Public

ASSC 21 Visa information

VISA INFORMATION

 

All foreign nationals wanting to come to China must be able to submit statutory documents at the border verifying the reasons for their stay, their means of support, and accommodation arrangements. As a rule, unless you are exempt, you are required to have a visa. It must be applied for from the relevant Chinese embassy or consulate in the applicant’s country of residence.


A certain number of nationalities are exempt from the short-stay visa requirement in China. Nationals of Japan, Singapore, and Brunei are exempt from visa requirement.

 

Here is the list of agreements on mutual visa exemption between China and foreign Countries: http://cs.mfa.gov.cn/zlbg/tyxy_660627/P020161129674689142759.doc

 

Be careful to validate that your passport category is covered by agreement on visa exemption.

 

For more information regarding visa information, please visit the official Chinese governmental website: http://cs.mfa.gov.cn/wgrlh/lhqz/lhqzjjs/t1095035.shtml or have a look at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_China 

 

 

LETTER OF INVITATION

 

After identifying that a visa is needed, the Local Organizing Committee can provide you an Invitation letter. To request a Letter of Invitation please send your request to assc21@psych.ac.cn and provide the following information: Full name, Gender, Date of birth, Nationality, Current Residency, and Passport Number.

 

 

Visa Information

VISA INFORMATION

 

All foreign nationals wanting to come to China must be able to submit statutory documents at the border verifying the reasons for their stay, their means of support, and accommodation arrangements. As a rule, unless you are exempt, you are required to have a visa. It must be applied for from the relevant Chinese embassy or consulate in the applicant’s country of residence.


A certain number of nationalities are exempt from the short-stay visa requirement in China. Nationals of Japan, Singapore, and Brunei are exempt from visa requirement.

 

Here is the list of agreements on mutual visa exemption between China and foreign Countries: http://cs.mfa.gov.cn/zlbg/tyxy_660627/P020161129674689142759.doc

 

Be careful to validate that your passport category is covered by agreement on visa exemption.

 

For more information regarding visa information, please visit the official Chinese governmental website: http://cs.mfa.gov.cn/wgrlh/lhqz/lhqzjjs/t1095035.shtml

or have a look at wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_China 

 

 

LETTER OF INVITATION

 

After identifying that a visa is needed, the Local Organizing Committee can provide you an Invitation letter. To request a Letter of Invitation please send your request to assc21@psych.ac.cn and provide the following information: Full name, Gender, Date of birth, Nationality, Current Residency, and Passport Number.

 

 

ASSC 21 – Travel and local information

 

Transportation to the Conference

  

ASSC21 will be held at Beijing International Convention Center, No.8 Beichen Dong Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing. For Taxi, show this to the driver: 北京国际会议中心, 北京市朝阳区北辰东路8号。

 

 

From Beijing Capital International Airport: 1) airport shuttle line 5, to Asian Games Village (Anhui Bridge); 2) airport express subway (Terminal 3-----Sanyuanqiao) ----- line 10 (Sanyuanqiao-----4 stations---- Beitucheng) ----- line 8 (Beitucheng-----Olympic Sports Center). For more information: http://en.bcia.com.cn/

 

 

 

From Beijing Station: subway line 2 (Beijing Station--Guloudajie) --- line 8 (Guloudajie--Olympic Sports Center)

 

From Beijing South Station: subway line 4 (Beijing South Station--Xuanwumen) --- line 2 (Xuanwumen--Guloudajie) --- line 8 (Guloudajie-- Olympic Sports Center)

Check this website for subway route planning:

http://www.bjsubway.com/en/subwaymap/station_map.html

Choose the start station and the destination, for example, Airport Express Terminal 3 and Line 8 Olympic Sports Center.

 

General Transport Information of Beijing

Beijing Subway possesses 18 subway lines in Beijing covering most of the city. There are more details and a riding scheme planner at its official website: http://www.bjsubway.com/en/index.html. The sign below are shown when there is a station nearby.

 


Public Buses are also available in Beijing yet most of them are for self-service so it is advised to use them only when accompanied by a local guide.

Transportation Smart card is used for the subway and the bus, and can be rented with credits at any subway station. Later, it can be returned at stations listed below for refunds.

Subway Lines

Stations

Line 1

Guchenglu, Sihui

Line 2

Fuxingmen, Xizhimen

Line 5

Lishuiqiao, Yonghegong, Dongdan, Songjiazhuang, Xizhimen

Line 8

Jianguomen, Beitucheng

Line 10

Shaoyaoju, Zhichunlu

Line 13

Dongzhimen

Airport Express

T3 of Capital Airport

 

Taxi can be hailed around the city and most drivers know a bit of English. Be sure to use the official ones with a sign on the roof and a driver’s registration card. To avoid any trouble, please ask for receipts after the ride. Taxi reservation: 96106.

 

Local Tourist Spots and Restaurants

N

 

Beijing International Convention Center is to the east of the central area of the facilities for 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.

 

 

The west and north side of the convention center is surrounded by Olympic Green. The National Stadium, known as the Bird’s Nest, and the National Aquatics Center, known as the Water Cube, are both near the Convention Center, within 500m. They are shining examples of the main sport buildings for 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.

 

To the South, there is a Relics Park for the capital city wall of Yuan Dynasty. A part of the ancient city wall is preserved in the park together with beautiful natural scenery.


 

To the east side of the convention center stand many restaurants, where you can enjoy Chinese food or choose fast food for quick refreshment. There are Jingweizhai (京味斋,Beijing Flavor Restaurant), Qiaojiangnan (俏江南,Fashionable South Food), Shanghai Xiaonanguo (上海小南国, Shanghai’s South State Food) and others all providing some excellent Chinese cuisines. Also, if you prefer familiar food, there are western restaurant and fast food like KFC and Mc Donald’s.

 

Famous Tourist Attractions

The Palace Museum- The Forbidden City: http://en.dpm.org.cn/

The Great Wall: http://www.badaling.cn/language/en.asp

Summer palace: http://www.summerpalace-china.com/ywy/index.html

Other Information: http://www.ebeijing.gov.cn/Travel/

 

ASSC 21 Tutorials

 

TUTORIAL 1: “The Use of Sensory Deprivation and Sensory Restriction paradigms”

Oliver Mason (University of Surrey, UK; University College London, UK)

1. Background to use of sensory deprivation paradigms in research focusing on their use in inducing altered states of consciousness, dissociation. hallucinations and other psychotic-like states. Some coverage of psychophysiological findings related to sensory deprivation. Coverage of ethical issues in research using these paradigms. 

2. Provision of equipment including ganzfeld goggles and auditory stimuli to demonstrate sensory restriction paradigms.  

3. Facilitated discussion of the topic.  

 

Note: There will be equipment available for attenders to try out including ganzfeld goggles and auditory stimuli to demonstrate sensory restriction paradigms. This will feed into discussion of potential research uses as well as broader discussion points arising from the background covered in the tutorial.  

