesday, July 8th, 12:30am - 2:00pm


Venue : CROUS Mabillon, 3 Rue Mabillon, 75006 Paris. About 10 minutes walk from the ASSC venue





The Mentor Lunch is an opportunity for students to have career advice and discuss particular research questions with their chosen mentor, in groups of up to four students.

A catered lunch will be offered by the ASSC.

 

Mentors :

  • Marisa Carrasco

  • Chris Frith

  • Alison Gopnik

  • Sharon Thompson-Schill

  • Giandomenico Iannetti

  • Hal Blumenfeld

  • Olaf Blanke

  • Tyler Burge

  • Tim Bayne

  • Uriah Kriegel


Registration before May 31st - mariagiovannacorrado@gmail.com

 

How to get there?

Crous Mabillon is about 10 minutes walk from the conference center

mentor lunch walk

ASSC After Party

More information coming soon

ASSC Social

More information coming soon

Welcome reception

 

More information coming soon

 

Sponsored by


At a glance

 

 

Program subject to change

ASSC19 Visa Information

Picto douane VISA INFORMATION

 

All foreign nationals wanting to come to France must be able to submit statutory documentary evidence at the border for the reasons for their stay, their means of support and accommodation arrangements. As a rule, unless you are exempt, you are required to have a visa. It must be applied for from the relevant French embassy or consulate in the applicant’s country of residence.


A certain number of nationalities are exempt from the short-stay visa requirement.


For short stays (less than 90 days), European regulations specify the list of countries whose nationals are exempt from visa requirement to enter the Schengen Area.


Exempt from visa requirement for France’s territory in Europe are :

-  citizens of the EU, the EEA and Switzerland ;
-  nationals of the following countries, whatever the reason for their stay: Albania *, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Bosnia and Herzegovina *, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Malaysia, Mauritius, Monaco, Nicaragua , New Zealand, Panama, Paraguay, Saint Kitts and Nevis, San Marino, Holy See, Seychelles, Taiwan (passport bearing identity card number), Uruguay, Montenegro*, FYROM* and Serbia* ;
*bearers of biometric passports only


For more information regarding Visa Information, please visit the official french gouvernemental website : click here

 

Picto newsLETTER OF INVITATION

 

After identifying that a visa is needed, the Local Organizing Committee can provide you an Invitation letter. To request a Letter of Invitation please send your request to congresassc19@gmail.com and provide the following informations : First Name, Last Name (as indicated on your passport) and full postal address.

ASSC 19 Venue

 

 

LOCATION

The conference will take place at the Centre Universitaire des Saints-Pères, 45 rue des Saints-Pères, right in the center of Paris, in Saint-Germain des Près.

The Centre Universitaire des Saints-Pères was built in a massive "art déco" style and was inaugurated in 1953 by President Vincent Auriol. The exterior walls of the university are decorated with 45 medallions, 120 cm in diameter, representing subjects from Antiquity to the Middle Ages. The main gate in bronze was the work of Paul Landowski and represents scenes of men and women in Nature and Scenes drom Mythology.

 

METRO STATIONS

Saint-Germain des Près (Line 4)

Mabillon (Line 10)

Rue du Bac (Line 12)

Saint-Michel (RER B) - Require 15 minutes walk

 

FROM AIRPORTS TO PARIS

From Roissy Charles de Gaulle take RER B to Saint-Michel either walk 15 minutes or take line number 4, nearest station, to St-Germain des Près.

Orly Sud or Ouest - Take Orly Bus (Bus RATP) to Denfert-Rochereau, then the metro. You can also use the Orlyval to Antony and then take the RER B to Denfert-Rochereau.

 

MAPS

Maps of the metro:

- http://www.ratp.fr/informer/pdf/orienter/f_plan.php?fm=pdf&loc=reseaux&nompdf=metro

- maps of the metro with streets: http://www.ratp.fr/informer/pdf/orienter/f_plan.php?nompdf=metro_geo&loc=secteur&fm=pdf

Paris public transportation website: http://www.ratp.fr/en/ratp/c_21879/visiting-paris/

Sensorimotor Satellite

 

ASSC Satellite Workshop: ‘The Sensorimotor Theory of Perception and Consciousness: Developments and Open Questions’

Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th July 2015 – Paris, France

Keynote speakers – Anthony Chemero, Alva Noë
Invited speakers – Malika Auvray, Xabier Barandiaran, Andreas Engel, Erik Myin

The sensorimotor theory claims that we can make strides toward dissolving the mysteries of consciousness if we think of experience as a kind of bodily engagement with the environment rather than something that happens only in the brain. Specifically, it claims that perceptual consciousness depends on implicit mastery of sensorimotor contingencies, the pattern-like ways that sense inputs change in line with movement by the agent or object perceived.

Since its first official statement in a seminal paper by O’Regan and Noë (2001), the theory has been extended and developed in various ways, resulting in a rich set of empirical and philosophical ideas about conscious experience. This workshop will give an overview of the state of the art and discuss key issues that a future sensorimotor theory should tackle.

Registration:

Everybody is welcome. Participation is free but places are strictly limited. To register, please email Niclette Bukasa Kampata on lpp.erc.vision@gmail.com with your name and any affiliation.

Workshop programme:

The two-day workshop will feature a combination of philosophers and scientists working on the sensorimotor theory and closely related topics.

Keynote speakers:

  • Alva Noë (Berkeley) -‘Sensorimotor understanding and the limits of agency’
  • Anthony Chemero (Cincinnati) – ‘Feeling into the situation’



     Invited speakers:

  • Malika Auvray (Institute of Intelligent Systems and Robotics) – ‘Questioning the use of sensory substitution devices at the behavioral, phenomenal and neurophysiological levels’
  • Xabier Barandiaran (Basque Country) – ‘Strong and weak sensorimotor constitution of experience’
  • Andreas Engel (University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf) - Title TBA
  • Erik Myin (Antwerp) – ‘Reasons for radicalism’

 

Venue:

Centre Universitaire des Saints Pères,
45 Rue des Saints Pères,
75006 Paris,
France

The workshop is being organised by Kevin O’Regan, Lucia Foglia, David Silverman and Jan Degenaar as part of Kevin O’Regan’s ERC Advanced Project FEEL, based at the Psychology of Perception Laboratory, Paris Descartes University.

For questions, please contact Niclette Bukasa Kampata at lpp.erc.vision@gmail.com

For up to date information and a full list of speakers, visit http://lpp.psycho.univ-paris5.fr/feel/?page_id=691

 

 

ASSC 18 - Program

                                    ------ ASSC 18 Final Program ------

 

To download a PDF of the draft program including ABSTRACTS [Click Here]

 

 

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: The Hard Problem of Consciousness: 300 Years on.

David Chalmers

Australian National University and New York University


KEYNOTE 1: Binocular Rivalry and Visual Awareness

Sheng He

University of Minnesota, USA and Chinese Academy of Sciences 

 

KEYNOTE 2: Are Consciousness and Attention Dissociable? 

Jesse Prinz  

City University of New York, USA 

 

KEYNOTE 3: The Neurophysiology of the Unconscious Brain under General Anesthesia. 

Emery Brown

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA 

 

KEYNOTE 4: Spatial awareness and its disorders

Melanie Wilke

University Medical Centre Goettingen, Germany 

 

SPECIAL TALK 1: Through a Glass Darkly: Inferring the Palaeolithic Mind

Jack Pettigrew

University of Queensland, Australia

 

SPECIAL TALK 2: Understanding Consciousness: from the lab to the clinic.

Stanislas Dahaene

INSERM-CEA Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, Collège de France

-------------------------------------------------

 

SYMPOSIUM 1: Consciousness Across The Species: The adaptive Value of Pain

AEB Auditorum - Thursday 16:00

Chair: Adam Shriver 

Talk 1. Victoria Braithwaite (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
"Do fish feel pain"

Talk 2. Dan Weary (The University of British Columbia, Canada)
“Experimental design and strength of inferences regarding affect during loss of consciousness”

Talk 3. David Edelman (Bennington College, USA)
“Identifying nociception and the experience of pain in the octopus”

Talk 4. Paula Droege (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
“In defense of function 

 

 

SYMPOSIUM 2: Quantifying Consciousness: Theoretical and clinical implications   

AEB Auditorum - Friday 10:30

Chair: Jacobo Sitt and Aaron Schurger 

Talk 1. Aaron Schurger (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
"Stability as a signature of neuronal adequacy for subjective report"

Talk 2. Marcello Massimini (The University of Milan, Italy)
“Towards an objective index of the level of consciousness”

Talk 3. Jacobo Sitt (L'Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, France)
“Insights and applications from contrasting conscious states”

Talk 4. Anil Seth (University of Sussex, UK)
“Quantitative measures of conscious level: prospects and perils”

 

 

SYMPOSIUM 3: Unconscious perception: Does it exist, and what should we require from evidence? 

AEB Auditorum - Saturday 10:30

Chair: David Carmel and Axel Cleeremans 

Talk 1. David Carmel (University of Edinburgh, UK)
"Unconscious perception is not a single thing"

Talk 2. Joel Pearson (The University of New South Wales, Australia)
“Using unconscious information for sensory and bistable decisions”

Talk 3. Zoltan Dienes (University of Sussex, UK)
“Improving on the null hypothesis: Bayesian objective and subjective thresholds”

Talk 4. Axel Cleeremans (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium)
“The mind’s sea serpent”

 

 

SYMPOSIUM 4: Consciousness in sleep: what it is like, what can it tell us, and how it can be measured

AEB Auditorum - Saturday 15:30

Chair: Chiara Cirelli

Talk 1. Chiara Cirelli (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
"Neurophysiology of sleep"

Talk 2. Francesca Siclari (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
“Assessing sleep consciousness within subjects using a serial awakening paradigm and high-density EEG 

Talk 3. Michael Czisch (Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Germany)
“Sleep, dreams and consciousness: A neuroimaging perspective”

Talk 4. Thomas Metzinger/Jennifer Windt (Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany; Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany)
“Dreaming, consciousness and the self: Spatiotemporal self- location and minimal phenomenal selfhood”

 

 

---------  Concurrent Session 1 - Morning Thursday 17th 10:30  ----------

Stream A: Neural Signatures and Models of Consciousness

VENUE: Steele, rm 206

Patterns of event-related potentials reflect fast unconscious semantic analyses of how images relate to subjective connotations of time 

Stefan Bode [1], Daniel Bennett [1,2], Jutta Stahl [3], Carsten Murawski [2]

[1] Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia, [2] Department of Finance, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia, [3] Department of Psychology, University of Cologne, 50969 Cologne, Germany


 

Spectral phase and power predict stimulus category, but only power predicts visual awareness in intracranial EEG in humans 

Jochem van Kempen [1,2], Hiroto Kawasaki [3], Christopher K. Kovach [3], Hiroyuki Oya [3], Matthew A. Howard [3], Ralph Adolphs [4], Naotsugu Tsuchiya [2]

[1] University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, [2] Monash University, Australia, [3] University of Iowa, IA, USA, [4] California Institute of Technology, CA, USA.

