ASSC 18 - Program

                                    ------ ASSC 18 Final Program ------

 

To download a PDF of the draft program including ABSTRACTS [Click Here]

 

 

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS: The Hard Problem of Consciousness: 300 Years on.

David Chalmers

Australian National University and New York University


KEYNOTE 1: Binocular Rivalry and Visual Awareness

Sheng He

University of Minnesota, USA and Chinese Academy of Sciences 

 

KEYNOTE 2: Are Consciousness and Attention Dissociable? 

Jesse Prinz  

City University of New York, USA 

 

KEYNOTE 3: The Neurophysiology of the Unconscious Brain under General Anesthesia. 

Emery Brown

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA 

 

KEYNOTE 4: Spatial awareness and its disorders

Melanie Wilke

University Medical Centre Goettingen, Germany 

 

SPECIAL TALK 1: Through a Glass Darkly: Inferring the Palaeolithic Mind

Jack Pettigrew

University of Queensland, Australia

 

SPECIAL TALK 2: Understanding Consciousness: from the lab to the clinic.

Stanislas Dahaene

INSERM-CEA Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, Collège de France

-------------------------------------------------

 

SYMPOSIUM 1: Consciousness Across The Species: The adaptive Value of Pain

AEB Auditorum - Thursday 16:00

Chair: Adam Shriver 

Talk 1. Victoria Braithwaite (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
"Do fish feel pain"

Talk 2. Dan Weary (The University of British Columbia, Canada)
“Experimental design and strength of inferences regarding affect during loss of consciousness”

Talk 3. David Edelman (Bennington College, USA)
“Identifying nociception and the experience of pain in the octopus”

Talk 4. Paula Droege (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
“In defense of function 

 

 

SYMPOSIUM 2: Quantifying Consciousness: Theoretical and clinical implications   

AEB Auditorum - Friday 10:30

Chair: Jacobo Sitt and Aaron Schurger 

Talk 1. Aaron Schurger (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
"Stability as a signature of neuronal adequacy for subjective report"

Talk 2. Marcello Massimini (The University of Milan, Italy)
“Towards an objective index of the level of consciousness”

Talk 3. Jacobo Sitt (L'Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière, France)
“Insights and applications from contrasting conscious states”

Talk 4. Anil Seth (University of Sussex, UK)
“Quantitative measures of conscious level: prospects and perils”

 

 

SYMPOSIUM 3: Unconscious perception: Does it exist, and what should we require from evidence? 

AEB Auditorum - Saturday 10:30

Chair: David Carmel and Axel Cleeremans 

Talk 1. David Carmel (University of Edinburgh, UK)
"Unconscious perception is not a single thing"

Talk 2. Joel Pearson (The University of New South Wales, Australia)
“Using unconscious information for sensory and bistable decisions”

Talk 3. Zoltan Dienes (University of Sussex, UK)
“Improving on the null hypothesis: Bayesian objective and subjective thresholds”

Talk 4. Axel Cleeremans (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium)
“The mind’s sea serpent”

 

 

SYMPOSIUM 4: Consciousness in sleep: what it is like, what can it tell us, and how it can be measured

AEB Auditorum - Saturday 15:30

Chair: Chiara Cirelli

Talk 1. Chiara Cirelli (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
"Neurophysiology of sleep"

Talk 2. Francesca Siclari (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA)
“Assessing sleep consciousness within subjects using a serial awakening paradigm and high-density EEG 

Talk 3. Michael Czisch (Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Germany)
“Sleep, dreams and consciousness: A neuroimaging perspective”

Talk 4. Thomas Metzinger/Jennifer Windt (Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany; Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany)
“Dreaming, consciousness and the self: Spatiotemporal self- location and minimal phenomenal selfhood”

 

 

---------  Concurrent Session 1 - Morning Thursday 17th 10:30  ----------

Stream A: Neural Signatures and Models of Consciousness

VENUE: Steele, rm 206

Patterns of event-related potentials reflect fast unconscious semantic analyses of how images relate to subjective connotations of time 

Stefan Bode [1], Daniel Bennett [1,2], Jutta Stahl [3], Carsten Murawski [2]

[1] Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia, [2] Department of Finance, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia, [3] Department of Psychology, University of Cologne, 50969 Cologne, Germany


 

Spectral phase and power predict stimulus category, but only power predicts visual awareness in intracranial EEG in humans 

Jochem van Kempen [1,2], Hiroto Kawasaki [3], Christopher K. Kovach [3], Hiroyuki Oya [3], Matthew A. Howard [3], Ralph Adolphs [4], Naotsugu Tsuchiya [2]

[1] University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, [2] Monash University, Australia, [3] University of Iowa, IA, USA, [4] California Institute of Technology, CA, USA.

 

Resource allocation during the attentional blink: an MEG study using machine learning 

Sebastien Marti [1,2], King JR [1,2], Dehaene S [1,2,3].

[1] INSERM, U992, Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France, [2] CEA, DSV/I2BM, NeuroSpin Center, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France, [3] Collège de France, F-75005 Paris, France

 

Conscious, but not unconscious, across-trial conflict resolution is associated with theta-band oscillatory neural modulations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex  

Simon van Gaal [1,2] Jun Jiang [1,3] Qinglin Zhang [3]

[1] University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands [2] Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior, Nijmegen, the Netherlands [3] Key laboratory of cognition and personality (Ministry of Education), and Faculty of psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China

 

Spectral signatures of brain networks in disorders of consciousness 

Srivas Chennu [1,2], Paola Finoia [1,2], Evelyn Kamau [1], Judith Allanson [3], Guy B. Williams [4], Martin M. Monti [5], David K. Menon [6], John D. Pickard [1], Adrian M. Owen [7], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [2]