 

TUTORIAL 2: Why Illusionism The Case for a Progressive Consciousness Research Program 

Daniel Dennett (Tufts University, US) 

Keith Frankish (The Open University, UK) 

Enoch Lambert (Tufts University, US)

Illusionism is the view that there is no such thing as phenomenal properties of consciousness. What needs explaining are not phenomenal properties, but the strong intuitive pull that there are such. While the position is often dismissed if considered at all, strong defenses of it exist. Most recently, Keith Frankish, in “Illusionism as a Theory of Consciousness”, has forcefully re-advanced illusionism as a primary contender in consciousness debates. His paper places the view in relation to other leading ones and nicely reviews the arguments for and against it. He also helpfully reviews the positions of previous illusionists such as Daniel Dennett, Nicholas Humphrey, Derk Pereboom, and Georges Rey.

The proposed tutorial aims to promote understanding of the illusionist position and to show why, despite initial appearances, it can be considered the most promising position on consciousness for scientific research. To take a simple and much discussed phenomenon, does color exist in the physical world? If not, is it an illusion? Better answers grow out of the illusionist position.

Illusionism is often dismissed due to charges of denying the undeniable data of personal introspection. But the case for illusionism reveals the persistent incoherencies that arise when trying to pin down the alleged data, as well as when trying to account for experimental data indicating major mistakes in what we attribute to consciousness. The first part of the tutorial will address these issues.

Trying to explain why we say what we do about consciousness is one of the more important tasks for any theory of consciousness. Illusionists such as Nicholas Humphrey and Daniel Dennett have offered some of the more intriguing possible explanatory hypotheses for how we come to have the illusion of phenomenal consciousness. The second part of the tutorial will look at how such hypotheses can help move the scientific investigation of consciousness forward.

 

TUTORIAL 3: Quantifying metacognition: measures, models and theories 

Stephen FlemingUniversity College London, UK 

Metacognition describes the ability to reflect on and control our performance in various domains – “thinking about thinking”. Measurement of metacognition typically focuses on the correspondence between confidence and trial-­by-­trial accuracy. In general, for healthy subjects endowed with metacognitive sensitivity, when one is confident, one is more likely to be correct. Thus the degree of association between accuracy and confidence can be taken as a quantitative measure of metacognition. Many studies use a statistical correlation coefficient (e.g. Pearson's r) or its variant to assess this degree of association, but such measures are susceptible to undesirable influences from factors such as response biases and often conflate task performance with metacognitive ability. This tutorial is aimed both at researchers who are seeking a practical introduction to bias-­free methods for quantifying metacognition (e.g. meta-­d’) and experimentalists/theorists who are interested in how these measures connect to recent models of metacognition and awareness. No prior knowledge will be assumed. Part 1 will provide an overview of the topic, explore practical measurement techniques grounded in second-­order reports (e.g. confidence ratings, opt-­out designs), and introduce metacognitive measures based on signal detection theory and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis that are “bias free”. I will distinguish between the concepts of metacognitive bias, sensitivity and efficiency. Wherever possible, worked examples using MATLAB code will be provided, and interactive discussion will be encouraged. Part 2 will focus on theories and models of metacognition, in particular recent accounts of performance/confidence dissociations. I will explore the relationship between different facets of metacognition such as confidence and error monitoring, and review evidence on the domain-­generality/specificity of metacognitive processes. I will close by critically examine the relationship between metacognition and primary (e.g. sensory) consciousness.

 

TUTORIAL 4: Computational and Theoretical Foundations of the Predictive Mind 

Ryota Kanai (Araya Brain Imaging, Japan)

Jakob Hohwy (Monash University, Australia) 

The free energy principle and predictive coding hypothesis suggest that the brain performs a statistical inference by making top-down predictions about the environment while constantly updating the estimate with bottom-up prediction errors. There has been a growing interest in the role of predictive processing among consciousness researchers as a possible unifying principle for brain functions associated with conscious experience. The core idea of predictive coding is that the brain learns generative models of the environment from statistical regularities, and uses them to form a hypothesis through perception and acts to test the hypothesis through action by minimizing prediction errors arising from the sensory inputs. This idea unifies perception and action as an integrated system and offers a general theoretical framework to account for learning, attention and intention. In this tutorial, we will introduce the free energy principle and predictive coding at a theoretical level in relation to consciousness. Then, we guide the audience through the mathematical formulations step-by-step in an accessible form. We will start from the basic ideas behind variational Bayesian inference and provide a starting point for those who are interested in learning the theory but find the original papers difficult to follow. In particular, we will make clear the dependency of knowledge across published papers so that new learners can study the relevant papers efficiently. Then, we will discuss current empirical results that have linked conscious perception to the predictive coding framework. Finally, we will discuss how free energy principle and predictive coding can be related to modern deep neural network architecture, and suggest possible implementations into neural networks. We will encourage questions and discussion during the tutorial to facilitate understanding, while providing supplemental online materials for those who wish to study the theories further. 

Note: We will make the tutorial interactive by encouraging questions at several points and by limiting the amount of material we will go through. While the concept of the free energy principle is simple, mathematical details are often rather difficult to tackle; we shall mainly go slowly over this material. We will have an interlude at the 1.20-2 hour mark where we will elicit suggestions and discussion from the audience about how to test the free energy principle empirically. We explicitly schedule 20 minutes for discussion at the end. Prior to the tutorial, we will build a webpage to provide the outline of the tutorial and a list of relevant papers to maximise audience’s gain of knowledge during the tutorial.

 

TUTORIAL 5: Novel neuroimaging techniques for the non-invasive study of consciousness

Lucas Parra (The City University of New York, US)

Jacobo Sitt (Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, France)

Enzo Tagliazucchi (Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Netherlands)

Neuroimaging has consolidated its position as a powerful method for the detection of consciousness in healthy subjects and in unresponsive patients. The standard approach relies on the mass univariate correlations between neurophysiological signals (e.g. BOLD signal in fMRI, spectral power changes in EEG) and tasks or sensory stimulation. Alternatively, the synchronization of spontaneous signal fluctuations has been extensively explored as an index of functional coupling between brain regions

The application of these methods is limited in its capacity to reveal spatio-temporal evolving patterns of connectivity. Another important limitation is their univariate nature, imposing limits on the detection of higher order interactions in the data. Finally, traditional neuroimaging approaches are employed in the context of carefully designed experimental manipulations, but are generally less useful to interrogate the response to the natural stimuli comprising our everyday experience.

We will present a series of cutting-edge methods overcoming these limitations. These are particularly useful for the study of consciousness, since converging evidence suggests that consciousness can be associated to the spatio-temporal complexity of brain activity; in particular, to a large repertoire of dynamic brain states (i.e. differentiation) maintaining a sufficient degree of functional cohesion (i.e. integration). Conscious perception of natural stimuli remains a relatively open subject requiring novel algorithms that can study brain activity independently of well-defined external cues.

Lucas Parra will present algorithms allowing the detection of an attentional state based in inter-subject EEG synchronization to natural stimuli. Enzo Tagliazucchi will discuss the detection of complex patterns such as scale-free avalanches and spatio-temporal correlations in fMRI and M/EEG data, which have been linked to the level of conscious awareness. Finally, Jacobo Sitt will present a computational framework to infer the dynamic evolution of transient network states based on fMRI and M/EEG data, and their association with states of consciousness.