 

Resource allocation during the attentional blink: an MEG study using machine learning 

Sebastien Marti [1,2], King JR [1,2], Dehaene S [1,2,3].

[1] INSERM, U992, Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France, [2] CEA, DSV/I2BM, NeuroSpin Center, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France, [3] Collège de France, F-75005 Paris, France

 

Conscious, but not unconscious, across-trial conflict resolution is associated with theta-band oscillatory neural modulations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex  

Simon van Gaal [1,2] Jun Jiang [1,3] Qinglin Zhang [3]

[1] University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands [2] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Nijmegen, the Netherlands [3] Key laboratory of cognition and personality (Ministry of Education), and Faculty of psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China

 

Spectral signatures of brain networks in disorders of consciousness 

Srivas Chennu [1,2], Paola Finoia [1,2], Evelyn Kamau [1], Judith Allanson [3], Guy B. Williams [4], Martin M. Monti [5], David K. Menon [6], John D. Pickard [1], Adrian M. Owen [7], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [2]

[1] Division of Neurosurgery, University of Cambridge, Box 167, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK [2] Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK [3] Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Box 120, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK [4] Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Box 65, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK [5] Department of Psychology, University of California at Los Angeles, 1285 Franz Hall, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, USA [6] Division of Anaesthesia, University of Cambridge, Box 93, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK [7] The Brain and Mind Institute, Room 225, Natural Sciences Centre, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada

 

“Aboutness” revisited: The implications for, and applicability of, relativizing the content-specificity of qualia in neuroscience 

Yasuko Kitano [1]

[1] Department of History and Philosophy of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo Japan

 

Stream B: Perception and Attention

VENUE: Steele, rm 309

The influence of stimulus visibility in priming depends on the type of masking 

Uwe Mattler [1] Martina Wernicke [1]

Georg August Universität Göttingen Georg Elias Müller Institute for Psychology Department Experimental Psychology Gossler Strasse 14 37073 Göttingen

 

A model of acquired perceptual warping 

Guy Wallis [1]

[1] Centre for Sensorimotor Performance School of Human Movement Studies University of Queensland QLD 4072 Australia

 

Shape perception simultaneously up- and down-regulates neural activity in the primary visual cortex 

Peter Kok [1], Floris P. de Lange [1]

[1] Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Netherlands

 

Neural correlates of subjective awareness for natural scene categorization of color photographs and line-drawings 

Qiufang Fu [1], Yongjin Liu [2], Zoltan Dienes [3], Jianhui Wu [1], Wenfeng Chen [1], Xiaolan Fu [1]

[1] State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China [2] Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, China [3] Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science and School of Psychology, University of Sussex, BN1 9QH, Brighton, United Kingdom

 

Predicting visual consciousness from brain activity: Roles for noise and adaptation

Robert P. O’Shea [1,2], Urte Roeber [1,2,3], Ming Alexander Heathershaw Jones [1], Emma-Lee Durrant [1], Michael L. Hawes [1]

[1] Discipline of Psychology, School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, Australia, [2] BioCog, Institute for Psychology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany, [3] Discipline of Biomedical Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

 

Attention and consciousness may operate though different gain functions 

Jeroen J.A. van Boxtel [1]

[1] School of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash

 

Stream C: Body, Self and Agency

VENUE: Steele, rm 329

Self-Touching Illusion and Bodily Self-Consciousness 

Caleb Liang [1,2], Si-Yan Chang [1], Wen-Yeo Chen [2], Hsu-Chia Huang [3], Yen-Tung Lee [4]

[1] Department of Philosophy, National Taiwan University, Taiwan [2] Graduate Institute of Brain and Mind Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan [3] Institute of Fisheries Science, National Taiwan University, Taiwan [4] Department of Psychology, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

 

Process, Consciousness, and Self 

Karen Yan [1]

[1] Institute of Philosophy of Mind and Cognition, National Yang-Ming University

 

Audience Effect as Evidence for Mirror Self-Recognition in Chickens 

Alexis Garland [1], Inga Tiemann [2], Mareike Fellmin [2], Onur Güntürkün [1]

[1] Ruhr University Bochum, [2] Bruno-Dürigen Institute

 

Altered experiences of control in expertise, schizophrenia and hypnosis: Measuring and understanding changes to the sense of agency 

Vince Polito [1]

[1] Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

 

Experimentally induced changes in Bodily Self Consciousness affect semantic processing 

Elisa Canzoneri [1], Giuseppe di Pellegrino [2,3], Olaf Blanke [1], Andrea Serino [1]

[1] Center for Neuroprosthetics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, [2] Centre for Studies and Research in Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Bologna,Cesena, Italy, [3] Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

 

Intentional Binding with a Robotic Hand - To what extent is agency modulated by embodiment? 

Emilie Caspar [1], Patrick Haggard [2], & Axel Cleeremans [1]

[1] Consciousness, Cognition and Computation Group (CO3), Centre de Recherche Neurosciences & Cognition (CRCN), ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience & Dept. Psychology, University College London (UCL)

 

 

---------- Concurrent Session 2 – Afternoon Thursday 17th 13:30 --------------

 

Stream A: Anaesthesia, Sleep and Seizures 

VENUE: Steele, rm 206

Brain networks dynamics before sedation predict subsequent loss of consciousness  

Srivas Chennu [1,4], Stuart O’ Connor[2], Ram Adapa[3], David Menon[3] and Tristan Bekinschtein [4]

[1] Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom [2] Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, United Kindgom [3] Division of Anaesthesia, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom [4] MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom

 

Breakdowns in parietal network functional connectivity reflect agent-invariant network changes underlying anaesthetic-induced reductions in consciousness 

Levin Kuhlmann [1], Will Woods [1], John Cormack [2], Sarah Kondogiannis [2], Jamie Sleigh [3], David T.J. Liley [1]

[1] Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, [2] Department of Anaesthesiology, St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, [3] Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Auckland

 

Disruption of hierarchical auditory predictive coding during sleep 

Melanie [1,2], Jacobo Sitt [1,2,3], Jean-Remi King [1,2,3], Maxime Elbaz [4], Leila Azizi-Rogeau [1,2], Marco Buiatti [1,2], Virginie Van Wassenhove [1,2], Stanislas Dehaene [1,2,5,6].

[1] Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U992, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France , [2] NeuroSpin Center, Institute of BioImaging, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France, [3] Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière Research Center, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U975 Paris, France, [4] Centre du sommeil et de la vigilance, Hôpital de l’Hôtel Dieu, F-75004 Paris, France, [5] Université Paris 11, Orsay, France, [6] Collège de France, F-75005 Paris, France.

 

Consciousness during Sleep: what happens to it? Its relevance to Insomnia?

Leon C. Lack [1,2], Jeremy Mercer [2]

[1] School of Psychology, Flinders University, South Australia, [2] Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Daw Park, South Australia

 

Inducing task-relevant responses in the sleeping brain 

Sid Kouider [1], Thomas Andrillon [1], Louise Goupil [1, 2], Leonardo S. Barbosa [1], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [2], [1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, CNRS/EHESS/DEC-.-ENS, Paris, France, [2] Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, UK.

[1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, CNRS/EHESS/DEC-.-ENS, Paris, France [2] Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, UK.

 

Mechanism of impaired consciousness in childhood absence seizures 

Hal Blumenfeld [1,2,3], Jennifer Guo [1], Robert Kim [1], Stephen Jhun[1], Wendy Xiao[1], Erin Feeney[1], Xiaoxiao Bai[1], Michiro Negishi[4], Hetal Mistry[1], Michael Crowley[5], Linda Mayes[5], and R. Todd Constable[4]

[1] Dept of Neurology, Yale University., New Haven, CT [2] Dept of Neurobiology, Yale University., New Haven, CT [3] Dept of Neurosurgery, Yale University., New Haven, CT [4] Dept of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University., New Haven, CT [5] Child Study Center, Yale University., New Haven, CT

 


Stream B: Predictive Processes 

VENUE: Steele, rm 309

Expect surprises 

Anya Farennikova [1]

[1] Centre for Consciousness, Australian National University

 

Consciousness in the Predictive Mind 

Jakob Hohwy [1]

[1] Department of Philosophy, Monash University

 

Hierarchical Temporal Intentionality 

John Thornton [1]

[1] Institute of Integrated and Intelligent Systems and School of Humanities, Griffith University

 

Predictive Perception of Sensorimotor Contingencies: Explaining perceptual presence and its absence in synaesthesia 

Anil Seth [1]

Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science School of Engineering and Informatics University of Sussex Brighton BN1 9QJ UK

 

Task demands modulate the effects of perceptual expectations in early visual cortex 

Elexa St. John-Saaltink [1], Christian Utzerath [1], Peter Kok [1], Hakwan Lau [1,2], Floris P. de Lange[1]

[1] Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, [2] Columbia University, Department of Psychology, New York, New York, USA

 

Mechanisms of deviance detection are affected by visual consciousness 

Bradley N. Jack [1], Urte Roeber [1,2,3], and Robert P. O’Shea [1,2]

[1] Discipline of Psychology, School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, Australia [2] Institute for Psychology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany [3] Discipline of Biomedical Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia


Stream C: Time Perception and Temporal Processing 

 

VENUE: Steele, rm 329

Hierarchical processing in the infant brain: a late response might signal conscious access in three-month-old infants 

Ghislaine Dehaene-Lambertz [1], A. Basirat [1] and S. Dehaene [1]

[1] INSERM, U992, Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France

 

 

On the modulation of interoception: Insights from the use of food deprivation in healthy females and cognitive-behavioral therapy in anorexia nervosa. 