[1] Division of Neurosurgery, University of Cambridge, Box 167, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK [2] Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK [3] Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Box 120, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK [4] Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Box 65, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK [5] Department of Psychology, University of California at Los Angeles, 1285 Franz Hall, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, USA [6] Division of Anaesthesia, University of Cambridge, Box 93, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK [7] The Brain and Mind Institute, Room 225, Natural Sciences Centre, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada

 

“Aboutness” revisited: The implications for, and applicability of, relativizing the content-specificity of qualia in neuroscience 

Yasuko Kitano [1]

[1] Department of History and Philosophy of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo Japan

 

Stream B: Perception and Attention

VENUE: Steele, rm 309

The influence of stimulus visibility in priming depends on the type of masking 

Uwe Mattler [1] Martina Wernicke [1]

Georg August Universität Göttingen Georg Elias Müller Institute for Psychology Department Experimental Psychology Gossler Strasse 14 37073 Göttingen

 

A model of acquired perceptual warping 

Guy Wallis [1]

[1] Centre for Sensorimotor Performance School of Human Movement Studies University of Queensland QLD 4072 Australia

 

Shape perception simultaneously up- and down-regulates neural activity in the primary visual cortex 

Peter Kok [1], Floris P. de Lange [1]

[1] Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Netherlands

 

Neural correlates of subjective awareness for natural scene categorization of color photographs and line-drawings 

Qiufang Fu [1], Yongjin Liu [2], Zoltan Dienes [3], Jianhui Wu [1], Wenfeng Chen [1], Xiaolan Fu [1]

[1] State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China [2] Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, China [3] Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science and School of Psychology, University of Sussex, BN1 9QH, Brighton, United Kingdom

 

Predicting visual consciousness from brain activity: Roles for noise and adaptation

Robert P. O’Shea [1,2], Urte Roeber [1,2,3], Ming Alexander Heathershaw Jones [1], Emma-Lee Durrant [1], Michael L. Hawes [1]

[1] Discipline of Psychology, School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, Australia, [2] BioCog, Institute for Psychology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany, [3] Discipline of Biomedical Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

 

Attention and consciousness may operate though different gain functions 

Jeroen J.A. van Boxtel [1]

[1] School of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash

 

Stream C: Body, Self and Agency

VENUE: Steele, rm 329

Self-Touching Illusion and Bodily Self-Consciousness 

Caleb Liang [1,2], Si-Yan Chang [1], Wen-Yeo Chen [2], Hsu-Chia Huang [3], Yen-Tung Lee [4]

[1] Department of Philosophy, National Taiwan University, Taiwan [2] Graduate Institute of Brain and Mind Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan [3] Institute of Fisheries Science, National Taiwan University, Taiwan [4] Department of Psychology, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

 

Process, Consciousness, and Self 

Karen Yan [1]

[1] Institute of Philosophy of Mind and Cognition, National Yang-Ming University

 

Audience Effect as Evidence for Mirror Self-Recognition in Chickens 

Alexis Garland [1], Inga Tiemann [2], Mareike Fellmin [2], Onur Güntürkün [1]

[1] Ruhr University Bochum, [2] Bruno-Dürigen Institute

 

Altered experiences of control in expertise, schizophrenia and hypnosis: Measuring and understanding changes to the sense of agency 

Vince Polito [1]

[1] Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia

 

Experimentally induced changes in Bodily Self Consciousness affect semantic processing 

Elisa Canzoneri [1], Giuseppe di Pellegrino [2,3], Olaf Blanke [1], Andrea Serino [1]

[1] Center for Neuroprosthetics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, [2] Centre for Studies and Research in Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Bologna,Cesena, Italy, [3] Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

 

Intentional Binding with a Robotic Hand - To what extent is agency modulated by embodiment? 

Emilie Caspar [1], Patrick Haggard [2], & Axel Cleeremans [1]

[1] Consciousness, Cognition and Computation Group (CO3), Centre de Recherche Neurosciences & Cognition (CRCN), ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience & Dept. Psychology, University College London (UCL)

 

 

---------- Concurrent Session 2 – Afternoon Thursday 17th 13:30 --------------

 

Stream A: Anaesthesia, Sleep and Seizures 

VENUE: Steele, rm 206

Brain networks dynamics before sedation predict subsequent loss of consciousness  

Srivas Chennu [1,4], Stuart O’ Connor[2], Ram Adapa[3], David Menon[3] and Tristan Bekinschtein [4]

[1] Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom [2] Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, United Kindgom [3] Division of Anaesthesia, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom [4] MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom

 

Breakdowns in parietal network functional connectivity reflect agent-invariant network changes underlying anaesthetic-induced reductions in consciousness 

Levin Kuhlmann [1], Will Woods [1], John Cormack [2], Sarah Kondogiannis [2], Jamie Sleigh [3], David T.J. Liley [1]

[1] Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, [2] Department of Anaesthesiology, St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, [3] Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Auckland

 

Disruption of hierarchical auditory predictive coding during sleep 

Melanie [1,2], Jacobo Sitt [1,2,3], Jean-Remi King [1,2,3], Maxime Elbaz [4], Leila Azizi-Rogeau [1,2], Marco Buiatti [1,2], Virginie Van Wassenhove [1,2], Stanislas Dehaene [1,2,5,6].

[1] Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U992, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France , [2] NeuroSpin Center, Institute of BioImaging, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France, [3] Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle Épinière Research Center, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, U975 Paris, France, [4] Centre du sommeil et de la vigilance, Hôpital de l’Hôtel Dieu, F-75004 Paris, France, [5] Université Paris 11, Orsay, France, [6] Collège de France, F-75005 Paris, France.

 

Consciousness during Sleep: what happens to it? Its relevance to Insomnia?