Note: We will not be limited to a theoretical exposition of the methods but will present, instead, live applications to sample data. In these parts of the tutorial the audience will be able to carefully follow the general procedure underlying the methods, understand possible pitfalls and develop an idea of how to apply the tools to their own data. To facilitate the replicability of the tutorial sessions, the sample data and algorithms can be provided to the audience upon request. In each Q&A session we will put the focus on three main points:

       The conditions under which the methods can be applied, including possible pitfalls and artifacts and how to avoid them.

       The interpretation of the results yielded by the methods in neurobiological terms and their usefulness to non-invasively investigate consciousness in humans (with emphasis on information that cannot be provided by classical approaches)

       Brainstorming on possible experimental setups and research questions that can benefit from the methods (with an emphasis on the own research questions of the audience).

 

TUTORIAL 6:A primer on experimental hypnosis research

Devin B. Terhune (University of LondonUK)

Vince Polito (Macquarie UniversityAustralia)

Amanda J. Barnier (Macquarie UniversityAustralia)

The study of hypnosis can provide valuable information regarding the nature of consciousness. Investigating responses to hypnotic suggestions in highly suggestible individuals can yield numerous insights into agency, cognitive control, and conscious awareness. Hypnosis can also be used in an instrumental manner to systematically induce, disrupt, or otherwise alter a host of processes related to consciousness. In turn, hypnosis can aid us in investigating different phenomena that are otherwise difficult to experimentally manipulate in a laboratory setting. The central aim of this tutorial is to give a broad introduction to experimental hypnosis research. First, we will first provide a brief history of hypnosis and introduce the instruments and procedures used by hypnosis researchers. We will devote considerable time to the measurement of hypnotic suggestibility and discuss the developmental and genetic determinants of hypnotic suggestibility and assess evidence for its cognitive and personality correlates. Next, we will describe and weigh the evidence for different theories of hypnosis and review research bearing on the cognitive and neural basis of hypnotic responding. Finally, we will conclude by outlining the use of hypnosis as an experimental technique for studying consciousness and describe how it can be utilized to investigate different research questions. In particular, we will discuss the use of hypnosis in the study of agency, attention, awareness, memory, and perception. This tutorial will provide attendees with a comprehensive understanding of current knowledge of hypnosis.

 

TUTORIAL 7: Using Bayes factors to provide evidence for no effect

Zoltan Dienes (University of Sussex, UK)

I ran Bayes tutorials at ASSC 17 in San Diego and ASSC 19 in Paris. I am proposing to run a very similar one again as Bayes becomes increasingly recognized as a necessary inferential technique (for example the Association for Psychological Science recently declared that results sections in any of their journals could be purely Bayesian with no significance testing). I will incorporate the latest thinking on the material (it is an area of rapid development).

The purpose of the tutorial is to present simple tools for asserting no effect (no conscious knowledge, no interaction, no correlation, etc). In particular, people will be taught how to apply Bayes Factors to draw meaningful inferences from non-significant data, using free easy-to-use on-line software: Software which allows one to determine whether there is strong evidence for the null and against one’s theory, or if the data are just insensitive, a distinction p_values cannot make. These tools have greater flexibility than power calculations and allow null results to be interpreted over a wider range of situations. Such tools should allow the publication of null results to become easier.

While the tools will be of interest to all scientists, they are especially relevant to researchers interested in the conscious/unconscious distinction, because inferring a mental state is unconscious often rests on affirming a null hypothesis. For example, for perception to be below an objective threshold, discrimination about stimulus properties must be at chance. Similarly, for perception to be below a subjective threshold by the zero correlation criterion, ability to discriminate one’s own accuracy must be at chance with a meta-d’ etc. To interpret a non-significant result, what is needed is a non-arbitrary specification of the distribution of discrimination abilities given conscious knowledge. Conventional statistics cannot solve this problem, but Bayes Factors provide an easy simple solution. The solution is vital for progress in the field, as so many conclusions of unconscious mental states rely on null results with no indication of whether the non-significant result is purely due to data insensitivity.

Note: The online software can be used by entering a handful of numbers (e.g. means and standard errors) so the audience can readily work through examples on their laptops, both examples I discuss and also new ones anyone wishes to bring up. I will provide constant examples throughout. Further, past delivery of the seminar (almost monthly over the world for the past several years) has resulted in much discussion, so I can confirm my style does invite audience participation. The topic naturally lends itself, as everyone will have relevant experience (by virtue of being a consumer of significance tests) and any user of statistics will find the material directly relevant, and thus have questions about how it applies to the specifics of their research.

 

TUTORIAL 8: Deep Learning: Implementing Consciousness

Antoine Pasquali (XCompass Ltd.Japan)

68 years have passed since Hebb depicted the first neurological rule that would allow connectionist networks to learn associations between pairs of inputs and outputs. Since then bio-inspired models and algorithms haven’t stopped increasing both in efficacy and complexity, but major breakthroughs have remained scarce and research slow. Recently though, the field has seen a renewed interest with performance achievements at par or better on cognitive abilities that were so far considered unique to the human mind. Indeed, Deep Neural networks are quickly closing the gap to human-level performance in a whole flock of tasks: object classification, facial recognition, speech recognition, medical diagnosis, and even complex planning and decision making such as required by Go playing. Hence, perhaps a relevant question to ask ourselves right now is: How far are we from achieving “Machine Consciousness”? After an introduction to the field, I will clarify the underlying logic of connectionist networks so that they can be fully understood by everyone, independent of their background. I will then explain in detail how different models and methods work (wide panel including, among others, the Perceptron, the Forward/Inverse model, the Metacognitive network, and the Convolutional Neural network), and make an in-depth parallel with the cognitive mechanisms that they replicate. We will discuss the strengths and the weaknesses of these models, as well as the tasks they were designed for and can be further applied to. We will then enumerate together specific cognitive functions in relation to Consciousness and discuss the best methods to implement them. Finally, I will review the main deep learning libraries that are currently available online so that everyone can go back home with the right set of tools to apply deep learning in the context of their own research projects.

 

TUTORIAL 9: The empirical study of altered states of consciousness: Common standards in the psychometric assessment of subjective experiences

Timo Torsten SchmidtInstitute of Cognitive ScienceGermany

The experimental induction of altered states of consciousness (ASCs) constitutes a unique research opportunity to relate changes in phenomenological states to underlying neuronal mechanisms. A variety of pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological methods, such as breathing techniques or sensory deprivation, can induce ASCs in humans. Subjective reports suggest that ASCs, even when induced by different methods, share certain aspects of experiences. To clarify if shared subjective experiences also share neuronal mechanisms, an accurate psychometric assessment of subjects’ experiences is necessary.