Olga Pollatos [1] Sarah Weiss [1]

[1] Health Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Ulm, Germany

 

Experimental Evidence That Illusory Percepts Are The Basis Of The Flow Of Time 

Ronald Gruber [1], Michael Bach [2], Richard Block [3]

[1] Stanford University Medical Center, [2] University of Freiburg, [3] Montana State University

 

New evidence for the differences in time perception during foveal and parafoveal vision 

Eve A. Isham [1], Kevin Le [1], Aimee Lynch [1], Steven J. Luck [1], William Prinzmetal [2], Joy J. Geng [1]

[1] University of California, Davis [2] University of California, Berkeley

 

Altered Time Perception in Patients with Bipolar Disorder  

Francesco Giorlando [1,2], Shikha Markanday [2], Andrew J. Anderson [3], Roger H. S. Carpenter [4], Michael Berk [1,2,5,6,7]

[1] Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, [2] Barwon Health and the Geelong Clinic, Swanston Centre, Geelong, Victoria, Australia, [3] Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, [4] Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, Cambridge University, Cambridge UK, [5] IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia, [6] Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, Centre for Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, [7] The Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

 

Modulating temporal recalibration with degraded visual awareness 

Regan M. Gallagher[1], Kielan Yarrow[2], Derek H. Arnold[1]

[1] University of Queensland, [2] City College London,

 

 

---------  Concurrent Session 3 – Afternoon Saturday 19th 13:15  --------------

Stream A: Action and Behaviour 

VENUE: Steele, rm 206

(Almost) twenty years of pictorial illusions, perception, and action 

Melvyn Alan Goodale [1]

[1] The Brain and Mind Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada

 

The evolutionary function of conscious information processing is revealed by its task-dependency in olfaction 

Andreas Keller [1]

[1] Philosophy Program, Graduate Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016-4309, USA

 

Seeing through action: Implicit action cost constrains the perceptual decision making 

Nobuhiro Hagura [1], Patrick Haggard[1], Jörn Diedrichsen[1]

[1] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3AR, United Kingdom

 

Does a fly know when it is in control? 

Leonie Kirszenblat[1], Angelique Paulk[1], Yanqiong Zhou[1] and Bruno van Swinderen[1]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia

 

Egocentric representation and the two-visual systems hypothesis 

Robert Foley [1]

[1] The Rotman Institute and The Brain and Mind Institute, Department of Philosophy, Western University.

 

The Impact of Prior Expectations on Subliminal Behavioral and Electrophysiological Responses 

Leonardo S. Barbosa [1], Romain Grandchamp [1], Sid Kouider [1]

[1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, EHESS/CNRS/ENS-DEC, 75005 Paris, France.

 

 

Stream B: Metacognition and Clinical Studies of Awareness 

VENUE: Steele, rm 309

Trust your feelings, Luke! Metacognitive awareness guides the selection of low-conflict contexts in the absence of prime awareness 

Kobe Desender [1], Filip Van Opstal [2], Eva Van den Bussche [1]

[1] Free University Brussels, Belgium, [2] Ghent University, Belgium

 

The influence of visual identification on perceptual awareness ratings 

Michal Wierzchon [1], Marta Siedlecka [1], Boryslaw Paulewicz [2]

[1] Consciousness Lab, Institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, [2] Warsaw School of Social Science and Humanities, Faculty in Katowice, Poland

 

Oscillatory mechanisms related to (pre-)reflective decision-making 

Martijn E. Wokke [1,2], K. Richard Ridderinkhof [1,2]

[1] Amsterdam Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands [2] Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

 

Selective impairment in perceptual metacognition following anterior prefrontal lesions 

Stephen M. Fleming [1,2], Jihye Ryu [1,3], John G. Golfinos [4], Karen E. Blackmon [5]

[1] Center for Neural Science, New York University, [2] Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, [3] Department of Psychology, City University of New York, [4] Department of Neurosurgery, New York University School of Medicine, [5] Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine

 

EEG responses to stimuli of personal relevance in healthy controls and disorder of consciousness patients

Manuel Schabus [1,2], Renata del Giudice [1], Julia Lechinger [1], Malgorzata Wislowska [1], Dominik P.J. Heib [1], Kerstin Hoedlmoser [1,2] 

[1] University of Salzburg, Department of Psychology, Laboratory for Sleep, Cognition and Consciousness Research, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, Salzburg (AUSTRIA), [2] Center for Cognitive Neuroscience Salzburg (CCNS) (AUSTRIA)

 

The use of pupil dilation to communicate with locked-in syndrome patients 

Olivia Carter [1], Josef Stoll [2], Camille Chatelle [3], Christof Koch [4], Steven Laureys [3] and Wolfgang Einhauser [2, 5]

[1] Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia
, [2] Neurophysics, Philips-University, Germany
, [3] Coma Science Group, University and University Hospital of Liege, Belgium [4] Allen Institute for Brain Science, USA
 [5] Center for Interdisciplinary Research (ZiF), Bielefeld University, Germany

 

Stream C: Subliminal Processing 

VENUE: Steele, rm 262

Cross cultural difference in unconscious process in implicit learning 

Lulu Wan [1], Zoltan Dienes [2]

[1] Research School of Psychology, Australian National University, Australia, [2] University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

 

Unconscious Salience Accelerates Conscious Access 

Ryan B. Scott [1,3], Anil K. Seth [2,3]

[1] School of Psychology, University of Sussex, [2] Department of Informatics, University of Sussex, [3] Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex

 

A window of subliminal perception 

Kristian Sandberg [1,2] Bo Martin Bibby [3] Simon Hviid Del Pin [1,4] Morten Overgaard [1,4]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Aarhus University [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London [3] Department of Biostatistics, Aarhus University [4] CNRU, Dept. of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg University

 

Measuring Intuition: Unconscious Emotional Information Boosts Decision-Making Accuracy and Confidence 

Galang Lufityanto [1], Christopher Donkin [1], and Joel Pearson [1]

[1] School of Psychology, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2030, Australia

 

Don't make me angry: Manipulating volitional choices to act or inhibit by subliminal emotional faces 

Jim Parkinson [1,4], Sarah N Garfinkel [3,4], Zoltan Dienes [1,4], Anil K Seth [2,4]

[1] School of Psychology University of Sussex, [2] Department of Informatics University of Sussex, [3] Brighton and Sussex Medical School, [4] Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science University of Sussex

 

Attending to the Unseen: The Effects of Spatial Attention on Neural Responses to Visible and Invisible Stimuli 

Cooper Smout [1,2], Jason Mattingley [1,2]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, [2] The University of Queensland

 


-------------------  Poster Session - Friday 18th of July  (final program) ---------------------

 

Philosophy Assorted 

1. Limitations to theories of the mind imposed by bandwidth and irreversibility 

Richard Davies Gill

 

2. "Neurocomplementarity" - A possible basis for our dualistic intuitions? 

Johan Frederik Storm [1]

[1] Department of Physiology, IMB, University of Oslo

 

3. What is the contribution of conscious reflection to reliabilist justification?

Susannah Kate Devitt [1]

[1] Queensland University of Technology

 

4. The Great Mind Shift: Three Scenarios 

Marcus T Anthony [1,2]

[1] Swinburne University of Technology, [2] MindFutures

 

5. On the evolution of conscious attention 

Harry Haroutioun Haladjian [1], Carlos Montemayor [2]

[1] School of Social Sciences and Psychology, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia, [2] Department of Philosophy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

6. The Mood-Emotion Loop 

Muk-Yan Wong [1]

[1] Hang Seng Management College

 

7. Phenomenal Properties as Nonconceptual Representations: A Defense from Autism 

Chieh-Ling (Katherine) Cheng [1], Karen Yan [1]

[1] Institute of Philosophy of Mind and Cognition, National Yang Ming University, Taiwan

 

8. The Non-trivial Subject Unity 

Ting-An Lin [1], Allen Y. Houng [1]

[1] National Yang-Ming University

 

Philosophical and Neuroscientific Theories of Consciousness 

9. The Extended Machinery of Consciousness 

Maria Giovanna Corrado [1]

[1] Cardiff University

 

10. The Negative Neural Correlate of Consciousness 

Marian Schneider [1, 2], Ingo Marquardt [1,3]

[1] Maastricht University, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience [2] University College London, Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging [3] University of Oxford, Oxford University's Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain

 

11. A Unified Model of Conscious and Unconscious processes 

Kaelasha Tyler [1], David Liley [1]

[1] Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122, Australia

 

12. Natural dualism gives a molecular solution to the mind-body problem for psychiatry

Niall McLaren [1]

[1] Northern Psychiatric Services Brisbane, Australia.

 

13. Inferential processing abnormalities in depression, and the antidepressant mechanisms of non-ordinary states

Paul Liknaitzky [1]

[1] School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne

 

14. Strange choice - approximate answer in dissociative disorder evaluated by a forced-choice test. 

Akihiro Koreki [1], Takaki Maeda [1], Keisuke Takahata [2], Tsukasa Okimura [1], Sho Moriguchi [1], Taro Muramatsu [1], Masaru Mimura [1], Motoichiro Kato [1]

[1]Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. [2]Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan.

 

 

15. Mental causation in the course of neurorehabilitation: an argument for subjective agency? 

Patrick Grüneberg [1]

[1] Artificial Intelligence Laboratory/Center for Cybernics Research, University of Tsukuba, Japan

 

16. Standing Wave Theory of Consciousness: A self-organizing neural reaction-diffusion model of (un)conscious neural dynamics 

Selen Atasoy[1], Isaac Donnelly[1,2], Joel Pearson[1]

[1] School of Psychology, University of New South Wales [2] School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New South Wales

 

17. The neuro-integrative account of consciousness

Lukasz Kurowski [1]

[1] York University

 

Coma, Anaesthesia, Sleep and Seizures 

18. What is ‘unconsciousness’ in a fly or worm? Unpacking general anaesthesia endpoints in model organisms

Oressia Zalucki [1], Bruno van Swinderen [1]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia

 

19. Neural signatures of sleep in the fly brain

Melvyn Yap [1], Bart van Alphen [1,2], Paul Shaw [3], Bruno van Swinderen [1]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, [2] Department of Neurobiology and Physiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA, [3] Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA

 

20. Induced gamma-band activity signals awareness of change in a bistable percept during wakefulness but changes dynamics with sleep onset. 

Andrés Canales-Johnson [1,2], Daniela Cabezas [2], Carolina Silva [2], Francisco Olivares [2], Roberto García [2], Arturo Pérez [2], Álvaro A. Rivera-Rei [2], Valdas Noreika [1], Robert P. Carlyon [1], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [1]

[1] MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom. [2] Laboratory of Cognitive and Social Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago, Chile

 

21. Electroencephalogram approximate entropy influenced by both age and sleep 

Gerick Lee [1, 2], Sara Fattinger [2], Anne-Laure Mouthon [2], Quentin Noirhomme [3], Reto Huber [1]

[1] Institute of Neuroinformatics, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, [2] University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich Switzerland, [3] Coma Science Group, Neurology Department, Cyclotron Research Centre, University Hospital of Liège, University of Liège, Liège Belgium

 

22. Sleepy? Doing it worst without noticing: decrease in performance but not confidence in decision-making while falling asleep 

Stanimira Georgieva [1,2], Tristan Bekinschtein [1].