Leon C. Lack [1,2], Jeremy Mercer [2]

[1] School of Psychology, Flinders University, South Australia, [2] Adelaide Institute for Sleep Health, Daw Park, South Australia

 

Inducing task-relevant responses in the sleeping brain 

Sid Kouider [1], Thomas Andrillon [1], Louise Goupil [1, 2], Leonardo S. Barbosa [1], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [2], [1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, CNRS/EHESS/DEC-.-ENS, Paris, France, [2] Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, UK.

[1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, CNRS/EHESS/DEC-.-ENS, Paris, France [2] Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, UK.

 

Mechanism of impaired consciousness in childhood absence seizures 

Hal Blumenfeld [1,2,3], Jennifer Guo [1], Robert Kim [1], Stephen Jhun[1], Wendy Xiao[1], Erin Feeney[1], Xiaoxiao Bai[1], Michiro Negishi[4], Hetal Mistry[1], Michael Crowley[5], Linda Mayes[5], and R. Todd Constable[4]

[1] Dept of Neurology, Yale University., New Haven, CT [2] Dept of Neurobiology, Yale University., New Haven, CT [3] Dept of Neurosurgery, Yale University., New Haven, CT [4] Dept of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University., New Haven, CT [5] Child Study Center, Yale University., New Haven, CT

 


Stream B: Predictive Processes 

VENUE: Steele, rm 309

Expect surprises 

Anya Farennikova [1]

[1] Centre for Consciousness, Australian National University

 

Consciousness in the Predictive Mind 

Jakob Hohwy [1]

[1] Department of Philosophy, Monash University

 

Hierarchical Temporal Intentionality 

John Thornton [1]

[1] Institute of Integrated and Intelligent Systems and School of Humanities, Griffith University

 

Predictive Perception of Sensorimotor Contingencies: Explaining perceptual presence and its absence in synaesthesia 

Anil Seth [1]

Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science School of Engineering and Informatics University of Sussex Brighton BN1 9QJ UK

 

Task demands modulate the effects of perceptual expectations in early visual cortex 

Elexa St. John-Saaltink [1], Christian Utzerath [1], Peter Kok [1], Hakwan Lau [1,2], Floris P. de Lange[1]

[1] Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, [2] Columbia University, Department of Psychology, New York, New York, USA

 

Mechanisms of deviance detection are affected by visual consciousness 

Bradley N. Jack [1], Urte Roeber [1,2,3], and Robert P. O’Shea [1,2]

[1] Discipline of Psychology, School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, Australia [2] Institute for Psychology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany [3] Discipline of Biomedical Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia


Stream C: Time Perception and Temporal Processing 

 

VENUE: Steele, rm 329

Hierarchical processing in the infant brain: a late response might signal conscious access in three-month-old infants 

Ghislaine Dehaene-Lambertz [1], A. Basirat [1] and S. Dehaene [1]

[1] INSERM, U992, Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France

 

 

On the modulation of interoception: Insights from the use of food deprivation in healthy females and cognitive-behavioral therapy in anorexia nervosa. 

Olga Pollatos [1] Sarah Weiss [1]

[1] Health Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Ulm, Germany

 

Experimental Evidence That Illusory Percepts Are The Basis Of The Flow Of Time 

Ronald Gruber [1], Michael Bach [2], Richard Block [3]

[1] Stanford University Medical Center, [2] University of Freiburg, [3] Montana State University

 

New evidence for the differences in time perception during foveal and parafoveal vision 

Eve A. Isham [1], Kevin Le [1], Aimee Lynch [1], Steven J. Luck [1], William Prinzmetal [2], Joy J. Geng [1]

[1] University of California, Davis [2] University of California, Berkeley

 

Altered Time Perception in Patients with Bipolar Disorder  

Francesco Giorlando [1,2], Shikha Markanday [2], Andrew J. Anderson [3], Roger H. S. Carpenter [4], Michael Berk [1,2,5,6,7]

[1] Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, [2] Barwon Health and the Geelong Clinic, Swanston Centre, Geelong, Victoria, Australia, [3] Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, [4] Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, Cambridge University, Cambridge UK, [5] IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia, [6] Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, Centre for Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia, [7] The Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

 

Modulating temporal recalibration with degraded visual awareness 

Regan M. Gallagher[1], Kielan Yarrow[2], Derek H. Arnold[1]

[1] University of Queensland, [2] City College London,

 

 

---------  Concurrent Session 3 – Afternoon Saturday 19th 13:15  --------------

Stream A: Action and Behaviour 

VENUE: Steele, rm 206

(Almost) twenty years of pictorial illusions, perception, and action 

Melvyn Alan Goodale [1]

[1] The Brain and Mind Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada

 

The evolutionary function of conscious information processing is revealed by its task-dependency in olfaction 

Andreas Keller [1]

[1] Philosophy Program, Graduate Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016-4309, USA

 

Seeing through action: Implicit action cost constrains the perceptual decision making 

Nobuhiro Hagura [1], Patrick Haggard[1], Jörn Diedrichsen[1]

[1] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, Alexandra House, 17 Queen Square, London, WC1N 3AR, United Kingdom

 

Does a fly know when it is in control? 

Leonie Kirszenblat[1], Angelique Paulk[1], Yanqiong Zhou[1] and Bruno van Swinderen[1]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia

 

Egocentric representation and the two-visual systems hypothesis 

Robert Foley [1]

[1] The Rotman Institute and The Brain and Mind Institute, Department of Philosophy, Western University.

 

The Impact of Prior Expectations on Subliminal Behavioral and Electrophysiological Responses 

Leonardo S. Barbosa [1], Romain Grandchamp [1], Sid Kouider [1]

[1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, EHESS/CNRS/ENS-DEC, 75005 Paris, France.