Multiple questionnaires have been developed based on qualitative reports and philosophical conceptualizations to quantify the phenomenology of ASCs. Here, I present an overview on available psychometric tools, their theoretical background, and validation. I will discuss the questionnaires which cover a broad range of different experiences in contrast to those that were designed to assess induction method specific effects, e.g., the effects typical to hallucinogens. Addressing a broad range of ASC experiences is required for the identification of common phenomenological structures of differently-induced ASCs. Based on their phenomenological scope and on how much they have been used in previous studies, I present recommendations for questionnaires to assess ASC phenomena in future neuroscientific experiments. Common standards for this rapidly extending body of research will foster comparability across different phenomenological states (‘phenomenological patterns’) and different studies. The comparison across studies represents an empirical framework to test how alterations in subjective experiences can be mapped onto brain functions and related to current theories on global brain function.

 

TUTORIAL 10: Intra-neuronal origins of consciousness – The ‘Orch OR’ theory

Stuart Hameroff (The University of Arizona, US)

The nature of consciousness, the mechanism by which it occurs in the brain and its place in the universe are unknown. A common assumption is that consciousness emerges from complex computation among brain neurons whose states are likened to fundamental units of information, or ‘bits’. However this assumption generates neither testable predictions nor a logical rationale for why computation per se should result in consciousness. Accordingly, prominent neuroscientists and philosophers resort to ‘panpsychism’, the notion that experiential ‘qualia’ are features of the universe, that consciousness is, in some sense, an intrinsic component of reality, akin to mass, spin or charge. But reduction to panpsychism confronts quantum physics.

In the mid 1990s, Roger Penrose and I began to suggest that consciousness depends on quantum processes in microtubules inside brain neurons. Microtubules are cylindrical lattice polymers of the protein tubulin, the brain’s most prevalent protein, which self-assemble to form and shape neurons and regulate synaptic plasticity. We hypothesized that microtubules, e.g. mixed polarity microtubule networks within dendrites and soma of cortical layer 5 pyramidal cells, could act as quantum computers whose basic ‘bit-like’ units were states of individual tubulins. Such tubulin states depended on orientation of oscillating intra-tubulin pi resonance dipoles which could exist in quantum superposition of alternative possible orientations simultaneously, ‘quantum bits’, or ‘qubits’. Further, we suggested the quantum vibrations in dendritic-somatic microtubules could interact across scale, be ‘orchestrated’ by synaptic inputs, memory, and resonance, and regulate synaptic plasticity and axonal firings.

The continuous Schrodinger evolution of each such quantum superposition in collections of microtubules were proposed to terminate in accordance with the specific Diosi-Penrose (‘DP’) scheme of objective reduction (‘OR’) of the quantum state. ‘Orchestrated’ OR (‘Orch OR’) events were taken to result in moments of full conscious awareness and/or choice (akin to Whitehead ‘occasions of experience’), and sequences of such moments to give rise to our familiar ‘stream of consciousness’. The DP form of OR is related to the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and space-time geometry, so Orch OR suggests a connection between brain microtubules and basic structure of the universe.

 

Though skeptically criticized, Orch OR generates testable neurobiological predictions, many of which have been validated, and none refuted. It is consistent with, and may underlie, neural-level theories including Global Workspace, Predictive Coding, Integrated Information Theory and Higher Order Thought. Orch OR is a rigorous scientific theory suggesting orchestrated quantum vibrations in microtubules inside neurons are the ground floor of a recursive brain hierarchy, and that consciousness is more akin to music than to computation.

ASSC 21 Preliminary Program

The 21st annual meeting of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness

Date: June 13-16, 2017

 

       Venue: Beijing International Convention Center - No. 8 Beichen Dong Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing

                preliminary program                

Preliminary Program

The 21st annual meeting of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness

Date: June 13-16, 2017

 

       Venue: Beijing International Convention Center - No. 8 Beichen Dong Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing

                                

ASSC 21 Abstract Submission

 


--------TALK AND POSTER SUBMISSIONS FOR ASSC 21 WILL CLOSE ON MARCH 31st--------

 

The annual ASSC conferences are intended to promote interdisciplinary dialogue in the scientific study of consciousness. ASSC members as well as non-members are encouraged to submit contributions that address current empirical and theoretical issues in the study of consciousness, from the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, medicine, philosophy, computer science, and cognitive ethology. ASSC21 will provide an excellent opportunity for the presentation of new empirical findings or novel theoretical perspectives in an atmosphere that will promote discussion and debate.


The program committee and organising committee invite submissions for Talk and Poster presentations on any topic relevant to the scientific study of consciousness. Neuroscientific, anthropological, clinical, evolutionary, psychological, philosophical, or computational perspectives are all welcome. The maximum time allocated to each talk is 20 minutes (including discussion). Speakers should aim to complete their talk in 15 minutes to allow 5 minutes for questions. Any person may present only one submission, but may be co-author on more than one. Submissions for both posters and talks will be accepted (please specify preference). All presenters must register for the conference (registration and payment can be made after acceptance notification has been received). 


We would, however, like you to be aware that there are a limited number of both talk sessions and poster space available. Talks and posters will be selected in preference of the presentations of greatest quality and relevance to the aims of the ASSC. Please note that we anticipate that we will be unable to accept all abstract submissions due to the limited time and space available. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this restriction may cause.


--------THERE WILL BE NO FURTHER EXTENTIONS FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION--------

                                                                  EARLY REGISTRATION WILL OPEN SOON !!


                                    [Submit Your Abstract Now]


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HOW TO SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT

1) Join ASSC:

  • STEP 1: Submit an online application (http://www.theassc.org/join_assc)
  • STEP 2: Pay for your membership
  • STEP 3: Your membership application will be reviewed by the membership committee to determine the appropriate membership category based on your information provided.
  • STEP 4: We will contact you to confirm your membership

NOTE: After your membership is confirmed, you need to log in as a member to submit an abstract.

 2) You will be asked to provide:

  • Title
  • Abstract of up to 250 words.
  • Presenting Author Name and Email
  • Author Name and affiliation for all authors (including presenting author).
  • Track (Neuroscience, Psychology, Philosophy, Clinical or other).

NOTE: Each presenting author may only submit one abstract for which they are presenting author.

3) After the details have been submitted you must click SUBMIT to submit your abstract!

Again, the maximum time allotted for each talk is 20 minutes (including discussion). Speakers should aim to complete their talk in 15 minutes to allow 5 minutes for questions and speaker transition time. High-definition video projectors will be available in every venue space allotted for talks. Provisions for audio output will also be available. Though in most cases a house laptop will be available, we urge speakers to bring their own computers. Although virtually any presentation format would probably be acceptable, we would strongly recommend the most commonly available formats: Powerpoint and Keynote

Please note that, due to the limited time and space available, we will not be able to accept all abstract submissions. We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this restriction may cause.

 

                                  [Submit Your Abstract Now] 

 

ABSTRACT JUDGING CRITERIA

 

In line with practices at some recent ASSC conferences, abstracts will be judged by the scientific committee "blind" to the list of contributing authors. The abstracts will be judged soley on the quality of the work presented in the abstract and its relevance to consciousness research. Submissions labeled as "POSTER ONLY" will simply be judged on a decision to accept or reject. The remaining submissions labeled as "TALK" will be judged on a decision to accept as "TALK" or "POSTER" or to reject ("blind" to the submitting authors indication that the abstract will be withdrawn if a talk is not awarded).