[1] MRC - Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK [2] Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

23. Left-handedness protects healthy participants from neglect-like effects induced at sleep onset. 

Corinne A. Bareham [1], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [1], Sophie K. Scott [2] and Tom Manly [1]

[1] MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF, United Kingdom, [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, London, United Kingdom

 

24. Neurophysiological markers of sensory-motor expectations in human sleep 

Thomas Andrillon [1,2], Sid Kouider [3]

[1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, UMR8554, Département d'Etudes Cognitives, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France, [2] Ecole Doctorale Cerveau Cognition Comportement, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France

 

25. Meditation as a countermeasure for attention deficits and sleepiness following acute sleep restriction

Mark Kohler [1], Maarten Immink M [2], Mallory Rawlings [1], April Kaeding [1].

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; [2] School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

 

26. Mismatch Negativity in Disorders of Consciousness 

Bochra Zareini [1], Martin J. Dietz [4], Mads Jensen [1], Michael Nygaard Petersen [1], Jørgen Feldbæk [2], Carsten Koch-Jensen [3], Morten Overgaard [1]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital [2] Hammel Neurocenter [3] Neurosurgical Department Aarhus University Hospital [4] Center for Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital

 

27. Using semantic eyeblink conditioning as an index of conscious function and abstract rule processing in patients with disorders of consciousness 

Moos Peeters [1] , Karalyn Patterson [1,2], Mariano Sigman [3], Adrian M. Owen [4], Srivas Chennu [2], Paola Finoia [5], Evelyn Kamau [2], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [1]

[1] MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK [2] University of Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Herchel Smith Building for Brain and Mind Sciences, Robinson Way, Cambridge [3] Laboratory of Integrative Neuroscience, Physics Department, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. [4] Brain and Mind Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7, Canada. [5] Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosciences, University of Cambridge

 

Neural Signatures of Consciousness 

28. Balancing integration and segregation in brain dynamics. 

Peter Stratton [1,2], Janet Wiles [3]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia, [2] The University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Queensland, Australia, [3] School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia.

 

29. Direct electrical stimulation of the human default-network core produces no subjective change in consciousness 

Brett L. Foster [1,2], Josef Parvizi [1,2]

[1] Stanford Human Intracranial Cognitive Electrophysiology Program, [2] Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University

 

30. Could the worms have it? 

Timothy Durbridge [1]

[1] Greenhill Research

 

31. A dissociation of conceptualization processes from consciousness processes 

Lau Møller Andersen [1] Morten Overgaard [1,2]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, [2] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Hammel Neurorehabilitation and Research Center, MindLab, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus

 

32. Predicting detection performance based on pre-stimulus EEG responses 

Mana Fujiwara [1,3], Riccarda Peters [1,3], Roger Koenig [1], Naotsugu Tsuchiya [1,2]

[1] School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, [2] Decoding and Controlling Brain Information, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan, [3] Equal contribution

 

33. Initial EEG phase predicts the timing of perceptual switches in continuous flash suppression.

Bryan Paton [1,2,3], Jakob Hohwy [2], Gary Egan [1,3], Naotsugu Tsuchiya [1]

[1] School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, [2] Monash Philosophy & Cognition Lab, Monash University, [3] Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University.

 

34. Informational Structure of Perceptual Experiences

Andrew M. Haun[1], Fabiano Baroni[1], Jochem van Kempen[1], Hiroto Kawasaki[2], Christopher K. Kovach[2], Hiroyuki Oya[2], Matthew A. Howard[2], Ralph Adolphs[3], Naotsugu Tsuchiya[1,4]

[1] Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, [2] University of Iowa, USA, [3] California Institute of Technology, USA, [4] Japan Science and Technology, Japan

 

35. Activity in the auditory cortex and the subject’s awareness

Junpei Nishi [1], Ken Mogi [2], Yoshi Tamori [3]

[1] Graduate Program in Bioscience and Applied Chemistry, KIT, [2] Sony CSL, [3] HISL, KIT

 

36. Stimulus-evoked neural activity and intrinsic variations in visual awareness: An EEG/fMRI study

Joshua J. LaRocque [1], Jason Samaha [2], Olivia Gosseries [3], Giulio Tononi [3] and Bradley R. Postle [2,3]

[1] University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical Scientist Training Program and Neuroscience Training Program, [2] University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Psychology, [3] University of Wisconsin Department of Psychiatry

 

37. Intracranial Markers of Conscious Face Perception in Humans

Fabiano Baroni [1,2], Jochem van Kempen [1,3], Hiroto Kawasaki [4], Christopher K. Kovach [4], Hiroyuki Oya [4], Matthew A. Howard [4], Ralph Adolphs [5], Naotsugu Tsuchiya [1]

[1] Monash University, Australia, [2] University of Melbourne, Australia, [3] University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, [4] University of Iowa, IA, USA, [5] California Institute of Technology, CA, USA.

 

Attention and Perception 

38. Unconscious Gestalt completion affects what we are aware of during Motion Induced Blindness 

Cameron T Ellis [1], Anthony J Lambert [1], Paul M Corballis [1]

[1] Centre for Brain Research, University of Auckland, New Zealand

 

39. Cues triggering recovery from mind wandering 

Taisuke Morita [1], Masato Kawasaki [2]

[1] Tokyo University of Science, [2] Teikyo University of Science

 

40. Some distraction increases conscious awareness 

Kristen Pammer [1] Rosy Allen [1], Hannah Korrel [1,2], Vanessa Beanland [1]

[1] The Australian National University [2] Melbourne University

 

41. Examination of vague experiences during Kanizsa based illusions 

Simon Hviid Del Pin [1], Kristian Sandberg [1,2], Morten Overgaard [1,3]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Aarhus University [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London [3] Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dept. of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg University

 

42. Graphemes sharing phonetic properties tend to induce similar synesthetic colors.  

Mi-Jeong Kang [1], Ye-Seul Kim [1], Ji-young Shin [2], Chai-Youn Kim [1]

[1] Department of Psychology, Korea University, [2] Department of Korean Language and Literature, Korea University

 

43. Localizing category-selective BOLD signals in fMRI using SWIFT  

Koenig-Robert R [1], VanRullen R [2,3] and Tsuchiya N [1]

[1] School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, [2] Centre de recherche cerveau et cognition (CerCo), UMR5549, CNRS, [3] Université Paul Sabatier, CHU Purpan, Toulouse, France

 

44. SSVEP is modulated by dynamical change of object recognition state

Kazuki Azuma [1], Tetsuto Minami [2], Shigeki Nakauchi [1]

[1] Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, [2] Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute, Toyohashi University of Technology

 

45. The Effect of Temporal Attention on Neural Oscillations, Discrimination Accuracy, and Subjective Visibility

Jason Samaha [1], Sawyer Cimaroli [1], Bradley R. Postle [1,2]

[1] University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Psychology, [2] University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Psychiatry

 

46. A Multi-factor Experimental Study on the Attention-orienting Triggered by Visual Subliminal Spatial Cue 

Liao Dongsheng [1], Zhang Jingxuan [1], Han Limin [1], Yang Fang [1], Xiong Xinglin [1]

[1] College of Social Sciences and Humanities, National University of Defense Technology

 

47. Extraction of the covert divided attention by steady-state visual evoked potential

Takahiro Shinkai [1], Tetsuto Minami [1], Shigeki Nakauchi [1]

[1] Toyohashi University of technology

 

48. By How Long does Visual Perception Lag the Physical World? 

Mark Chappell [1]

[1] Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Brain and Behavioural Health Centre, Griffith Institute of Health, and School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Australia.

 

49. The Role of Monocular Dominance in Rivalry Onset Bias 

Jody Stanley [1], Jason Forte [1], Alexander Maier [2], Olivia Carter [1]

[1] Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia, [2] Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN USA

 

50. The suppressive effects of phantom colour on conscious perception

Shuai Chang [1], Joel Pearson [1]

[1] School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

 

51. Visual field asymmetries in conscious identification  

Irina M. Harris [1], Cara Wong [1]

[1] School of Psychology, University of Sydney. 

 

52. Do you see what I see? Personality and perceptual suppression 

Anna Antinori [1], Olivia Carter [1], Luke Smillie [1].

[1] Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne.

 

53. The self through time: A neuroscientific investigation using twins 

David Butler [1], Jason Mattingley [1,2], Ross Cunnington [1,2], Thomas Suddendorf [1]

[1] School of Psychology, University of Queensland, [2] Queensland Brain Institute

 

54. Intertwined coding of facial affects and odor hedonics 

Wei Chen [1], Kepu Chen [1], Wen Zhou [1]

[1] Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

55. A functional MRI study on thought suppression

Takashi Kiyonaka [1], Toshihiko Aso [1], Takaaki Aoki [2], Michiyo Inagawa [2], Hidenao Fukuyama [1], Kazuo Nishimura [2]

[1] Human Brain Research Center, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, [2] Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University 

 

Memory 

56. Attentional blink-like effect in working memory 

Zbigniew Stettner [1], Jarosław Orzechowski [1], Krzysztof T. Piotrowski [1]

[1] Institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland

 

57. The awareness of information in working memory: Time delay and confidence assesment.  

Krzysztof T. Piotrowski [1], Zbigniew Stettner [1], Jaroslaw Orzechowski [1]

[1] Jagielonian University, Institute of Psychology

 

58. Availability and consciousness of working memory content in serial recognition.

Jarosław Orzechowski [1], Krzysztof Piotrowski [1], Zbigniew Stettner [1]

[1] Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland

 

59. Modeling access to working memory as a self-evaluation and decision process 

Catherine Wacongne [1, 2, 3, 4], Jean-Pierre Changeux [5], Stanislas Dehaene [1, 2, 3, 4]

[1] INSERM, U992, Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France, [2] CEA, DSV/I2BM, NeuroSpin Center, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France , [3] University Paris 11, Orsay, France, [4 Collège de France, F-75005 Paris, France , [5] Pasteur Institute, CNRS URA 2182, F75015, Paris, France

 

60. Processing of words related to a previously solved problem. Cognitive response to problem-relatedness depends on working memory capacity 

Marek Kowalczyk [1]

[1] Adam Mickiewicz University, Institute of Psychology, Poznań, Poland

 

61. How Much Do We Consciously See And Remember Across Of Fixations During A Search Task? 

Kaunitz LN [1], Rowe EG [1], Tsuchiya N [1,2].