 

 

Stream B: Metacognition and Clinical Studies of Awareness 

VENUE: Steele, rm 309

Trust your feelings, Luke! Metacognitive awareness guides the selection of low-conflict contexts in the absence of prime awareness 

Kobe Desender [1], Filip Van Opstal [2], Eva Van den Bussche [1]

[1] Free University Brussels, Belgium, [2] Ghent University, Belgium

 

The influence of visual identification on perceptual awareness ratings 

Michal Wierzchon [1], Marta Siedlecka [1], Boryslaw Paulewicz [2]

[1] Consciousness Lab, Institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland, [2] Warsaw School of Social Science and Humanities, Faculty in Katowice, Poland

 

Oscillatory mechanisms related to (pre-)reflective decision-making 

Martijn E. Wokke [1,2], K. Richard Ridderinkhof [1,2]

[1] Amsterdam Brain & Cognition, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands [2] Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

 

Selective impairment in perceptual metacognition following anterior prefrontal lesions 

Stephen M. Fleming [1,2], Jihye Ryu [1,3], John G. Golfinos [4], Karen E. Blackmon [5]

[1] Center for Neural Science, New York University, [2] Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, [3] Department of Psychology, City University of New York, [4] Department of Neurosurgery, New York University School of Medicine, [5] Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine

 

EEG responses to stimuli of personal relevance in healthy controls and disorder of consciousness patients

Manuel Schabus [1,2], Renata del Giudice [1], Julia Lechinger [1], Malgorzata Wislowska [1], Dominik P.J. Heib [1], Kerstin Hoedlmoser [1,2] 

[1] University of Salzburg, Department of Psychology, Laboratory for Sleep, Cognition and Consciousness Research, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, Salzburg (AUSTRIA), [2] Center for Cognitive Neuroscience Salzburg (CCNS) (AUSTRIA)

 

The use of pupil dilation to communicate with locked-in syndrome patients 

Olivia Carter [1], Josef Stoll [2], Camille Chatelle [3], Christof Koch [4], Steven Laureys [3] and Wolfgang Einhauser [2, 5]

[1] Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia
, [2] Neurophysics, Philips-University, Germany
, [3] Coma Science Group, University and University Hospital of Liege, Belgium [4] Allen Institute for Brain Science, USA
 [5] Center for Interdisciplinary Research (ZiF), Bielefeld University, Germany

 

Stream C: Subliminal Processing 

VENUE: Steele, rm 262

Cross cultural difference in unconscious process in implicit learning 

Lulu Wan [1], Zoltan Dienes [2]

[1] Research School of Psychology, Australian National University, Australia, [2] University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

 

Unconscious Salience Accelerates Conscious Access 

Ryan B. Scott [1,3], Anil K. Seth [2,3]

[1] School of Psychology, University of Sussex, [2] Department of Informatics, University of Sussex, [3] Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex

 

A window of subliminal perception 

Kristian Sandberg [1,2] Bo Martin Bibby [3] Simon Hviid Del Pin [1,4] Morten Overgaard [1,4]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Aarhus University [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London [3] Department of Biostatistics, Aarhus University [4] CNRU, Dept. of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg University

 

Measuring Intuition: Unconscious Emotional Information Boosts Decision-Making Accuracy and Confidence 

Galang Lufityanto [1], Christopher Donkin [1], and Joel Pearson [1]

[1] School of Psychology, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2030, Australia

 

Don't make me angry: Manipulating volitional choices to act or inhibit by subliminal emotional faces 

Jim Parkinson [1,4], Sarah N Garfinkel [3,4], Zoltan Dienes [1,4], Anil K Seth [2,4]

[1] School of Psychology University of Sussex, [2] Department of Informatics University of Sussex, [3] Brighton and Sussex Medical School, [4] Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science University of Sussex

 

Attending to the Unseen: The Effects of Spatial Attention on Neural Responses to Visible and Invisible Stimuli 

Cooper Smout [1,2], Jason Mattingley [1,2]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, [2] The University of Queensland

 


-------------------  Poster Session - Friday 18th of July  (final program) ---------------------

 

Philosophy Assorted 

1. Limitations to theories of the mind imposed by bandwidth and irreversibility 

Richard Davies Gill

 

2. "Neurocomplementarity" - A possible basis for our dualistic intuitions? 

Johan Frederik Storm [1]

[1] Department of Physiology, IMB, University of Oslo

 

3. What is the contribution of conscious reflection to reliabilist justification?

Susannah Kate Devitt [1]

[1] Queensland University of Technology

 

4. The Great Mind Shift: Three Scenarios 

Marcus T Anthony [1,2]

[1] Swinburne University of Technology, [2] MindFutures

 

5. On the evolution of conscious attention 

Harry Haroutioun Haladjian [1], Carlos Montemayor [2]

[1] School of Social Sciences and Psychology, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia, [2] Department of Philosophy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA

 

6. The Mood-Emotion Loop 

Muk-Yan Wong [1]

[1] Hang Seng Management College

 

7. Phenomenal Properties as Nonconceptual Representations: A Defense from Autism 

Chieh-Ling (Katherine) Cheng [1], Karen Yan [1]

[1] Institute of Philosophy of Mind and Cognition, National Yang Ming University, Taiwan

 

8. The Non-trivial Subject Unity 

Ting-An Lin [1], Allen Y. Houng [1]

[1] National Yang-Ming University

 

Philosophical and Neuroscientific Theories of Consciousness 

9. The Extended Machinery of Consciousness 

Maria Giovanna Corrado [1]

[1] Cardiff University

 

10. The Negative Neural Correlate of Consciousness 

Marian Schneider [1, 2], Ingo Marquardt [1,3]

[1] Maastricht University, Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience [2] University College London, Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging [3] University of Oxford, Oxford University's Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain

 

11. A Unified Model of Conscious and Unconscious processes 

Kaelasha Tyler [1], David Liley [1]

[1] Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122, Australia

 

12. Natural dualism gives a molecular solution to the mind-body problem for psychiatry

Niall McLaren [1]

[1] Northern Psychiatric Services Brisbane, Australia.

