ASSC 7 Program

Friday, May 30, 2003:

8:00 am:

Registration (Auditorium)

9:30 am - 12:30 pm:

Morning Workshops

12:30 pm - 14:00 pm:

Lunch

14:00 pm - 17:00 pm:

Afternoon Workshops

17:00 pm - 18:00 pm:

Presidential Address by Ned Block (Auditorium)

Saturday, May 31, 2003:

8:00 am:

Registration (Auditorium)

8:30 am - 9:30 am:

Plenary Talk: (Auditorium)
"High Resolution EEG brings us another step closer to the NCC ?" by Walter Freeman, University of California at Berkeley

9:30 am - 9:55 am:

Coffee Break

9:55 am - 12:25 pm:

Plenary Symposium 1 (Auditorium)
Global Workspace Theory:

"Recent Brain Evidence supports the basic Global Workspace" by Bernard J. Baars, The Neurosciences Institute, San Diego

"Testable Hypotheses from the IDA model of Global Workspace Theory" by Stan Franklin, The University of Memphis

"Automaticity Revisited in the light of the Global Workspace Hypothesis" by Lionel Naccache, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, France

12:25 pm - 13:35 pm:

Lunch

13:35 pm - 15:35 pm:

Concurrent Sessions:
CS 1.1 Models & Memory (
Psychology 204)

"The Problem of Subjectivity in Global Workspace Theory" by Norman D. Cook, Kansai University, Takatsuki, Osaka, Japan

"Memory Conjunction and the Unity of Consciousness" by Sharon L. Hannigan, St. Lawrence University and Paula Droege, Penn State University

"A Neural Computational Model of Cognition and Consciousness" by Garry Briscoe, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

"Modeling Memory Systems with Global Workspace Theory" by Uma Ramamurthy, St Jude Children's Research Hospital & The Univeristy of Memphis; Sidney K. D'Mello, The University of Memphis, and Stan Franklin, The University of Memphis

CS 1.2 Imaging Studies and Anesthesia (Psychology 206)

"Chess Experts require less brain activity than non-Experts in a recognition task with Chess stimuli" by Guillermo Campitelli, Fernand Gobet and Amand Parker, University of Nottingham

"Tracking an Illusion: Feedback Activation in V1 during apparent-motion perception" by Axel Kohler, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Germany; Alexander T. Sack, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitat, Germany, and Nikolaus Kriegeskorte, Universiteit Maastricht, The Netherlands

"Transient Zombie-like states of Limbic Temporal Lobe Epilepsy" by Thomas Reid Henry, Emory University

"Halothane maximally augments Visual Event-Related Gamma Oscillations when rats lose Consciousness" by A. G. Hudetz, Medical College of Wisconsin; O. A. Imas, Marquette University; J.D. Wood, Medical College of Wisconsin, and K. M. Ropella, Marquette University

CS 1.3 Miscellaneous (Dunn Hall 249)

"How is Language represented ?" by David Dufty, The University of Memphis

"The Placebo Response: Implications for Causal Efficacy of Consciousness" by Yoshio Nakamura, C. Richard Chapman, University of Utah

"What is it like to be an Artificial Agent?" by Matthias Scheutz, University of Notre Dame

"Improving the Explanatory Value of Neuroscientific Models of Consciousness" by Ilya Farber, George Washington University

15:35 pm - 16:00 pm:

Tea

16:00 pm - 18:30 pm:

Plenary Symposium 2 (Auditorium)
Binocular Rivalry and the NCC:

"Binocular Rivalry and the Illusion of Monocular Vision" by David Leopold, Max Plank Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tubingen

"Binocular Rivalry and Perceptual Awareness in Human Primary Visual Cortex" by Frank Tong, Princeton University

"What does Binocular Rivalry teach us about Consciousness?" by Alva Noe, University of California, Santa Cruz

19:00 pm - 21:00 pm:

Poster Session/Conference Reception (Fogelman)

Sunday, June 1, 2003:

8:00 am:

Registration (Auditorium)

8:30 am - 9:30 am:

Plenary Talk: (Auditorium)
"The Fantasy of a First-Person Science of Consciousness"
by Daniel C. Dennett, Center for Cognitive Studies

9:30 am - 9:55 am:

Coffee Break

9:55 am - 12:25 pm:

Plenary Symposium 3 (Auditorium)
Feedback and Re-Entrant Processes in Consciousness:

"Why Visual Attention and Awareness are different" by Victor A.F. Lamme, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Title to be Announced by Alvaro Pascual-Leone, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School

"Two-way Pathways in the Brain: What are they for ?" by Vince Di Lollo, University of British Columbia, Vancouver

12:25 pm - 13:35 pm:

Lunch

13:35 pm - 15:35 pm:

Concurrent Sessions:
CS 2.1 Binocular Rivalry/Neural Correlates (
Psychology 204)

"Variability and Adaptability of the Visual System in Binocular Rivalry" by Fumihiko Taya, Osaka University & Sony Computer Science Laboratories and Ken Mogi, Sony Computer Science Laboratories

"Differential Amygdala but not extrastriate activity is evidence for Categorization of objects not seen during Binocular Rivalry" by Brian Pasley and Robert Schultz, Yale Child Study Center