 [1] School of Psychology and Psychiatry; Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences; Monash University, [2] Decoding and Controlling Brain Information, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan

 

62. Vividness of memory and post-coding events. 

Ayako Onzo [1], Ken Mogi [2]

[1] Kinjo Gakuin University, [2] Sony Computer Science Laboratory

 

63. Recollection of episodic memory with feeing of nostalgia: Autonoetic consciousness of remembering

Jun Kawaguchi [1], Megumi Senda [1]

[1] Department of Psychology, Nagoya University, Japan

 

 

Metacognition and Decision Processes 

64. Lucid dreaming, introspection and awareness of mind-wandering: behavioural and brain bases

Elisa Filevich [1], Timothy Brick [1] & Simone Kühn [1]

[1] Max Planck Institute for Human Development

 

65. Comparing subjective measures of awareness: implications for methodology and the nature of visual experience. 

Bert Windey [1,2,3], Axel Cleeremans [1,2,3]

[1] ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), Université Libre de Bruxelles, Building C / Campus Erasme CP 602, 808, Route de Lennik, 1070 Bruxelles, Belgium. [2] Center for Research in Cognition and Neurosciences (CRCN), Université Libre de Bruxelles, CP 191, Avenue F.-D. Roosevelt, 50, 1050, Bruxelles, Belgium. [3] Consciousness, Cognition and Computation Group, Université Libre de Bruxelles, CP 191, Avenue F.-D. Roosevelt, 50, 1050, Bruxelles, Belgium.

 

66. Confidence Measurement in the Light of Signal Detection Theory 

Sebastien Massoni [1], Thibault Gajdos [2], Jean-Christophe Vergnaud [3]

[1] Queensland University of Technology, [2] Aix-Marseille University, [3] University of Paris

 

67. Overflow as a strategy for the reduction of redundancy. 

Ken Mogi [1]

[1] Sony Computer Science Laboratories

 

68. Fluency and difficulties in an “aha” experience

Tetsuo Ishikawa [1,3], Mayumi Toshima [2], Viktors Garkavijs [2], Ken Mogi [3]

[1] Tokyo Institute of Technology, [2] Graduate University for Advanced Studies, [3] Sony Computer Science Laboratories

 

69. Self-Awareness mediates Executive Functions and Conceptual Change Processes 

Dimitris Pnevmatikos [1], Stella Vosniadou [2], Nikos Makris [3], Giorgos Kyrianakis [1], Kalliopi Eikospentaki [2], Anna Chountala [2], Despoina Lepenioti [2]

[1] University of Western Macedonia, Greece, [2] National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, [3] Democritus University of Thrace, Greece

 

70. The evolution of metarepresentation: Preschool children, but not chimpanzees, spontaneously prepare for alternative future event outcomes 

[1] School of Psychology, University of Queensland

Jonathan Redshaw [1], Thomas Suddendorf [1]

 

Predictive Processes

71. The effect of expectations on visual processing reverses as stimulus presentation time increases  

Auréliane Pajani [1], Sid Kouider [1]

[1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives & Psycholinguistique, Ecole Normale Supérieure - CNRS, 29 rue d’Ulm, 75005, Paris, France

 

72. Is perceptual presence perceptual? From a predictive coding point of view. 

Ryoji Sato [1]

[1] Monash University

 

73. Subliminal enhancement of predictive effects during syntactic processing in the left inferior frontal gyrus: An MEG study

Kazuki Iijima [1,2,3,4], Kuniyoshi L. Sakaia [1,3]

[1]Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan [2]Brain Science Institute, Tamagawa University, Machida-shi, Tokyo, Japan [3]CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan [4]Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Ichiban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan

  

 Subliminal Processes

74. Rapid natural scene categorization of line drawings is less influenced by amplitude spectra: Evidence from a subliminal perception study 

Wenfeng Chen [1], Jing Liang [1], Yongjin Liu [2], Qiufang Fu [1], Xiaolan Fu [1]

[1] State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China, [2] Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, China

 

75. Learning Human Faces Without Awareness

Felipe Pegado [1], Bart Boets [2,3], Hans Op de Beeck [1]

[1] Laboratory of Biological Psychology, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium, [2] Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium, [3] Parenting and Special Education Research Unit, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.

 

76. Unconscious decisional learning: improving unconscious information processing

Alexandra Vlassova [1], Joel Pearson [1]

[1] University of New South Wales

 

77. Conscious Reflection of Unconscious Contingency Learning 

Li Wang [1], Qian Xu [1], Yi Jiang [1]

[1] State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

79. A trial of Unconscious Hypermnesia at 1 week intervals 

Mitsuko Hayashi [1]

[1] Hokkaido University of Education, Hakodate

 

80. Visuo-tactile interplay in conscious and unconscious numerosity encoding 

Nathan Faivre [1,2], Roy Salomon [1,2], Laurène Vuillaume [1,2] & Olaf Blanke [1,2,3]

[1] Center for Neuroprosthetics, School of Life Sciences, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, [2] Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, [3] Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Geneva 1211, Switzerland

 

81. The perception of subliminal facial expressions in individuals with high and low autistic traits: An event-related potential study

Svjetlana Vukusic [1], David Crewther [1], Joseph Ciorciari [1], Jordy Kaufman [1]

[1] Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia

 

82. Unconscious Priming of Power by Words of Height-related Objects and Its Underlying Neural Mechanism

Li Zheng[1], Lin Li[1], Xiuyan Guo [2,3], Zoltan Dienes[4]

[1]School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [2] Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [3] Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [4] Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science and School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

 

Self, Agency and Action 

83. Dominance of the administrating hand in proprioceptive drifts of self-touch illusion is not applicable when hands are crossed 

Kenri Kodaka [1], Yuki Ishihara [1]

[1] Graduate School of Design and Architecture, Nagoya City University

 

84. The dorsal visual processing stream is critical for resolving biomechanical dilemmas in the selection of hand postures.

Philippe A. Chouinard [1,2,*], Daniel K. Wood [2,3,4,*], Alex J. Major [2], and Melvyn A. Goodale [2]. 

[1] School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia. [2] The Brain and Mind Institute and the Department of Psychology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. [3] Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. [4] Department of Neurobiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA. [*] Both authors contributed equally to this work.

 

85. The “lingering alpha effect”: Baseline alpha-band spectral power differences correlate with susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion 

Timothy Lane [1,2,3], Su-Ling Yeh [4,5,6], Jifan Zhou [4], Ting-Yi Lin [1,4], Chia-Hsin Kuo [1, 4], Cheng-Yun Teng [1, 4]

[1] Graduate Institute of Medical Humanities, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan, [2] Institute of European and American Studies, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, [3] Research Center for Mind, Brain, and Learning, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan, [4] Department of Psychology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, [5] Graduate Institute of Brain and Mind Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, [6] Neurobiology and Cognitive Neuroscience Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

 

86. The Sense of Agency during Verbal Action 

Hannah Limerick [1], David Coyle [1], James W Moore [2,3]

[1] Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol, UK, [2] Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK, [3] School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK.

 

87. Action awareness shapes motor memory consolidation

Arnaud Boutin [1], Herbert Heuer [1], & Arnaud Badets [2]

[1] IfADo - Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund, Germany, [2] Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage, CNRS - UMR 7295, Poitiers, France

 

88. Dissociating perception from action during conscious and unconscious conflict adaptation 

Anne Atas [1], Kobe Desender [2], Wim Gevers [1] & Axel Cleeremans [1]

[1] Center for Research in Cognition and Neurosciences (CRCN), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), [2] Department of Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)

 

89. Positive bias in agency judgment

Tomohisa Asai [1]

[1] NTT Communication Science Laboratories

 

90. Voluntary Action and Time Perception 

Matti Vuorre [1], Janet Metcalfe [1]

[1] Columbia University

 

91. Distortions in the perceived time of actions and their effects as a marker of disturbed sense of agency

Mark J. Yates [1], Yann Chye [1]

[1] Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne 

 

92. Abnormal Imagined Walking in High-Schizotypal Individuals

Naohide Yamamoto [1], Lucinda V. Rohde [1], Saliha Qadir [1]

[1] Department of Psychology, Cleveland State University

 

93. Neural responses to heartbeats dissociate the self as the subject and the self as the object during spontaneous thoughts

Mariana Babo-Rebelo [1], Craig Richter [1], Catherine Tallon-Baudry [1]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) - Ecole Normale Superieure (ENS), 29 Rue d'Ulm, Paris, France

 

94. The Neural Dissociation of Rule-Based and similarity-Based Processing in Implicit Learning

Xiaoli Ling [1], Xiuyan Guo [2,3] , Zoltan Dienes [4]  

[1] School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [2] Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [3] Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, Ministry of Education Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, East China Normal University Shanghai, China, [4] School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Sussex House, Brighton BN1 9RH,United Kingdom Laboratory, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) - Ecole Normale Superieure (ENS), 29 Rue d'Ulm, Paris, France


 

 

ASSC 19 Abstract Submission

 

                                                   SUBMISSIONS ARE NOW CLOSED


  • Oral Communications Schedule : Available here

  • Poster Presentations Schedule : Available here

If you have any questions about your abstract, please send an email to congresassc19@ens.fr

 

The program committee invites submissions for Talk and Poster presentations. The annual ASSC conferences are intended to promote interdisciplinary dialogue in the scientific study of consciousness. ASSC members as well as non-members are encouraged to submit contributions that address current empirical and theoretical issues in the study of consciousness, from the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, medicine, philosophy, computer science, and cognitive ethology. ASSC19 will provide an excellent opportunity for the presentation of new empirical findings or novel theoretical perspectives in an atmosphere that will promote discussion and debate.

The maximum time allocated to each talk is 15 minutes. Speakers should aim to complete their talk in 12 minutes to allow 3 minutes for questions. Any person may present only one submission, but may be co-author on more than one. Submissions for both posters and talks will be accepted (please specify preference). All presenters must register for the conference (registration and payment can be made after acceptance notification has been received). 

We would, however, like you to be aware that there are a limited number of both talk sessions and poster space available. Talks and posters will be selected in preference of the presentations of greatest quality and relevance to the aims of the ASSC. Please note that we anticipate that we will be unable to accept all abstract submissions due to the limited time and space available. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this restriction may cause.

 

ABSTRACT JUDGING CRITERIA

In line with practices at some recent ASSC conferences, abstracts will be judged by the scientific committee "blind" to the list of contributing authors. The abstracts will be judged soley on the quality of the work presented in the abstract and its relevance to consciousness research. Submissions labeled as "POSTER ONLY" will be considered separately and will simply be judged on a decision to accept or reject. The remaining submissions labeled as either "TALK ONLY" or "TALK OR POSTER" will be judged together.

 

TRAVEL AWARD

ASSC19 will not be offering travel awards. This year it has been decided that all available money will be used to subsidise the cost of registration and social events in order to make them as cheap as possible for ALL accademic staff and students attending. This year fees will be substantially reduced compared to previous years and the cost of accommodation will also be low with the availability of affordable hotel rooms that is only a few minutes walk away from the main conference venue.