ASSC 21 Symposia

                             

SYMPOSIUM 1  Timing perceptual awareness: empirical challenges

 

Summary

 

The last ten years have been marked by a growing consensus amongst theories of visual awareness. According to this view, conscious perception specifically depends on the recruitment of late and sustained recurrent processing shared across cortical areas. However, a series of recent empirical findings challenges this view, and paradoxically demonstrates that i) visual awareness can either be specifically associated with early (< 250 ms) or late neural responses (> 250 ms), and that ii) invisible stimuli can trigger long-lasting neural processes. To understand how these conflicting results fit under a common functional architecture, this symposium will review four independent lines of research focusing on temporally-resolved neuroimaging techniques (EEG, MEG and ECoG) and computational modelling. Each speaker will discuss how the differences in experimental protocols (threshold stimulation, backward masking, attentional blink, inattentional blindness and retrospective cueing, in different sensory modalities) may account for the observed differences in the locus and dynamics of conscious and unconscious processes, and suggest a series of precisions or revisions of theories of visual awareness. By modelling the dynamics of conscious and unconscious neural processes, the present symposium will draw the new challenges of visual awareness research.

 

Chair: Jean-Rémi King 

 

Talk 1:  Disentangling early sensory processing and conscious access when perception is reported and when it remains private

Claire Sergent, INSERM, ICM Research Center; Institut du Cerveau et de la Moëlle épinière

  

Talk 2: Discrete and continuous mechanisms of temporal selection in rapid visual streams

 Sébastien Marti, Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, CEA DSV/I2BM, INSERM, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, NeuroSpin center


Talk 3: Is there a fixed time for the Neural Correlate of Consciousness?  

Lucia Melloni, Department of Neurophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research; Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, New York University 

  

Talk 4: Brain mechanisms underlying the brief maintenance of seen and unseen sensory information

Jean-Rémi King, New York University; Frankfurt institute for Advanced Studies 

 

 

SYMPOSIUM 2  Conscious and unconscious processes in decision-making

 

Summary 

 

For many decades the study of decision-making has been a hot topic in psychology, cognitive neuroscience and philosophy. Specifically, signal-detection theory (SDT) and so-called sequential sampling models have proven to be powerful ways of describing the decision process. Recently, it has been suggested that the sense of ‘willing’ that arises prior to an action or even consciousness can be seen as ‘a decision to engage in a certain way’. Such a perspective implies that similar principles are underlying conscious vs. unconscious decision-making. In contrast, others have argued that unconscious and conscious decision processes emerge from different mechanisms in the brain.

In this symposium we will discuss how current advancements in the study of decision-making contribute to our understanding of consciousness and volition. Critically, decision-making is a complex process that engages multiple levels of description, each of which may involve both conscious and unconscious mechanisms. Therefore, we will shed light on the role and necessity of consciousness in decision-making from various cognitive neuroscientific angles. Here, we will discuss (1) brain mechanisms underlying objective and subjective freedom of choice in decision-making, (2) the influence of random fluctuations in the sensory context and in brain activity may on decision-making, (3) how wakefulness affects distinct processes of cognition of awareness and metacognition, (4) how manipulations of awareness of feedback influences our decision process, and (4) what kind of processes govern decision-making and the monitoring of our decision process.

To bring this debate to the surface “what is the role of conscious and unconscious processes in decision making”, we aim to integrate different aspects of perceptual consciousness, executive decisions, unconscious influences, wakefulness, free will and embodied cognition into a wide view of what makes us make up our minds. 

 

Chair: Martijn E. Wokke 

   

TALK 1: Entrainment of finger tapping to unperceived auditory regularities

Aaron Schurger, INSERM Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, Neurospin Research Center, CEA-Saclay 

 

TALK 2: Hazy decisions in the mist of consciousness: wakefulness differentially modulates conscious access and metacognition

Tristan Bekinschtein, Consciousness and Cognition Lab, Dep. of Psychology, University of Cambridge; Institute for Cognitive Neurology, Favaloro University 

   

TALK 3:  The impact of feedback awareness on reward-based learning and choice perseveration: computational and electrophysiological underpinnings 

Simon van Gaal, University of Amsterdam, Dept. of Psychology; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Radboud University Nijmegen

 

TALK 4Influence of sensory noise on endogenous decisions and subjective freedom of choice 

Lucie Charles, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL 

 

TALK 5:  Differential information supports first- and second-order decisions

Martijn E. Wokke, Department of Psychology, The City University of New York; Consciousness, Cognition and Computation Group, Université Libre de Bruxelles 

  

 

SYMPOSIUM 3  Creating consciousness on demand: how the imagination creates visual consciousness 

  

Summary 

 

Hallucinations, mental imagery, synaesthesia and many illusions can all create a wakeful conscious experience without a corresponding stimulus or sensory stimulation: an internal conscious experience. Historically research into such dimensions of consciousness has suffered criticism and lacked scientific traction due to the methodological constraints caused by the inherent private nature of such experiences. Accordingly, empirical consciousness research over the past 15 years has tended to focus on the inverse situation: neural stimulation and processing without consciousness awareness (Binocular rivalry, masking, continuous flash suppression).

However, recently objective research methods have been introduced that allow a more direct investigation into the mechanisms and neural substrates of consciousness without a direct external cause. Concurrently, developments in the field of machine learning have introduced powerful new concepts for constructing explicitly quantitative and empirically testable theories about the nature of such conscious experiences and their relationship to externally triggered perception. This allows the formulation of normative theories about the computational role of internally generated representations, and mechanistic theories about the generating process.

Here, four researchers will present new empirical and theoretical accounts of internal visual consciousness, (mental imagery) without a stimulus. First, Joel Pearson will talk about a mechanism that controls the sensory strength of mental imagery and how to measure and manipulate it. Second, Yasuyuki Kamitani will present exciting new results on ongoing efforts to decode mental imagery and dreams from human brain activity. Third, Roger Koenig-Robert will talk about new results decoding the content of visual thoughts before they are made. Finally, Thomas Naselaris will present an overview of recent results on mental imagery in the fMRI literature, and a new theoretical perspective on mental imagery from the vantage point of predictive coding theory.

Collectively, these talks will provide the audience with an up-to-date and multi-perspective overview of current research on consciousness without a stimulus, providing evidence for and insight into this rapidly emerging new dimension of consciousness research. 