"Re-Entrant Loops, Neural Codes and Conscious Awareness" by Peter Cariani, Harvard Medical School

"Can Neural Darwinism explain Consciousness? An Empirical Evaluation" by Anil K. Seth and Bernard J. Baars, The Neurosciences Institute

CS 2.2 Phenomenology (Psychology 206)

"Phenomenology ain't just in the head" by Justin C. Fisher, University of Arizona

"Either Ho or Fo: A False Dichotomy" by Robert W. Lurz, Brooklyn College, CUNY

"Closing the gap on pain" by Thomas Polger, University of Cincinnati, and Kenneth Sufka, University of Mississippi

"Reportability and the Single Index Challenge" by Dan Ryder, Indiana University, and Zena Ryder, UNC Chapel Hill

CS 2.3 Perception (Dunn Hall 249)

"Studies of the Dichoptic Standing Wave of Invisibility: Implications for Visual Awareness" by Stephen L. Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde, University College, London

"Perception Training of the Visual Potentialities" by Sharipov Amir and Gafurova Zulfia, Russian Eye and Plastic Surgery Center

"Changes in Shape are confunded with changes in Intensity in early Visual Neurons" by Susana Martinez-Conde, Stephen L. Macknik, and Xoana G. Troncoso, University College, London

"Illusory Body Image induced by Double Touch in fingers" by Takayasu Sekine, Tokyo Institute of Technology & Sony Computer Science Laboratories, and Ken Mogi, Sony Computer Science Laboratories

15:35 pm - 16:00 pm:

Tea

16:00 pm - 18:30 pm:

Plenary Symposium 4 (Auditorium)
Computational Models of Consciousness:

"What kind of Virtual Machine is capable of Human Consciousness?" by Aaron Sloman, The University of Birmingham

"Is it Conscious? A question of Mechanism" by Igor Aleksander, Imperial College, London

"The Search for the Computational Correlates of Consciousness" by Axel Cleeremans, Universite Libre de Bruxelles

19:00 pm - 21:00 pm:

Southern Gourmet Banquet (Holiday Inn)

Monday, June 2, 2003:

8:30 am - 9:30 am:

Plenary Talk:  (Auditorium)
"A framework for Consciousness"
by Christof Koch, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

9:30 am - 9:55 am:

Coffee Break

9:55 am - 12:25 pm:

Plenary Symposium 5 (Auditorium)
Animal Consciousness:

"Bonobo Beliefs and Desires: An Inference for non-Human Consciousness" by Sue Savage-Rumbaugh and Bill Fields, Georgia State University, Atlanta

"Cultivating Consciousness: Chimpanzees and the Impact of Enculturation" by Sarah T. Boysen, Ohio State University, Columbus

"Why the question of Animal Consciousness might not matter very much" by Peter Carruthers, University of Maryland, College Park

12:25 pm - 13:35 pm:

Lunch

13:35 pm - 15:35 pm:

Concurrent Sessions:
CS 3.1 Voluntary Action/Metacognition (
Psychology 204)

"Single-Trial Event-related Potentials and their relation to Consciousness" by Rodrigo Quian Quiroga, California Institute of Technology

"On the nature of Forced and Spontaneous Choices" by Ayako Onzo, Tokyo Institute of Technology & Sony Computer Science Laboratories, and Ken Mogi, Sony Computer Science Laboratories

"Biased Metacognitive Measurement of Implicit Knowledge" by Matt Twyman, University of York, and Zoltan Dienes, University of Sussex

"The Role of Voluntary Attention in Chromatic Infusion of Afterimages" by Liang Lou, Grand Valley State University

CS 3.2 Animal Consciousness (Psychology 206)

"Carruthers on Animal Consciousness and the Dispositional HOT Theory" by Rocco J. Gennaro, Indiana State University

"Equine and Elephantine Epistemology" by Dr. M. Kiley-Worthington, University of Cambridge & Eco Research Center

"The Self-Recognition Emotion Stroop Task: A Novel Method for quantitatively assessing Self-Recognition" by Steve Joordens, Linda Scuccimarri, and Carol Borlido, Univerity of Toronto at Scarborough

"The Mind in the Mirror: Self-Awareness, Self-Recognition, and the Mark Test" by Roblin R. Meeks, City University of New York Graduate Center

CS 3.3 Emotions and Attention (Dunn Hall 249)

"Awareness of Emotional 'Gut Feelings': A Comparison of Long-term Meditators and non-Meditators using a Visual Masking Paradigm" by Lisbeth Nielsen, University of Arizona & Stanford University, and Alfred W. Kaszniak, University of Arizona

"Dissociating Phenomenal and Representational Aspects of Mental Imaging" by Bill Faw, Brewton-Parker College

"Ambivalent Emotions and the Structure of Mental States capable of becoming Conscious" by Maxim I. Stamenov, Germany

"Behavioral and Physiological Consequences of Shifts in Conscious Awareness" by Jonathan M. Smallwood, Glasgow Caledonian University

15:35 pm - 16:00 pm:

Tea

16:00 pm - 17:00 pm:

Closing Talk (Auditorium)
"Blindsight and Plasticity" by Petra Stoerig, Princeton University