 

STUDENT POSTER COMPETITION

For each of the poster sessions, there will be three prizes awarded for each of the following category: psychology, neuroscience and philosophy. And one public prize (4 prizes in total). Posters will be categorized by the judges. The four winners will be presented an award on stage just before the final keynote of the conference. The winning posters will also be featured on the ASSC website. The competition is only open to students (post-docs are not eligible).

If you would like to be considered for the student poster competition, then select "YES"  where the form asks, "Would you like to be considered for the student poster prize?"

Note: Prizes will not be awarded for student talk presentations. So, if you select "talk or poster" for your presentation and you are awarded a talk, then you will not be considered for the poster prize.

Airline

 

AIRLINES

THE BEST FARE FOR YOUR AIRLINE TICKET

The AirFrance KLM airlines are pleased to be appointed as the Official Airline Network for ASSC 2015.

Attractive discounts on a wide range of fares on all Air France and KLM flights worldwide. More details here
Event ID Code to keep for the booking: 25258AF

 

 

 

ASSC 19 Accommodation

 

 

Accommodation

 



To facilitate you stay during the ASSC 19 conference, SuiteVoyage has selected hotel rooms near the venue and will accompany you for hotel booking.

http://www.suitevoyage.com/ASSC-6-11-juillet-2015

Any questions, please email: hotels@suitevoyage.com

  

ASSC 19 - Gala Dinner

 

 

 

The conference dinner for ASSC19 will be held on Thursday 9th July at La maison des Polytechniciens (http://www.maisondesx.com) located between the Paris of Ministries and the Paris of artists.

A conference dinner in a prestigious setting with grandiose architecture.  

A historical site from the 18th century combining tradition and modernity.

To register [Click Here]

Admission by ticket. Limited capacity on first-come first served basis.

La Maison des Polytechniciens
12 rue de Poitiers
75005 Paris

Location:
Between Musée d'Orsay and Boulevard Saint-Germain 

Access:
Subway: Solferino, line 12
RER: line C, Musée d'Orsay
Bus: lines, 63, 68, 69, 83, 84, 94

Map:
http://www.maisondesx.com/acces

ASSC 19 - Registration

 

ASSC19 CONFERENCE 

Early Fees (until May 7th)

Late Fees (until June 25th)

On site

Conference Registration - Non-Member

390€

440€

500€

Conference Registration - ASSC Member 

280€

330€

500€

Conference Registration - ASSC Student Member

150€

200€

500€

Tutorials (July 7 / Optional)

50€ (each)

50€ (each)

Not available

Gala Dinner - Regular Fees (July 9 / Optional)

80€

80€

Not available

Gala Dinner - Student Fees

60€

60€

Not available

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General terms and conditions:

Payments received after June 12th will not be refundable. Refunds made prior to June 12th will be subject to a 15% processing fee.

 

*Link to currency converter

 

                 ----- CONFERENCE REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS -----

                                      

Conference Registration for STUDENT MEMBERS

Note if you have only just applied for membership you will need to wait a few days for your membership to be processed. You will receive an email notification once your login account has been created.

  • 1) LOGIN: To access the student member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password".  If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.
  • 2) [Click here to proceed to STUDENT MEMBER registration]


Conference Registration for MEMBERS

Note if you have only just applied for membership you will need to wait a few days for your membership to be processed. You will receive an email notification once your login account has been created.

  • 1) LOGIN To access the member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password". If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.


Conference Registration for NON-MEMBERS

Note:  If you are not currently a member, but would like to take advantage of the member's discount, please go to our member registration pagehttp://www.theassc.org/join_assc  You will need to allow a few days for the membership to be processed and will be notified once your login account has been created.              

ASSC 19 Tutorials

 

One of the aims of this meeting is to allow researchers to gain a background in areas that they may know little about. Towards that end a number of tutorials are planned. Some participants in the conference may be interested in learning about technical matters such as EEG or other important brain imaging techniques. Others might enjoy a seminar on a philosophical topic, or a tutorial on relevant matters in cognitive psychology. Tutorial presenters are expected not to present just only their own material, but to give a broader tutorial overview and encourage discussion and debate.

Tutorials will be held in parallel sessions on the morning and afternoon of 7 July 2015. Each tutorial is intended to last approximately three hours. The size of the tutorial audiences will vary between a minimum of 10 to a maximum of around 60 attendees. The cost of attending a tutorial is 50 euros. Tutorials that do not achieve the minimum enrolment of 10 people may not be offered.


MORNING

M1: A primer on experimental hypnosis research - Devin B. Terhune
M2: Novel diagnostic and therapeutical advances in disorders of consciousness - Jacobo D. Stitt
M3: Phenomenal concepts and the phenomenal concept strategy - Pär Sundström
M4: Neural processing of peripersonal space as a fundamental mechanism of self-consciousness - Olafe Blanke & Andrea Serino

AFTERNOON

A1: The metacognitive approach to studying consciousness: promises and caveats - Hakwan Lau
A2: Using Bayes to interpret non-significant results - Zoltan Dienes
A3: The body in the mind: recent advances in interoception and consciousness - Sarah N. Garfinkel
A4: Non-sensory phenomenology - Uriah Kriegel 

 

 

M1 "A primer on experimental hypnosis research"

  • Devin B. Terhune (Ph.D., Department of Experimental Psychology University of Oxford)

The study of hypnosis can provide valuable information regarding the nature of consciousness. Investigating responses to hypnotic suggestions in highly suggestible individuals can yield numerous insights into agency, cognitive control, and conscious awareness. Hypnosis can also be used in an instrumental manner to systematically induce, disrupt, or otherwise alter a host of processes related to consciousness. In turn, hypnosis can aid us in investigating different phenomena that are otherwise difficult to experimentally manipulate in a laboratory setting. The central aim of this tutorial is to give a broad introduction to experimental hypnosis research. First, we will first provide a brief history of hypnosis and introduce the instruments and procedures used by hypnosis researchers. We will devote considerable time to the measurement of hypnotic suggestibility and discuss the developmental and genetic determinants of hypnotic suggestibility and assess evidence for its cognitive and personality correlates. Next, we will describe and weigh the evidence for different theories of hypnosis and review research bearing on the cognitive and neural basis of hypnotic responding. Finally, we will conclude by outlining the use of hypnosis as an experimental technique for studying consciousness and describe how it can be utilized to investigate different research questions. In particular, we will discuss the use of hypnosis in the study of agency, attention, awareness, memory, and perception. This tutorial will provide attendees with a comprehensive understanding of current knowledge of hypnosis.

M2 "Novel diagnostic and therpeutical advances in disorders of consciousness" 

  • Jacobo D. Sitt (MD, PhD - Unicog Lab, NeuroSpin Centre, CEA/Saclay, Institute du Cerveau et de la Moelle Epiniere, Paris)

Advances in modern medicine have led to a new clinical, scientific and ethical challenge. Increasingly more patients survive catastrophic brain injuries, but remain in disordered consciousness conditions, such as the vegetative (VS) or minimally conscious state (MCS). Recent brain imaging and neurophysiological studies have enhanced our understanding of the incredible variability underlying these conditions,including patients who are deemed to be in a VS, but show evidence of intact consciousness with functional neuroimaging. Here, neuroscientists face a unique challenge: how do we take knowledge of the rich body of scientific studies conducted with individual/small groups of patients, in order to create tools that are useful for all of them? In this tutorial, we will introduce the audience to Disorders of Consciousness, and explore the clinical, scientific and ethical challenges they present. We will explore the recent findings on brain network dysfunction underlying these conditions. We will then explore the latest advances in diagnostic tools that bypass potentially damaged motor output systems to detect conscious processing. Third, we will explore exciting new advances in the field of therapeutics for disorders of consciousness, including brain electrical stimulation (i.e., transcranial direct current stimulation). Lastly we will explore how these results generalize to other altered states of consciousness, such as sleep or anesthesia, and what this endeavor can teach us about consciousness in a broader sense. Ultimately, we will synergistically pull together these topics within the framework of the current neuroscientific theories of consciousness, and explore the lines of evidence they contribute towards consolidating societal understanding of awareness, or the lack thereof.

 

 

M3 "Phenonemal concepts and the phenomenal concept strategy"

  • Pär Sundström (Umeå University)

Phenomenal concepts are the concepts we employ when we think about our conscious states in the first person, as when I attend to a pain I currently undergo and think, “this feeling is unpleasant.” Such concepts have been the focus of much discussion in recent philosophy. Perhaps most saliently, they are a corner-stone of the widely pursued “phenomenal concept strategy” for defending physicalism (Loar 1990/1997; Papineau 2002). There is little agreement about how exactly phenomenal concepts should be understood, what the best version of the phenomenal concept strategy is, and what is distinctive of this strategy. This tutorial has the following aims: 

1. To introduce the problems that the phenomenal concept strategy is designed to solve. We will focus especially on the “explanatory gap” and distinguish different ways of understanding that gap. 

2. Distinguish a range of solutions to these problems, and locate the phenomenal concept strategy among them. Here we will especially focus on varieties of what Stoljar (2005) has called the “missing concept strategy” and how this differs from the phenomenal concept strategy. 

3. Discuss considerations for and against the phenomenal concept strategy and competing strategies for defending physicalism. 

 

In addition, the tutorial will discuss at least two issues concerning phenomenal concepts that do not directly pertain to the issue of physicalism. First, it will consider the idea that phenomenal concepts can help explain our first-personal access to conscious states. Second, it will discuss whether phenomenal concepts can only be acquired from experience, as is often but not always supposed (see for example Ball 2009). 

 

M4 : "Neural processing of peripersonal space as a fundamental mechanism of self-consciousness" 

  • Olafe Blanke (Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Brain-Mind Institute / Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) & Andrea Serino (Center for Neuroprosthetics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) 

Consciousness includes the subjective experience of being a self. Self experience is grounded at the physicality of the body, as we normally perceive our Self as located within a body that we own (body ownership or self identification), which occupies a given location in space (self location) and which  faces  the  world  from  a  specific  perspective   (first  person  perspective).   These three components constitute Bodily Self Consciousness (BSC). In this tutorial, we will present current knowledge about the mechanisms underlying the neural representation  and  the  subjective  experience  of  BSC.  We  claim  that  BSC  arises  from  the integration of multisensory and motor signals related to the body and the space surrounding the body, i.e. the peripersonal space. We will review neurophysiological data showing how tactile, proprioceptive, visual, auditory and vestibular signals are integrated at level of single neurons in parietal, posterior-temporal and motor areas. We will present neuroimaging data showing how interoceptive  inputs  from  inside  the  body  are  also  integrated  with  exteroceptive  body-related signals. We will describe neuropsychological cases showing how brain damages affecting those multisensory-motor integration areas result in phenomenologically complex, but fully explainable, alteration  of BSC (e.g., out of body experience,  feeling of a presence).  We will show how it is possible to alter BSC in healthy participants by manipulating multisensory inputs in well-designed psychophysical experiments, using robotics and virtual reality. Our tutorial will be of interest and accessible to all ASSC members, with any expertise (e.g., psychology, philosophy, biology, medicine) interested in the neural mechanisms of self- consciousness.