 

Chairs: Joel Pearson and Thomas Nasalaris     

  

TALK 1:  Mind Control: Measuring and manipulating the strength of the visual imagery 

Joel Pearson, Department of Psychology, The University of New South Wales 

 

TALK 2: Brain decoding of perception, imagery, and dreaming

Yukiyasu Kamitani, Kyoto University and ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories 

 

TALK 3: Decoding the nonconscious dynamics of thought generation 

 Roger Koenig-Robert, Department of Psychology, The University of New South Wales 

 

TALK 4: A predictive coding account of visual mental imagery

Thomas Naselaris, Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina 

  

   

SYMPOSIUM 4  Feelings of space? Somatosensory spatial perception and neurophenomenology of bodily awareness" 

 

 Summary

 

Somatosensation is a topic of resurgent interest within the scientific study of consciousness.  First, the neuroanatomical organization of the somatosensory system into different classes of receptors, afferent fibres, and cortical targets, offers a ready model for investigating concepts of sensory quality and modality. Second, several specific aspects of somatosensory experience offer important challenges for consciousness research. One of these is the puzzling nature of experience of somatosensory space, and this forms the focus of the present symposium. Somatosensory channels have poorer spatial acuity, and lower informational capacity than, say, the visual system.  As a result, experience of somatosensory locations and extents is often impoverished or absent – leading some to propose that somatosensation is not a spatial sense at all. Further, many somatosensory systems (though not all) yield a conscious experience only when the skin contacts an object. This gives sparse sampling of the external world compared to other senses. In this symposium, we debate these and other problems in understanding somatosensory consciousness.  Speakers from philosophy, psychology and neuroscience represent contrasting points of view on the experience of space though somatosensation.  Importantly, our speakers also cover a range of somatosensory modalities, including touch, pain and proprioception. We also have a range of career stages represented. We anticipate useful contrast between views focusing on afferent signals from the body, and views focusing on centrally-generated, multisensory phenomenologies of object perception. We see this symposium as putting somatosensory space back where it belongs on the scientific map of consciousness.

 

Chairs: Patrick Haggard and Francesca Fardo

 

Talk 1: Spatial encoding of the thermal-grill illusion of pain

Francesca Fardo, Danish Pain Research Centre, Aarhus University 

 

Talk 2: The spatial character of distal touch

Matthew Fulkerson, Department of Philosophy, UC San Diego

 

Talk 3: Skin-space: the receptor array as basis for spatial perception

Patrick Haggard, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London

 

Talk 4: Somatosensory fields and Perceptual Objects

Mike Martin, Department of Philosophy, University College London 

 


SYMPOSIUM 5  Interoceptive Inference: From Bodily Signals to Conscious Experience 

  

Summary 

 

The idea of bodily sensations contributing to cognition and consciousness is not new 1 and influential proposals linking interoception to conscious states have been gathering momentum now since early 2000s (e.g., 2, 3). It is only recently, however, that researchers have started to investigate the idea that the brain may perceive and regulate bodily states to the same inferential (Bayesian) principles that have been applied to exteroceptive modalities like vision and audition. The framework of “interoceptive inference” provides a natural link between subjective states relevant to conscious selfhood and physiological signals from the body. Since its initial proposal 4, this field has seen a surge in conceptual developments [see 5-12 for a sample; also see a special issue in Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 13]. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of concrete theoretical predictions and empirical tests relevant to conscious perception and selfhood. 

  

This symposium will address these challenges with four closely linked interdisciplinary talks covering both theoretical and empirical approaches, encompassing computational neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, clinical application, and philosophy. First, Seth will introduce and update the theoretical framework of interoceptive inference, explaining how it is related to selfhood, emotion, and perception, with a new emphasis on allostatic control. Second, Petzschner will present experiments that provide the first evidence for interoceptive prediction errors with respect to heartbeats, using a combination of EEG, behavior and computational modelling. Third, Pezzulo will present the connections between an "interoceptive schema" and a "body schema”, their relevance for adaptive action, and their neural correlates. Next, Gu will present an application of the interoceptive inference framework to subjective states in clinical populations such as drug craving. Lastly, the audience will have the opportunity to exchange thoughts with the speakers. By end of this symposium, we hope to gain new insights into the relevance of interoceptive inference to consciousness science, and more important, to galvanize the conference’s interest in this rapidly emerging topic. 

 

Chairs:  Xiaosi Gu  and  Anil K. Seth 
  

Talk 1: Being a beast machine 

Anil K. Seth, Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex  

  

Talk 2: Predictive Coding of Heartbeats 

Frederike Petzschner, Translational Neuromodeling Unit, ETH & University of Zurich 

  

Talk 3: In search of an "interoceptive schema": an active inference perspective 

Giovanni Pezzulo, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies National Research Council   

  

Talk 4: A Bayesian Observer Model of Drug Craving 

 

Xiaosi Gu, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences & Computational Psychiatry Unit, The University of Texas at Dallas 

ASSC 21

THE 21st ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ASSC WILL BE HELD IN BEIJING, CHINA, JUNE 13th-16th, 2017

 

Venue: Beijing International Convention Center - No. 8 Beichen Dong Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing

 

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION IS NOW OPEN AND WILL CLOSE ON 31st MARCH

 

There will be no further extentions for abstract submission


 

 

 

LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Sheng He (chair)

Xiaolan Fu (co-chair)

Qiufang Fu (co-chair)

Fang Fang

Yi Jiang

Wu Li

Xun Liu

Peng Zhang

Secretaries: Nan Guo, Linan Shi, Xin Zhou


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

  • Catherine Tallon-Baudry (Ecole Normale Superieure, France)
  • David Leopold (National Institute of Mental Health, USA)
  • Adrian Owen (The Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, Canada)
  • Mu-Ming Poo (Institute of Neuroscience, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)
  • Joelle Proust (Institut Jean-Nicod, France)
  • Rufin VanRullen (Universite Paul Sabatier, France)

 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Sheng He (Chair, China), Yi Jiang (Co-chair, China), Olivia Carter (Australia), Axel Cleeremans (Belgium), Zoltan Dienes (UK), Paula Droege (USA), Steve Fleming (UK), Ryota Kanai (UK), Thomas K. Metzinger (Germany), Anil Seth (UK), Catherine Tallon-Baudry (France), Frank Tong (USA), Peter U. Tse (USA), Brigitte Röder (Germany), Michał Wierzchoń (Poland)

ASSC 20 Registration

 Early Registration fees US$  (Until May 14th)Late Registration fees US$ (After May 14th)
ASSC20 MEETING (June 15th-18th)
   
Meeting Registration - ASSC Student Member€140€190
Meeting Registration - ASSC Member 
€250€280
Meeting Registration - Non-member 
€300€350

 



Tutorials (June 14th, optional)
€50€50
  



                  ----- CONFERENCE REGISTRATION INSTRUCTIONS -----

                                      

Conference Registration for STUDENT MEMBERS

Note if you have only just applied for membership you will need to wait a few days for your membership to be processed. You will recieve an email notification once your login account has been created.

  • 1) LOGIN: To access the student member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password".  If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.

  • 2) [Click here to proceed to STUDENT MEMBER registration]


Conference Registration for MEMBERS

Note if you have only just applied for membership you will need to wait a few days for your membership to be processed. You will recieve an email notification once your login account has been created.

  • 1) LOGIN To access the member conference price you will first need to login.  If you are not logged in, you will see a login window in the top right corner of this page (if you are logged in you should see "My account" & "log out" in that location). Your username will be the email address you provided with your membership registration. If your email does not work, try your full name (e.g. William James). If you are unsure of your password, select "request new password". If you are having problems loging in please contact the ASSC secretary.


Conference Registration for NON-MEMBERS

Note:  If you are not currently a member, but would like to take advantage of the member's discount, please go to our member registration page http://www.theassc.org/join_assc  You will need to allow a few days for the membership to be processed and will be notified once your login account has been created.              