 

13. Inferential processing abnormalities in depression, and the antidepressant mechanisms of non-ordinary states

Paul Liknaitzky [1]

[1] School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne

 

14. Strange choice - approximate answer in dissociative disorder evaluated by a forced-choice test. 

Akihiro Koreki [1], Takaki Maeda [1], Keisuke Takahata [2], Tsukasa Okimura [1], Sho Moriguchi [1], Taro Muramatsu [1], Masaru Mimura [1], Motoichiro Kato [1]

[1]Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. [2]Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan.

 

 

15. Mental causation in the course of neurorehabilitation: an argument for subjective agency? 

Patrick Grüneberg [1]

[1] Artificial Intelligence Laboratory/Center for Cybernics Research, University of Tsukuba, Japan

 

16. Standing Wave Theory of Consciousness: A self-organizing neural reaction-diffusion model of (un)conscious neural dynamics 

Selen Atasoy[1], Isaac Donnelly[1,2], Joel Pearson[1]

[1] School of Psychology, University of New South Wales [2] School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New South Wales

 

17. The neuro-integrative account of consciousness

Lukasz Kurowski [1]

[1] York University

 

Coma, Anaesthesia, Sleep and Seizures 

18. What is ‘unconsciousness’ in a fly or worm? Unpacking general anaesthesia endpoints in model organisms

Oressia Zalucki [1], Bruno van Swinderen [1]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia

 

19. Neural signatures of sleep in the fly brain

Melvyn Yap [1], Bart van Alphen [1,2], Paul Shaw [3], Bruno van Swinderen [1]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, [2] Department of Neurobiology and Physiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA, [3] Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA

 

20. Induced gamma-band activity signals awareness of change in a bistable percept during wakefulness but changes dynamics with sleep onset. 

Andrés Canales-Johnson [1,2], Daniela Cabezas [2], Carolina Silva [2], Francisco Olivares [2], Roberto García [2], Arturo Pérez [2], Álvaro A. Rivera-Rei [2], Valdas Noreika [1], Robert P. Carlyon [1], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [1]

[1] MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom. [2] Laboratory of Cognitive and Social Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago, Chile

 

21. Electroencephalogram approximate entropy influenced by both age and sleep 

Gerick Lee [1, 2], Sara Fattinger [2], Anne-Laure Mouthon [2], Quentin Noirhomme [3], Reto Huber [1]

[1] Institute of Neuroinformatics, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, [2] University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich Switzerland, [3] Coma Science Group, Neurology Department, Cyclotron Research Centre, University Hospital of Liège, University of Liège, Liège Belgium

 

22. Sleepy? Doing it worst without noticing: decrease in performance but not confidence in decision-making while falling asleep 

Stanimira Georgieva [1,2], Tristan Bekinschtein [1].

[1] MRC - Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK [2] Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

23. Left-handedness protects healthy participants from neglect-like effects induced at sleep onset. 

Corinne A. Bareham [1], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [1], Sophie K. Scott [2] and Tom Manly [1]

[1] MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF, United Kingdom, [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, London, United Kingdom

 

24. Neurophysiological markers of sensory-motor expectations in human sleep 

Thomas Andrillon [1,2], Sid Kouider [3]

[1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, UMR8554, Département d'Etudes Cognitives, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France, [2] Ecole Doctorale Cerveau Cognition Comportement, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France

 

25. Meditation as a countermeasure for attention deficits and sleepiness following acute sleep restriction

Mark Kohler [1], Maarten Immink M [2], Mallory Rawlings [1], April Kaeding [1].

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; [2] School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

 

26. Mismatch Negativity in Disorders of Consciousness 

Bochra Zareini [1], Martin J. Dietz [4], Mads Jensen [1], Michael Nygaard Petersen [1], Jørgen Feldbæk [2], Carsten Koch-Jensen [3], Morten Overgaard [1]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital [2] Hammel Neurocenter [3] Neurosurgical Department Aarhus University Hospital [4] Center for Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University Hospital

 

27. Using semantic eyeblink conditioning as an index of conscious function and abstract rule processing in patients with disorders of consciousness 

Moos Peeters [1] , Karalyn Patterson [1,2], Mariano Sigman [3], Adrian M. Owen [4], Srivas Chennu [2], Paola Finoia [5], Evelyn Kamau [2], Tristan A. Bekinschtein [1]

[1] MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, UK [2] University of Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Herchel Smith Building for Brain and Mind Sciences, Robinson Way, Cambridge [3] Laboratory of Integrative Neuroscience, Physics Department, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. [4] Brain and Mind Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7, Canada. [5] Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosciences, University of Cambridge

 

Neural Signatures of Consciousness 

28. Balancing integration and segregation in brain dynamics. 

Peter Stratton [1,2], Janet Wiles [3]

[1] Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia, [2] The University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Queensland, Australia, [3] School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia.