 

A1 "The metacognitive approach to studying consciousness: promises and caveats"

  • Hakwan Lau  (UCLA Psychology Department)

There’s been a spate of interest in using metacognitive measures in perceptual studies, in both neuroscience and psychophysics. While understanding the mechanisms for metacognition may be interesting in its own right, many have also seen the potential of relating these findings to our understanding of perceptual awareness. As such, several recent studies directly addressing questions coming out from debates in this meeting have adopted what we can call the metacognitive approach. In this tutorial we introduce the basic concepts involved in this approach, reviewing conceptual issues, common criticisms and problems, as well as technical challenges in actual data analysis. Why is the approach perceived by some to be superior to other more traditional approaches? How do we choose between the different analytic measures and how do we interpret them? Throughout we assume a minimal background, but we also make sure experienced researchers can also benefit from discussion of more intricate technical problems seen in the literature. There will also be discussion of what recent findings in this area from various laboratories mean for current debates, including theoretical arguments from philosophy. 

A2 "Using Bayes to interpret non- significant results"

  • Zoltan Dienes (School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton)

This tutorial was run at ASSC 17 in San Diego. I am proposing to run a very similar one again as Bayes becomes increasingly recognized as a necessary inferential technique (just this year the Association for Psychological Science declared that results sections in any of their journals could be purely Bayesian with no significance testing). I will incorporate the latest thinking on the material (it is an area of rapid development). 

The purpose of the tutorial is to present simple tools for dealing with non-significant results. In particular, people will be taught how to apply Bayes Factors to draw meaningful inferences from non-significant data, using free easy-to-use on-line software: Software which allows one to determine whether there is strong evidence for the null and against one’s theory, or if the data are just insensitive, a distinction p_values cannot make. These tools have greater flexibility than power calculations and allow null results to be interpreted over a wider range of situations.   Such tools should allow the publication of null results to become easier. 

While the tools will be of interest to all scientists, they are especially relevant to researchers interested in the conscious/unconscious distinction, because inferring a mental state is unconscious often rests on affirming a null result. For example, for perception to be below an objective threshold, discrimination about stimulus properties must be at chance. Similarly, for perception to be below a subjective threshold by the zero correlation criterion, ability to discriminate one’s own accuracy must be at chance with a meta-d’ etc.  To interpret a non-significant result, what is needed is a non-arbitrary specification of the  distribution of discrimination abilities given conscious knowledge. Conventional statistics cannot solve this problem, but Bayes Factors provide an easy simple solution. The solution is vital for progress in the field, as so many conclusions of unconscious mental states rely on null results with no indication of whether the non-significant result is purely due to data insensitivity. 

 

A3 : "The body in the mind: recent advances in interoception and consciousness"

  • Sarah N. Garfinkel (Department of Psychiatry, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex)

Interoception is the body-to-brain axis of sensation concerning the state of the internal body and its visceral organs. Interoceptive ability has implications for a variety of conscious experiences. For example, interoception can shape our experience of emotions as individuals more attuned to bodily responses experience emotions with heightened intensity. Renewed interest in interoception parallels a growing appreciation that cognition is also embodied, and that cognitive and emotional processes are biased/altered by bodily changes. Correspondingly, neuroscientists, psychologists and physiologists are currently focusing efforts on characterizing how and when internal bodily signals might guide cognition, with recent work demonstrating that enhanced interoceptive accuracy can improve memory and decision making. This tutorial will summarize key recent findings linking interoception to cognition and emotion and discuss further ways individual differences in interoception may influence a range processes pertaining to consciousness.

Despite this historic and recent interest in interoception, the literature to date remains inconsistent in the methods used to assess interoceptive ability. Previously, the terms ‘interoceptive awareness’ and ‘interoceptive sensitivity’ have been treated as synonymous and interchangeable, without deep consideration as to whether the mode of evaluation indeed assessed objective interoceptive accuracy (e.g. behavioural testing such as performance on heartbeat perception tests), metacognitive awareness (e.g. confidence-accuracy correspondence) or subjective interoceptive sensibility (e.g. as assessed via self-report questionnaires). This tutorial will discuss and critically evaluate the different approaches to interoception to better inform future research aimed at delineating effects on cognition, emotion and consciousness.  

 

 

A4 : "Non-sensory phenomenology"

  • Uriah Kriegel (Institut Jean Nicod)           

Early discussions of phenomenal consciousness have concentrated the questions of physicalist reductions and reductive explanation, and accordingly focused on manifest, uncontroversial kinds of conscious experience, in particular the phenomenology of pain and color perception. As debates over reduction have entered a phase of stalemate, recent work on phenomenal consciousness has featured an orthogonal interest in the kinds and variety of phenomenology in our stream of consciousness. Accordingly, a number of interrelated debates have emerged on the existence and character of controversial types of phenomenology. Perhaps the best-­‐known is the debate over the existence of a sui generis, irreducible cognitive phenomenology – a phenomenology proper to thought. Another concerns the existence of a sui generis phenomenology of agency. Such debates bring up a more general question: how many types of sui generis, irreducible phenomenology do we have to posit to just be able to correctly describe the stream of consciousness? This workshop will introduce participants to these newer debates in the philosophy of consciousness: after presenting a general framework for systematic treatment of the relevant issues, it will focus in turns on the debates over cognitive phenomenology, agentive phenomenology, and emotional phenomenology. In each case, a complete taxonomy of positions in the extant literature will be offered, reflecting the logical geography of the debate; two main positioned will then be identified and developed slightly more fully; the central arguments for each of these two positions will be laid out; and the most prominent objections to each will be presented. 

  

  

  

 

ASSC 19 Symposia

 

SYMPOSIUM 1: Unconscious working memory?

Summary:

William James (1890), the father of psychology, already stated what seemed to him an undeniable fact of life: “Without memory no conscious sensation, without memory no consciousness.” Since then, little has changed. Both conscious experience and working memory are widely regarded as inextricably linked, not only involving a similar network of brain regions, but also the ability to accurately report their contents. Prominent theories even feature awareness as a crucial and integral part of working memory, insinuating that the two may be indistinguishable.

Recent evidence, however, questioned this view. Consciousness may neither be compulsory for working memory, nor may all of the contents of working memory be directly reportable. Instead, it seems possible that information can be maintained for several seconds outside the realms of awareness. If true, the field of consciousness research might have reached a critical turning point, opening up venues for refined theories and novel sets of questions. The purpose of this symposium will therefore be to further explore and discuss this exciting phenomenon, its nature, and implications: Was William James really wrong? Does unconscious working memory truly exist or has another unconscious process been discovered?


Chair: Sébastien Marti, NeuroSpin CEA Seaclay - Cognitive Neuroimaging, Inserm U. 992

Talk 1. Johan Eriksson (Umeå center for Functional Brain Imaging, and dept. of Integrative Medical Biology, Umeå University)

Maintaining non-consciously presented information over brief periods of time engages the prefrontal cortex

 

Talk 2. Sébastien Marti

Perception and working memory during conscious and unconscious processing

 

Talk 3. Jean-Rémi King (NeuroSpin CEA Saclay – Cognitive Neuroimaging unit, Inserm U.992. Institut du cerveau et de la moelle épinière, Inserm U.975)

Tracking the time course of maintained visual representations during backward masking: an MEG study

 

Talk 4. David Soto (Imperial College London, Department of Medicine, Centre of Neuroscience, Charing Cross Campus)

On the independence of visual awareness and working memory processes


 

SYMPOSIUM 2: Levels of consciousness

Summary:

Theories of consciousness are typically taken to involve two dimensions of analysis: one dimension concerns the organism’s conscious contents, and the other dimension concerns the organism’s conscious level. Relative to the amount of attention that the contents of consciousness have received, the notion of a conscious level has been neglected. The aim of this symposium is to bring together theorists from various perspectives in order to advance our understanding of levels of consciousness from both empirical and conceptual perspectives.

The symposium will address the following questions: How are the levels of consciousness are related to the contents of consciousness? How is the notion of a level of consciousness understood in the context of epilepsy, the vegetative state and minimally conscious state? Do different fields within consciousness science employ the same notion of a level of consciousness, or do different fields operate with distinct conceptions of a conscious level? How can one measure a creature’s level of consciousness? And how might an account of levels inform theories of consciousness?  

 

Chair: Tim Bayne

Talk 1. Tim Bayne (University of Manchester)

What is a Level of Consciousness? 

 

Talk 2.  Hal Blumenfeld (Yale)
Impaired levels of consciousness in focal and generalized seizures 

 

Talk 3. Adrian Owen (University of western Ontario)

Assessing Levels of Consciousness after Serious Brain Injury

 

Talk 4. Lisa Miracchi (NYU)
Can we Understand the Levels of Consciousness without Distinguishing Kinds of Conscious Contents?

 


SYMPOSIUM 3: Consciousness without control: How do phenomenology and function change when prefrontal control is reduced and what does this mean for the development of consciousness?

Summary:

There has been extensive and important work in consciousness studies examining the relation between conscious phenomenology and prefrontal control. Conscious, top-down, endogenous attention and executive decision-making and planning are clearly related to distinctive patterns of frontal control and coordination. But what happens to phenomenology and function when prefrontal control is diminished or attenuated. Does consciousness simply fade or disappear? Or does it take different forms? This question is particularly important in understanding the development of consciousness, given that prefrontal control clearly increases with age. In this symposium, four investigators using very different methods describe function and phenomenology in cases of diminished prefrontal involvement. These include cases of electrical disruption of frontal function and administration of psilocybin and LSD, brief exposures of multiple crowded objects in “ensembles” and perception and cognition in young children. In all these cases prefrontal control is attenuated.There appear to be some striking similarities in function and experience in these cases. With diminished prefrontal control, attention, experience and cognition may become distributed rather than focused, holistic rather than analytic and more bottom-up and exogenously determined, rather than top-down and endogenously determined. There is also evidence for increases in flexibility, and in some kinds of learning and creativity. Attenuated prefrontal control may have some computational and cognitive benefits that balance the costs of diminished focus, inhibition and executive function, and may be accompanied by distinctive kinds of phenomenology. This may help us understand what it is like to be a baby or young child, and why. 