Membership Payment - Students

Thank you for completing the registration form. Please make a payment to complete the registration process:

Student Member
1 Year$35
2 Years$60

 

Transactions processed through PayPal:

Why use PayPal? The ASSC has contracted with PayPal, an online payment service that provides instant, secure online payments. For more information about PayPal, you can visit their website at www.paypal.com. With PayPal you can pay by credit card or debit card. We use Paypal to provide a secure web based system to process credit card/debit card information. You do not need to join Paypal to use this service. For the purposes of this transaction no credit-card/debit-card information is stored by either Paypal or ourselves. If you have problems paying via Paypal please contact the ASSC secretary.

Neuroscience of Consciousness

We are delighted to announce Neuroscience of Consciousness, published by Oxford University Press, as the official journal of ASSC.

Neuroscience of Consciousness is an open access journal for a dynamic, inter-disciplinary community of researchers interested in the neuroscience of consciousness. It covers neuroscience, psychology and philosophy, offers high quality and constructive peer review and rapid decision and publication times.

ASSC members are eligible for a 20% discount on Article Processing charges and a 25% discount on books from Oxford University Press.

ASSC After Party

ASSC After Party

 

Friday, July 10th, 7:30pm onwards


Les Caractères, 25 Rue des Grands Augustins, 75006 Paris

about 10 minutes walk from the ASSC venue





Meet up with the ASSC participants for one last drink in the typically ‘Quartier Latin’-ish cellar of the bar Les Caractères.


The bar will be fully booked for the ASSC participants (capacity : 200 persons).


Drinks and planches will be available :

 

  • glass of wine : 3-5€

  • pint of beer : 5-7€ (3-5€ until 8:00pm)

  • cheese and charcuterie for 2 persons : 10€

Poor Man's Pique-nique

 

 

 

Thursday, July 9th, 7:00pm onwards


Pont des Arts

about 10 minutes walk from the ASSC venue





For those who cannot make it to the Gala Dinner…

Let’s act like genuine Parisians, and have cheese & wine on the lovely Pont des Arts !


Please note that this is an informal gathering.

Everyone is kindly invited to bring their own food and drinks, a list of supermarkets will be provided.

 

Alternatively, a list of affordable bars and restaurants in the Saint-Germain-des-Prés district will be provided.

ASSC Student Social

ASSC Student Social

 

 

Wednesday, July 8th, 8:00pm onwards


L’Autobus Impérial, 14 Rue Mondétour, 75001 Paris

Metro Etienne Marcel

15 minutes from the ASSC venue with metro 4





Cocktail party with finger food and drinks offered by the ASSC, for both the students and the non-students.

Classical French bistrot upstairs, club downstairs.

 


Career Panel

 

 

Thursday, July 9th, 12:30am - 1:30pm


ASSC venue, 45 rue des Saints-Pères, 75006 Paris





Two young researchers & an entrepreneur will briefly present their early career path, followed by a Question & Answer session.

 

Sandwiches will be offered by the ASSC.

 

  • Sarah Garfinkel
    PhD (cognitive psychology) : University of Sussex, UK
    Postdoc : University of Michigan, USA
    Research Fellow : Brighton & Sussex Medical School / University of Sussex, UK

 

  • Tristan Bekinschtein
    PhD (neuroscience) : University of Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Postdoc : Inserm-CEA cognitive neuroimaging unit, Paris, France
    Research Fellow : University of Cambridge, UK

 

  • Claire Sergent
    PhD (neuroscience) : Inserm-CEA cognitive neuroimaging unit (unit cog), Orsay, France
    Postdoc : University College London, UK
    Postdoc : ICM (Institut du cerveau et de la Moelle Epinière), Paris, France
    Assistant Professor : Université Paris Descartes, France
  •  

Local information

 

 

1) TRAVEL TO AND FROM THE AIRPORTS 

Public transport:

Orly Airport (ORY) is located 14 kilometres sout-east of Paris. Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport (CDG) is located 27 kilometers north-east of the capital. A wide range of public transport options are available to travel to and from the airports.

Find the best way to travel between Paris and Orly Airport or Roissy charles de Gaulle Airport here: 

-http://www.ratp.fr/en/ratp/r_61596/access-to-airports/ 

-http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/en/passengers/access

 

Taxis:

Paris-Charles De Gaulle by taxi: http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/en/passengers/access/paris-charles-de-gaulle/taxi/paris-cdg-taxi

Paris-Orly by taxi: http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/en/passengers/access/paris-orly/taxi/taxi

 

Car rental:

Car rental at Paris-Orly and Paris Charles-De-Gaulle: http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/en/passengers/access/car-rental

 

2) PARIS TRANSPORTATION

 

Paris public transportation:

- Tickets: http://www.ratp.fr/en/ratp/r_61584/tickets/

- How to use the Paris Public Transportation:

A simple guide to the rules of the Paris metro and RER: http://www.ratp.fr/en/upload/docs/application/pdf/2014-10/mode_emploi_t.pdf 

- Maps: http://www.ratp.fr/en/ratp/c_20559/consultez-l-ensemble-des-plans/

Metro: http://www.ratp.fr/informer/pdf/orienter/f_plan.php?fm=pdf&loc=reseaux&nompdf=metro

 

Taxis:

- Taxis G7:

Book a taxi: +33 (0) 1 41 27 66 99
Book on line: http://www.taxisg7.com/?tg7=h06cnluu8evrs1vcgv13b8ldb1

- Les Taxis Bleus: 

Reservation: +33 (0) 1 49 36 10 10
https://www.taxis-bleus.com/accueil/index.php

- Alpha Taxis:

Reservation: + 33 (0) 1 45 85 85 85
http://www.alphataxis.fr

- Wecab: Paris Taxi Airport

https://www.wecab.com/en

 

Car rental:

AVIS: http://www.avis.fr/Locationvoiture/Europe/France/Paris

Hertz: https://www.hertz.fr/p/location-de-voiture/france/paris/?hertzid=27673&gclid=CjwKEAiAmaanBRCIt4364e2d6yUSJAA9VXTUCeqvvifVyHN_uGX95M2gDxj0ZV-QablBhacHESPjdhoCINbw_wcB

Europcar: https://www.europcar.fr/agences/france/paris

 

3) LOCAL INFORMATION 

Paris tourist office: http://en.parisinfo.com

Paris.fr: http://www.paris.fr/english

Mentor lunch

 

Wednesday, July 8th, 12:30am - 2:00pm


Venue : CROUS Mabillon, 3 Rue Mabillon, 75006 Paris. About 10 minutes walk from the ASSC venue





The Mentor Lunch is an opportunity for students to have career advice and discuss particular research questions with their chosen mentor, in groups of up to four students.

A catered lunch will be offered by the ASSC.

 

Mentors :

  • Marisa Carrasco

  • Chris Frith

  • Alison Gopnik

  • Sharon Thompson-Schill

  • Giandomenico Iannetti

  • Hal Blumenfeld

  • Olaf Blanke

  • Tyler Burge

  • Tim Bayne

  • Uriah Kriegel


Registration before May 31st - mariagiovannacorrado@gmail.com

 

How to get there?