 

29. Direct electrical stimulation of the human default-network core produces no subjective change in consciousness 

Brett L. Foster [1,2], Josef Parvizi [1,2]

[1] Stanford Human Intracranial Cognitive Electrophysiology Program, [2] Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University

 

30. Could the worms have it? 

Timothy Durbridge [1]

[1] Greenhill Research

 

31. A dissociation of conceptualization processes from consciousness processes 

Lau Møller Andersen [1] Morten Overgaard [1,2]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, [2] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Hammel Neurorehabilitation and Research Center, MindLab, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus

 

32. Predicting detection performance based on pre-stimulus EEG responses 

Mana Fujiwara [1,3], Riccarda Peters [1,3], Roger Koenig [1], Naotsugu Tsuchiya [1,2]

[1] School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, [2] Decoding and Controlling Brain Information, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan, [3] Equal contribution

 

33. Initial EEG phase predicts the timing of perceptual switches in continuous flash suppression.

Bryan Paton [1,2,3], Jakob Hohwy [2], Gary Egan [1,3], Naotsugu Tsuchiya [1]

[1] School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, [2] Monash Philosophy & Cognition Lab, Monash University, [3] Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University.

 

34. Informational Structure of Perceptual Experiences

Andrew M. Haun[1], Fabiano Baroni[1], Jochem van Kempen[1], Hiroto Kawasaki[2], Christopher K. Kovach[2], Hiroyuki Oya[2], Matthew A. Howard[2], Ralph Adolphs[3], Naotsugu Tsuchiya[1,4]

[1] Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, [2] University of Iowa, USA, [3] California Institute of Technology, USA, [4] Japan Science and Technology, Japan

 

35. Activity in the auditory cortex and the subject’s awareness

Junpei Nishi [1], Ken Mogi [2], Yoshi Tamori [3]

[1] Graduate Program in Bioscience and Applied Chemistry, KIT, [2] Sony CSL, [3] HISL, KIT

 

36. Stimulus-evoked neural activity and intrinsic variations in visual awareness: An EEG/fMRI study

Joshua J. LaRocque [1], Jason Samaha [2], Olivia Gosseries [3], Giulio Tononi [3] and Bradley R. Postle [2,3]

[1] University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical Scientist Training Program and Neuroscience Training Program, [2] University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Psychology, [3] University of Wisconsin Department of Psychiatry

 

37. Intracranial Markers of Conscious Face Perception in Humans

Fabiano Baroni [1,2], Jochem van Kempen [1,3], Hiroto Kawasaki [4], Christopher K. Kovach [4], Hiroyuki Oya [4], Matthew A. Howard [4], Ralph Adolphs [5], Naotsugu Tsuchiya [1]

[1] Monash University, Australia, [2] University of Melbourne, Australia, [3] University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, [4] University of Iowa, IA, USA, [5] California Institute of Technology, CA, USA.

 

Attention and Perception 

38. Unconscious Gestalt completion affects what we are aware of during Motion Induced Blindness 

Cameron T Ellis [1], Anthony J Lambert [1], Paul M Corballis [1]

[1] Centre for Brain Research, University of Auckland, New Zealand

 

39. Cues triggering recovery from mind wandering 

Taisuke Morita [1], Masato Kawasaki [2]

[1] Tokyo University of Science, [2] Teikyo University of Science

 

40. Some distraction increases conscious awareness 

Kristen Pammer [1] Rosy Allen [1], Hannah Korrel [1,2], Vanessa Beanland [1]

[1] The Australian National University [2] Melbourne University

 

41. Examination of vague experiences during Kanizsa based illusions 

Simon Hviid Del Pin [1], Kristian Sandberg [1,2], Morten Overgaard [1,3]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Aarhus University [2] Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London [3] Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dept. of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg University

 

42. Graphemes sharing phonetic properties tend to induce similar synesthetic colors.  

Mi-Jeong Kang [1], Ye-Seul Kim [1], Ji-young Shin [2], Chai-Youn Kim [1]

[1] Department of Psychology, Korea University, [2] Department of Korean Language and Literature, Korea University

 

43. Localizing category-selective BOLD signals in fMRI using SWIFT  

Koenig-Robert R [1], VanRullen R [2,3] and Tsuchiya N [1]

[1] School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, [2] Centre de recherche cerveau et cognition (CerCo), UMR5549, CNRS, [3] Université Paul Sabatier, CHU Purpan, Toulouse, France

 

44. SSVEP is modulated by dynamical change of object recognition state

Kazuki Azuma [1], Tetsuto Minami [2], Shigeki Nakauchi [1]

[1] Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, [2] Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute, Toyohashi University of Technology

 

45. The Effect of Temporal Attention on Neural Oscillations, Discrimination Accuracy, and Subjective Visibility

Jason Samaha [1], Sawyer Cimaroli [1], Bradley R. Postle [1,2]

[1] University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Psychology, [2] University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Psychiatry

 

46. A Multi-factor Experimental Study on the Attention-orienting Triggered by Visual Subliminal Spatial Cue 

Liao Dongsheng [1], Zhang Jingxuan [1], Han Limin [1], Yang Fang [1], Xiong Xinglin [1]

[1] College of Social Sciences and Humanities, National University of Defense Technology

 

47. Extraction of the covert divided attention by steady-state visual evoked potential

Takahiro Shinkai [1], Tetsuto Minami [1], Shigeki Nakauchi [1]

[1] Toyohashi University of technology

 

48. By How Long does Visual Perception Lag the Physical World? 

Mark Chappell [1]

[1] Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit, Brain and Behavioural Health Centre, Griffith Institute of Health, and School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Australia.

 

49. The Role of Monocular Dominance in Rivalry Onset Bias 

Jody Stanley [1], Jason Forte [1], Alexander Maier [2], Olivia Carter [1]

[1] Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia, [2] Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN USA

 

50. The suppressive effects of phantom colour on conscious perception

Shuai Chang [1], Joel Pearson [1]

[1] School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

 

51. Visual field asymmetries in conscious identification  

Irina M. Harris [1], Cara Wong [1]

[1] School of Psychology, University of Sydney. 

 

52. Do you see what I see? Personality and perceptual suppression 

Anna Antinori [1], Olivia Carter [1], Luke Smillie [1].

[1] Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne.