 

Chair: Alison Gopnik, Depts. of Psychology and Philosophy, University of California at Berkley

Talk 1. Sharon Thompson-Schill (University of Pennsylvania)

When a little frontal cortex goes a long way 

 

Talk 2. Robin Carhart-Harris (Imperial College) 

Psychedelics alter brain network behaviour in manner that is the inverse of what is seen in normal brain development 

 

Talk 3. David Whitney (University of California Berkeley)  

Objects, crowds, and the dualism of perceptual experience 

 

Talk 4. Alison Gopnik (Depts. of Psychology and Philosophy, University of California at Berkeley)

When children are more open-minded learners than adults are: Childhood as simulated annealing

  


  

SYMPOSIUM 4: The no-report paradigm: a promising avenue for consciousness research?

Summary:

The core issue of consciousness research is the neuronal basis of conscious phenomenal experience. To study phenomenology, however, third-person experimenters seem obliged to resort to verbal or manual reports from the studied subjects to know about the presence or absence of consciousness. This might have biased much of the search for the neural correlate of consciousness (NCC) over the last decades. Have we not confounded the neural causes of consciousness with the consequences of consciousness? Did we not confuse the processes that generate visual experience with the cognitive processes enabling us to decide on the conscious content, attend to it, store it, and report about it?

Recently, various studies tried to dissociate neural activity that gives rise to conscious phenomenology from the activity that enables the reports via executive and cognitive functions, including attention and working memory. In addition, new paradigms have been developed to study conscious experience in the absence of report. We will discuss those new approaches and ask whether they bring us any further in understanding consciousness.

That is the topic of this symposium. It brings together scientists that have used no-report paradigms to study consciousness. Do their results really provide another perspective? Are our no-report paradigms suggesting NCCs different from the traditional approach? Or are we throwing away the baby with the bathwater? After presenting results and arguments, we will devote time to a panel discussion to answer these questions in a dialogue with the audience. Initial and final polls will engage audience and estimate the attitudes of the current researchers about reports, as well as the impact of the here-proposed symposium.

 

Chair: Naotsugu Tsuchiya (School of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Biomedical and Psychological Sciences Monash University)

Talk 1. Stefan Frässle (Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Philipps-University)

Frontal activity in binocular rivalry relates to introspection and action but not to perception

 

Talk 2. Melanie Wilke (Department of Cognitive Neurology, University Medicine Goettingen )          

Dissociation between perceptual modulation in report- and no-report conditions in firing rates and local field potentials in area V4 and the thalamic pulvinar

 

Talk 3. Victor Lamme (Department of Psychology (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)  

Can we ever prove seeing without knowing? Neural and psychophysical signatures of conscious perception in the absence of report.

ASSC 18 - Registration

 ASSC18 CONFERENCE Early Fees  (Prior to May 15th)Late Fees
Conference Registration - Non-member AU $450 AU $500
Conference Registration - ASSC Member
AU $350
AU $400
Conference Registration - ASSC Student Member AU $150 AU $200
Conference Registration - Local UQ Student
AU $75
AU $100
Conference Dinner (optional) AU $100 Au $100
Tutorials & Short-Course
AU $50 (Each)
AU $50 (Each)
Post-Conference Panpsychism Workshop (Byron Bay)
SOLD OUT
SOLD OUT
   

 

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  • 1) LOGIN To access the member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password". If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.


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Conference Registration for UQ Students

If you are currently enrolled as an undergraduate, or graduate student at the university of queensland you are able to register at a reduced price. You will need to provide your student number and UQ email address as proof of your student status.

ASSC 18 - Registration - UQ Students - Late

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • PRIMARY AFFILIATION (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • EMAIL (For Receipt): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 UQ STUDENT TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE $100 (automatically included)

  • MORNING SHORT COURSE - "Integrated Information Theory Of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 1 - Andreas Keller: "Olfactory Consciousness"
  • SOLD OUT   TUTORIAL 2 - Joel Pearson: "Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus"
  • CLOSED      TUTORIAL 3 - Colin Hales: CANCELLED
  • TUTORIAL 4 - Claude Touzet: "Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness"
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER - Dinner will be a relaxed feast amongst native Australian Animals at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending
  • SOLD OUT    POST-CONFERENCE SATTELITE EVENT - Byron Bay Panpsychism workshop

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSC 18 - Registration - NonMember - Late

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • PRIMARY AFFILIATION (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • EMAIL (For Receipt): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 NON-MEMBER TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE $500 (automatically included)

  • MORNING SHORT COURSE - "Integrated Information Theory Of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 1 - Andreas Keller: "Olfactory Consciousness"
  • SOLD OUT   TUTORIAL 2 - Joel Pearson: "Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus"
  • CLOSED      TUTORIAL 3 - Colin Hales: CANCELLED
  • TUTORIAL 4 - Claude Touzet: "Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness"
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER - Dinner will be a relaxed feast amongst native Australian Animals at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending
  • SOLD OUT   POST-CONFERENCE SATTELITE EVENT - Byron Bay Panpsychism workshop

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSC 18 - Registration - UQ Students - Early

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • UQ STUDENT NUMBER: *
  • EMAIL (uq student email): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 UQ STUDENT TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE $75 (automatically included)

  • MORNING SHORT COURSE - "Integrated Information Theory Of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 1 - Andreas Keller: "Olfactory Consciousness"
  • SOLD OUT   TUTORIAL 2 - Joel Pearson: "Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus"
  • CLOSED      TUTORIAL 3 - Colin Hales: CANCELLED
  • TUTORIAL 4 - Claude Touzet: "Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness"
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER - Dinner will be a relaxed feast amongst native Australian Animals at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSC 18 - Registration - NonMember - Early

STEP 1: PROVIDE ATTENDEE & PAYMENT DETAILS

  • FULL NAME (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • PRIMARY AFFILIATION (to appear on Name Badge): *
  • EMAIL (For Receipt): *
  • CONTACT PHONE: *

STEP 2: SELECT ITEMS

       1 ASSC NON-MEMBER TICKET TO THE MAIN CONFERENCE $450 (automatically included)

  • MORNING SHORT COURSE - "Integrated Information Theory Of Consciousness"
  • TUTORIAL 1 - Andreas Keller: "Olfactory Consciousness"
  • SOLD OUT   TUTORIAL 2 - Joel Pearson: "Seeing what's not there and measuring it: Conscious perception without a stimulus"
  • CLOSED      TUTORIAL 3 - Colin Hales: CANCELLED
  • TUTORIAL 4 - Claude Touzet: "Theory of Neuronal Cognition and Consciousness"
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER - Dinner will be a relaxed feast amongst native Australian Animals at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
  •  CONFERENCE DINNER (Add Additional Seat) - Partner Attending

STEP 3: PRESS "Register & Pay" TO PROCEED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consciousness - here, there, everywhere? The prospects for panpsychism

Sunday 20th and Monday 21st of July 2014

Venue: The Byron at Byron Bay http://www.thebyronatbyron.com.au/   Byron Bay is 90min south of Brisbane (View Google Map)

Organizers: Chair - Naotsugu Tsuchiya (Monash University), Bruno van Swinderen (U of Queensland), Olivia Carter (U of Melbourne)

Registration: $200  -  SOLD OUT

Contact: for questions about this event please contact Naotsugu Tsuchiya

Confirmed speakers:
  • David Chalmers (philosophy, ANU, NYU)
  • Monica Gagliano (evolutionary biology, U of Western Australia)
  • Yasuo Kuniyoshi (robotics, U of Tokyo)
  • Larisa Albantakis (neuroscience, U of Wisconsin)
  • Mandyam Srinivasan (neuroscience, U of Queensland)
  • Giulio Tononi (neuroscience, U of Wisconsin)

 

Main theme: Panpsychism is a meta-theoretical framework, which assumes consciousness is a fundamental aspect of the universe. There are many variants of panpsychism, but all admit that organisms, large or small, and even inorganic materials, can be conscious to variable degrees, with consciousness of higher organisms being more sophisticated and complex than that of lower organisms. Common to all panpsychist approaches is the strong belief that "consciousness cannot emerge from nothing". By contrast, emergentist views posit that "some" special condition is required to ensure that some "biological" organisms come to possess consciousness. The emergence view has been popular since the last century, mainly due to the success of physical science in other domains. However, emergence as radical as consciousness is unprecendented in any field of science, and the special conditions that would be necessary for the emergence of consciousness remain unspecified.

 

Objectives: In this workshop, we will re-consider panpsychism – long neglected –- from historical, philosophical, and neuroscientific viewpoints. As a neuroscientific approach that shares some essential intuitions with panpsychism, we will examine the Integrated Information Theory of consciousness. In so doing, we will revisit many fundamental questions that can potentially be addressed with a rigorous theoretical approach and empirical investigations. The main questions we will discuss are the following:

  1. Can one conceive of "continuity" of consciousness from conception to death, across evolution, across species from humans, mice, flies, worms, to unicellular organisms, and across inorganic systems, like robots and Internet? 
  2. What is the "unit" of consciousness? If panpsychism is true, can any cell in my body be conscious at the same time as I am conscious thanks to my brain (micro-panpsychism problem). Can a society that includes myself also be conscious (macro-panpsychism problem)? Integrated information theory avoids this "combination problem" by supposing only "local maxima" matters. But why would it be that only local maxima matter? Are there other principled explanations?
  3. How does the current neuroscientific study of 'non-conscious processing' challenge panpsychism? Alternatively, what can panpsychism offer for interpreting 'non-conscious processing'?  Is it possible that the level of consciousness of lower animals or in inorganic objects is similar (or even lower) to that of non-conscious processing in us?
  4. If there is consciousness in other animals, what "kind" of experience or qualia do they experience? Can a quantitative theory be developed that can predict not only the quantity but also the quality of experience in other animals?
  5. Is it possible to empirically test any panpsychistic claim? Could we test for the presence of consciousness in lower animals, in robots or within the Internet? And what would a test be like?


To restrict the scope of the discussions, we will consider "consciousness" as raw experience.  Thus we will deliberately not discuss the role of self-consciousness, the requirement for language, and embodiment.


References:

 

Accommodation Details

The conference will be held at The Byron at Byron Bay http://www.thebyronatbyron.com.au/ Rooms at this spectacular venue cost $300/night but can be shared by two people.

Note: For alternative accommodation options visit the Byron Bay accommodation website http://www.byron-bay.com/accommodation