Crous Mabillon is about 10 minutes walk from the conference center

mentor lunch walk

ASSC After Party

More information coming soon

ASSC Social

More information coming soon

Welcome reception

 

More information coming soon

 

Sponsored by


ASSC19 Visa Information

Picto douane VISA INFORMATION

 

All foreign nationals wanting to come to France must be able to submit statutory documentary evidence at the border for the reasons for their stay, their means of support and accommodation arrangements. As a rule, unless you are exempt, you are required to have a visa. It must be applied for from the relevant French embassy or consulate in the applicant’s country of residence.


A certain number of nationalities are exempt from the short-stay visa requirement.


For short stays (less than 90 days), European regulations specify the list of countries whose nationals are exempt from visa requirement to enter the Schengen Area.


Exempt from visa requirement for France’s territory in Europe are :

-  citizens of the EU, the EEA and Switzerland ;
-  nationals of the following countries, whatever the reason for their stay: Albania *, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Bosnia and Herzegovina *, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Israel, Malaysia, Mauritius, Monaco, Nicaragua , New Zealand, Panama, Paraguay, Saint Kitts and Nevis, San Marino, Holy See, Seychelles, Taiwan (passport bearing identity card number), Uruguay, Montenegro*, FYROM* and Serbia* ;
*bearers of biometric passports only


For more information regarding Visa Information, please visit the official french gouvernemental website : click here

 

Picto newsLETTER OF INVITATION

 

After identifying that a visa is needed, the Local Organizing Committee can provide you an Invitation letter. To request a Letter of Invitation please send your request to congresassc19@gmail.com and provide the following informations : First Name, Last Name (as indicated on your passport) and full postal address.

ASSC 19 - Registration - Non Members - Early

INSTRUCTIONS

1) Select each of the items that you would like below & press "ADD TO CART." This will automatically load the paypal page showing your selection.

2) If you would like to add more items select "CONTINUE SHOPPING" and add another item.

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4) If the name you provide with the payment details is different to the name you would like on your name tag (or is listed with your abstract) please notify congresassc19@ens.fr AFTER you have completed your payment so that your payment/registration details can be appropriately recorded.

PLEASE NOTE:

You do not need a PayPal account to make a payment: simply follow the instructions to pay with or without an account.

You will need to add each item to your cart separately so do not proceed to payment until ALL items are listed.


ASSC 19 Conference (July 7th-10th) Registration Fees for Non-Members

Registration - 500 €:

First Name:  

Last Name:  

Affiliation:  

These informations will appear on your badge. Please make sure the details are correct before adding to Cart!

Payments received after June 12th will not be refundable. Refunds made prior to June 12th will be subject to a 15% processing fee.

 


Optional Morning Tutorials (9:00am-12:00pm, July 7th) - 50€ each (you can only select 1 morning and/or 1 afternoon tutorial):

TUTORIAL M1 - 9:00AM: Experimental Hypnosis Research
Devin B. Terhune


TUTORIAL M2 - 9:00AM:
 Novel Advances in Disorders of Consciousness
Jacobo D. Sitt


TUTORIAL M3 - 9:00
AM: Phenomenal Concepts
Pär Sundström


TUTORIAL M4 - 9:00
AM: Neural Mechanism of Self-Consciousness
Olafe Blanke & Andrea Serino


Optional Afternoon Tutorials (1:00pm-4:00pm, July 7th)- 50€ each (you can only select 1 morning and/or 1 afternoon tutorial):

TUTORIAL A1 - 1:00PM: The Metacognitive Approach to Studying Consciousness 
Hakwan Lau 


TUTORIAL A2 - 1:00PM:
 Using Bayes to Interpret Non-Significant Results
Zoltan Dienes


TUTORIAL A3 - 1:00PM:
 The Body in the Mind: Interoception and Consciousness
Sarah N. Garfinkel


TUTORIAL A4 - 1:00PM:
 Non-Sensory Phenomenology
Uriah Kriegel 


Optional Gala Dinner (July 9th) 


View your shopping cart:


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If you are having trouble check that you are not using an older browser. Difficulties have also been experienced when login in remotely through a VPN connection

Inquiries: If you are having difficulties please contact congresassc19@ens.fr

ASSC 19 - Registration - ASSC Members - Early

INSTRUCTIONS

1) Select each of the items that you would like below & press "ADD TO CART." This will automatically load the paypal page showing your selection.

2) If you would like to add more items select "CONTINUE SHOPPING" and add another item.

3) Once you all of your items have been selected all of your items select "CHECKOUT" if you would like to pay with a credit card or "CHECKOUT WITH PAYPAL" if you would like to use a paypal account

4) If the name you provide with the payment details is different to the name you would like on your name tag (or is listed with your abstract) please notify congresassc19@ens.fr AFTER you have completed your payment so that your payment/registration details can be appropriately recorded.

PLEASE NOTE:

You do not need a PayPal account to make a payment: simply follow the instructions to pay with or without an account.

You will need to add each item to your cart separately so do not proceed to payment until ALL items are listed.


ASSC 19 Conference (July 7th-10th) Registration Fees for Members

Registration - 500 €:

First Name:  

Last Name:  

Affiliation:  

These informations will appear on your badge. Please make sure the details are correct before adding to Cart!

Payments received after June 12th will not be refundable. Refunds made prior to June 12th will be subject to a 15% processing fee.


Optional Morning Tutorials (9:00am-12:00pm, July 7th) - 50€ each (you can only select 1 morning and/or 1 afternoon tutorial):

TUTORIAL M1 - 9:00AM: Experimental Hypnosis Research
Devin B. Terhune


TUTORIAL M2 - 9:00AM:
 Novel Advances in Disorders of Consciousness
Jacobo D. Sitt


TUTORIAL M3 - 9:00
AM: Phenomenal Concepts
Pär Sundström


TUTORIAL M4 - 9:00
AM: Neural Mechanism of Self-Consciousness
Olafe Blanke & Andrea Serino


Optional Afternoon Tutorials (1:00pm-4:00pm, July 7th)- 50€ each (you can only select 1 morning and/or 1 afternoon tutorial):

TUTORIAL A1 - 1:00PM: The Metacognitive Approach to Studying Consciousness 
Hakwan Lau 


TUTORIAL A2 - 1:00PM:
 Using Bayes to Interpret Non-Significant Results
Zoltan Dienes


TUTORIAL A3 - 1:00PM:
 The Body in the Mind: Interoception and Consciousness
Sarah N. Garfinkel


TUTORIAL A4 - 1:00PM:
 Non-Sensory Phenomenology
Uriah Kriegel 


Optional Gala Dinner (July 9th) 


View your shopping cart:


System requirements: The PayPal link has been successfully tested using Firefox 3.6 (Mac), Safari 4.0.4 (Mac) Chrome 5 (Mac), Firefox 3.5.8 (PC), IE 7 (PC)

If you are having trouble check that you are not using an older browser. Difficulties have also been experienced when login in remotely through a VPN connection

Inquiries: If you are having difficulties please contact congresassc19@ens.fr