 

53. The self through time: A neuroscientific investigation using twins 

David Butler [1], Jason Mattingley [1,2], Ross Cunnington [1,2], Thomas Suddendorf [1]

[1] School of Psychology, University of Queensland, [2] Queensland Brain Institute

 

54. Intertwined coding of facial affects and odor hedonics 

Wei Chen [1], Kepu Chen [1], Wen Zhou [1]

[1] Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

55. A functional MRI study on thought suppression

Takashi Kiyonaka [1], Toshihiko Aso [1], Takaaki Aoki [2], Michiyo Inagawa [2], Hidenao Fukuyama [1], Kazuo Nishimura [2]

[1] Human Brain Research Center, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, [2] Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University 

 

Memory 

56. Attentional blink-like effect in working memory 

Zbigniew Stettner [1], Jarosław Orzechowski [1], Krzysztof T. Piotrowski [1]

[1] Institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland

 

57. The awareness of information in working memory: Time delay and confidence assesment.  

Krzysztof T. Piotrowski [1], Zbigniew Stettner [1], Jaroslaw Orzechowski [1]

[1] Jagielonian University, Institute of Psychology

 

58. Availability and consciousness of working memory content in serial recognition.

Jarosław Orzechowski [1], Krzysztof Piotrowski [1], Zbigniew Stettner [1]

[1] Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland

 

59. Modeling access to working memory as a self-evaluation and decision process 

Catherine Wacongne [1, 2, 3, 4], Jean-Pierre Changeux [5], Stanislas Dehaene [1, 2, 3, 4]

[1] INSERM, U992, Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France, [2] CEA, DSV/I2BM, NeuroSpin Center, F-91191 Gif/Yvette, France , [3] University Paris 11, Orsay, France, [4 Collège de France, F-75005 Paris, France , [5] Pasteur Institute, CNRS URA 2182, F75015, Paris, France

 

60. Processing of words related to a previously solved problem. Cognitive response to problem-relatedness depends on working memory capacity 

Marek Kowalczyk [1]

[1] Adam Mickiewicz University, Institute of Psychology, Poznań, Poland

 

61. How Much Do We Consciously See And Remember Across Of Fixations During A Search Task? 

Kaunitz LN [1], Rowe EG [1], Tsuchiya N [1,2].

 [1] School of Psychology and Psychiatry; Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences; Monash University, [2] Decoding and Controlling Brain Information, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan

 

62. Vividness of memory and post-coding events. 

Ayako Onzo [1], Ken Mogi [2]

[1] Kinjo Gakuin University, [2] Sony Computer Science Laboratory

 

63. Recollection of episodic memory with feeing of nostalgia: Autonoetic consciousness of remembering

Jun Kawaguchi [1], Megumi Senda [1]

[1] Department of Psychology, Nagoya University, Japan

 

 

Metacognition and Decision Processes 

64. Lucid dreaming, introspection and awareness of mind-wandering: behavioural and brain bases

Elisa Filevich [1], Timothy Brick [1] & Simone Kühn [1]

[1] Max Planck Institute for Human Development

 

65. Comparing subjective measures of awareness: implications for methodology and the nature of visual experience. 

Bert Windey [1,2,3], Axel Cleeremans [1,2,3]

[1] ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), Université Libre de Bruxelles, Building C / Campus Erasme CP 602, 808, Route de Lennik, 1070 Bruxelles, Belgium. [2] Center for Research in Cognition and Neurosciences (CRCN), Université Libre de Bruxelles, CP 191, Avenue F.-D. Roosevelt, 50, 1050, Bruxelles, Belgium. [3] Consciousness, Cognition and Computation Group, Université Libre de Bruxelles, CP 191, Avenue F.-D. Roosevelt, 50, 1050, Bruxelles, Belgium.

 

66. Confidence Measurement in the Light of Signal Detection Theory 

Sebastien Massoni [1], Thibault Gajdos [2], Jean-Christophe Vergnaud [3]

[1] Queensland University of Technology, [2] Aix-Marseille University, [3] University of Paris

 

67. Overflow as a strategy for the reduction of redundancy. 

Ken Mogi [1]

[1] Sony Computer Science Laboratories

 

68. Fluency and difficulties in an “aha” experience

Tetsuo Ishikawa [1,3], Mayumi Toshima [2], Viktors Garkavijs [2], Ken Mogi [3]

[1] Tokyo Institute of Technology, [2] Graduate University for Advanced Studies, [3] Sony Computer Science Laboratories

 

69. Self-Awareness mediates Executive Functions and Conceptual Change Processes 

Dimitris Pnevmatikos [1], Stella Vosniadou [2], Nikos Makris [3], Giorgos Kyrianakis [1], Kalliopi Eikospentaki [2], Anna Chountala [2], Despoina Lepenioti [2]

[1] University of Western Macedonia, Greece, [2] National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece, [3] Democritus University of Thrace, Greece

 

70. The evolution of metarepresentation: Preschool children, but not chimpanzees, spontaneously prepare for alternative future event outcomes 

[1] School of Psychology, University of Queensland

Jonathan Redshaw [1], Thomas Suddendorf [1]

 

Predictive Processes

71. The effect of expectations on visual processing reverses as stimulus presentation time increases  

Auréliane Pajani [1], Sid Kouider [1]

[1] Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives & Psycholinguistique, Ecole Normale Supérieure - CNRS, 29 rue d’Ulm, 75005, Paris, France

 

72. Is perceptual presence perceptual? From a predictive coding point of view. 

Ryoji Sato [1]

[1] Monash University

 

73. Subliminal enhancement of predictive effects during syntactic processing in the left inferior frontal gyrus: An MEG study

Kazuki Iijima [1,2,3,4], Kuniyoshi L. Sakaia [1,3]

[1]Department of Basic Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan [2]Brain Science Institute, Tamagawa University, Machida-shi, Tokyo, Japan [3]CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan [4]Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Ichiban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan

  

 Subliminal Processes

74. Rapid natural scene categorization of line drawings is less influenced by amplitude spectra: Evidence from a subliminal perception study 

Wenfeng Chen [1], Jing Liang [1], Yongjin Liu [2], Qiufang Fu [1], Xiaolan Fu [1]

[1] State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China, [2] Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, China

 

75. Learning Human Faces Without Awareness

Felipe Pegado [1], Bart Boets [2,3], Hans Op de Beeck [1]

[1] Laboratory of Biological Psychology, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium, [2] Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium, [3] Parenting and Special Education Research Unit, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.

 

76. Unconscious decisional learning: improving unconscious information processing

Alexandra Vlassova [1], Joel Pearson [1]

[1] University of New South Wales

 

77. Conscious Reflection of Unconscious Contingency Learning 

Li Wang [1], Qian Xu [1], Yi Jiang [1]

[1] State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

79. A trial of Unconscious Hypermnesia at 1 week intervals 

Mitsuko Hayashi [1]

[1] Hokkaido University of Education, Hakodate

 

80. Visuo-tactile interplay in conscious and unconscious numerosity encoding 

Nathan Faivre [1,2], Roy Salomon [1,2], Laurène Vuillaume [1,2] & Olaf Blanke [1,2,3]

[1] Center for Neuroprosthetics, School of Life Sciences, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, [2] Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, [3] Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Geneva 1211, Switzerland

 

81. The perception of subliminal facial expressions in individuals with high and low autistic traits: An event-related potential study

Svjetlana Vukusic [1], David Crewther [1], Joseph Ciorciari [1], Jordy Kaufman [1]

[1] Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia

 

82. Unconscious Priming of Power by Words of Height-related Objects and Its Underlying Neural Mechanism

Li Zheng[1], Lin Li[1], Xiuyan Guo [2,3], Zoltan Dienes[4]

[1]School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [2] Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [3] Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [4] Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science and School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

 

Self, Agency and Action 

83. Dominance of the administrating hand in proprioceptive drifts of self-touch illusion is not applicable when hands are crossed 

Kenri Kodaka [1], Yuki Ishihara [1]

[1] Graduate School of Design and Architecture, Nagoya City University

 

84. The dorsal visual processing stream is critical for resolving biomechanical dilemmas in the selection of hand postures.

Philippe A. Chouinard [1,2,*], Daniel K. Wood [2,3,4,*], Alex J. Major [2], and Melvyn A. Goodale [2]. 

[1] School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia. [2] The Brain and Mind Institute and the Department of Psychology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. [3] Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. [4] Department of Neurobiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA. [*] Both authors contributed equally to this work.

 

85. The “lingering alpha effect”: Baseline alpha-band spectral power differences correlate with susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion 

Timothy Lane [1,2,3], Su-Ling Yeh [4,5,6], Jifan Zhou [4], Ting-Yi Lin [1,4], Chia-Hsin Kuo [1, 4], Cheng-Yun Teng [1, 4]

[1] Graduate Institute of Medical Humanities, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan, [2] Institute of European and American Studies, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, [3] Research Center for Mind, Brain, and Learning, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan, [4] Department of Psychology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, [5] Graduate Institute of Brain and Mind Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, [6] Neurobiology and Cognitive Neuroscience Center, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

 

86. The Sense of Agency during Verbal Action 

Hannah Limerick [1], David Coyle [1], James W Moore [2,3]

[1] Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol, UK, [2] Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK, [3] School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, UK.

 

87. Action awareness shapes motor memory consolidation

Arnaud Boutin [1], Herbert Heuer [1], & Arnaud Badets [2]

[1] IfADo - Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Dortmund, Germany, [2] Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition et l'Apprentissage, CNRS - UMR 7295, Poitiers, France

 

88. Dissociating perception from action during conscious and unconscious conflict adaptation 

Anne Atas [1], Kobe Desender [2], Wim Gevers [1] & Axel Cleeremans [1]

[1] Center for Research in Cognition and Neurosciences (CRCN), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), [2] Department of Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)

 

89. Positive bias in agency judgment

Tomohisa Asai [1]

[1] NTT Communication Science Laboratories

 

90. Voluntary Action and Time Perception 

Matti Vuorre [1], Janet Metcalfe [1]

[1] Columbia University

 

91. Distortions in the perceived time of actions and their effects as a marker of disturbed sense of agency

Mark J. Yates [1], Yann Chye [1]

[1] Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne 

 

92. Abnormal Imagined Walking in High-Schizotypal Individuals

Naohide Yamamoto [1], Lucinda V. Rohde [1], Saliha Qadir [1]

[1] Department of Psychology, Cleveland State University

 

93. Neural responses to heartbeats dissociate the self as the subject and the self as the object during spontaneous thoughts

Mariana Babo-Rebelo [1], Craig Richter [1], Catherine Tallon-Baudry [1]

[1] Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) - Ecole Normale Superieure (ENS), 29 Rue d'Ulm, Paris, France

 

94. The Neural Dissociation of Rule-Based and similarity-Based Processing in Implicit Learning

Xiaoli Ling [1], Xiuyan Guo [2,3] , Zoltan Dienes [4]  

[1] School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [2] Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and School of Psychology and Cognitive Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China, [3] Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, Ministry of Education Shanghai Key Laboratory of Brain Functional Genomics, East China Normal University Shanghai, China, [4] School of Psychology, University of Sussex, Sussex House, Brighton BN1 9RH,United Kingdom Laboratory, Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) - Ecole Normale Superieure (ENS), 29 Rue d'Ulm, Paris, France


 

 

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